The Accidental Smallholder Forum

Livestock => Sheep => Topic started by: freethyme on April 10, 2011, 09:20:29 pm

Title: Shepherds crook
Post by: freethyme on April 10, 2011, 09:20:29 pm
Hi
I am after some advice.  Recently I got my first five lambs, which have settled in and all doing well.  I want to get a crook for the odd time that I will need to handle the lambs.  There seems to be either a leg hook or a neck hook.  Which is the best type for me to get. Any ideas and advice would be most welcomed.  Thank you. :sheep: :D
Title: Re: Shepherds crook
Post by: Shnoowie on April 10, 2011, 09:44:33 pm
My crook has both - it works well, but we never use it with with Ryelands, only the Mules.  I think if I had to choose between the two, I'd go for a neck hook - I always worry they may brake a leg!
Title: Re: Shepherds crook
Post by: freethyme on April 10, 2011, 09:59:05 pm
Thanks shnoowie for your help.  Can you tell me any more about your crook with two ends a neck & leg, can you remember its name or who made it and where you got it. Loads of questions, sorry.  I am just keen to do the best thing.  Thanks for your help.
Title: Re: Shepherds crook
Post by: Beewyched on April 10, 2011, 10:14:40 pm
Just been reading an article about crooks in my May edition of Country Smallholding  ;D

I think the crook you mean is the "combination" - the chap doesn't think much of them, his favourite is a "Colroy" neck crook which is made from a fibreglass shaft & a nylon head.  Costs 20-25.
Title: Re: Shepherds crook
Post by: Fleecewife on April 10, 2011, 11:36:38 pm
Don't get an aluminium one - they straighten out the first time a sheep doesn't want to stop  ::)  ;D.  If you have a wooden one, don't let it get damp because the crook end will straighten then too.  I don't use one any more, except the posh one to lean on if I ever get to judge anything, but I agree that a neck one is safer for the sheep.
Title: Re: Shepherds crook
Post by: Freddiesfarm on April 11, 2011, 06:30:14 am
I agree with fleecewife about aluminium - rubbish!  I go for a leg crook every time except when we are doing the sheepdog displays and we use a neck crook as easier to catch children with!!

My farrier makes mine for me as I regularly leave them lying around in strange places.  They have a wooden shaft made from whatever I find in the hedge and then metal top
Title: Re: Shepherds crook
Post by: freethyme on April 11, 2011, 08:45:06 pm
Hi everyone

Thanks for all the advice, I now have a better idea of what to buy. Thanks
Title: Re: Shepherds crook
Post by: SallyintNorth on April 12, 2011, 01:30:55 am
For adult sheep I agree wooden neck crook.  Length of shaft depends on how close you think you can get before lunging!

For lambs you will need either to be extremely nimble so you can catch them in your hands or have a leg crook - which for a lamb is a neck crook!  And given that they are small, aluminium is fine.

Title: Re: Shepherds crook
Post by: VSS on April 12, 2011, 09:37:45 am
Leg crooks are first rate if you can use one! It takes a bit of practice but will hold the sheep really well.

A neck crook doesn't hold the sheep nearly so well, but you can get them with a less practised eye.
Title: Re: Shepherds crook
Post by: dixie on April 12, 2011, 09:42:43 am
I was given a leg crook as a gift but have not been brave enough to try using it! am worried I will cause damage!!
Title: Re: Shepherds crook
Post by: ellisr on April 12, 2011, 11:18:03 am
My Grandpa always had a neck crook with him in the fields but I mainly saw him leaning on it or to put his cap on when he was seeing to an animal. I remember him saying it was never to be use on a tup with a temper on (I now think that is because the tup would have broke it). It was lovely made from wood and horn and he had an old penny nailed to the bottom of it.
Title: Re: Shepherds crook
Post by: andywalt on April 12, 2011, 08:26:45 pm
a neck crook is curved ? a leg crook is a strange shape? norrow then gettng wider is that correct?
Title: Re: Shepherds crook
Post by: dixie on April 12, 2011, 10:35:56 pm
Yep thats correct