Smallholders Insurance from Greenlands

Author Topic: Milking sheep  (Read 7540 times)

waterbuffalofarmer

  • Joined Apr 2014
  • Mid Wales
  • Owner of 61 Mediterranean water buffaloes
Re: Milking sheep
« Reply #15 on: September 29, 2016, 10:50:20 am »
Traditionally they take the lamb away and send to slaughter for veal,

Veal is from cattle not sheep. Lambs go off at 4 months anyway.
In france they kill the lambs at a few days to a week old and use the skin for leather gloves and the meat is a delicacy :)
the most beautiful people we have known are those who have known defeat, known suffering, known struggle, known loss and have found their way out of the depths. These persons have an appreciation, a sensitivity and an understanding of life that fills them with compassion, gentleness, loving concern.

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
    • Trelay Cohousing Community
Re: Milking sheep
« Reply #16 on: September 29, 2016, 12:51:11 pm »
I know that 'milk lamb' is a delicacy 'on the Continent', but having supplied this trade when I was on the moorland farm, it was fresh-from-the-hills straight-off-their-dams up to 15kgs deadweight they were wanting.  I've not heard about eating neonates.  I guess for a sheep dairying business, having an outlet for newborn lambs would be very useful.
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cows (rearing their own calves for beef), pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

macgro7

  • Joined Feb 2016
  • Leicester
Re: Milking sheep
« Reply #17 on: September 29, 2016, 03:13:58 pm »
You know... in Leicester a lot of butcher shops sell "spring lamb".
My in laws buy it but having studied in agricultural college and worked with sheep, traded at the melton mowbray livestock market... I have never heard of that!!!  :roflanim:
Do you think they actually sell "baby lambs"? Or are they just lambs of small breeds? I.E. Cheaper to buy for the butchers? They still sell them for at least 80-90 per 12kg lamb!!!
And apparently it's still cheaper than buying from chopped up pieces from the supermarket.
So what do they actually sell? Maybe they go to the fields in june and nick some lambs!
Growing loads of fruits and vegetables! Raising dairy goats, chickens, ducks, rabbits on 1/2 acre in the middle of the city of Leicester, using permaculture methods.

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
    • Trelay Cohousing Community
Re: Milking sheep
« Reply #18 on: September 29, 2016, 04:25:02 pm »
Spring lambs are that year's lambs, coming in to a market which has hitherto been selling hoggs (last year's lambs) since Christmas.

Farmers who lamb early indoors can have their first lambs ready for the spring lamb trade in March, or even earlier in some counties. Up here in north Cumbria the spring lamb trade starts in April, and is just a very few lambs until later on in May when the first of the outdoor-born lambs start to appear in the mart.

We usually have a few early single lambs ready in May, at 12-14 weeks old.  They'll have been born and reared outside, born in February or occasionally late January.  The bulk of our lambs are born in March, and are still ahead of the majority of the hill and moorland lambs to get to the fat mart.

We've been known to get 100-120 a head for spring lambs in May.  Lambs of the same breeding will fetch 85-95 later in the season.
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cows (rearing their own calves for beef), pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

Hevxxx99

  • Joined Sep 2012
Re: Milking sheep
« Reply #19 on: September 29, 2016, 07:46:28 pm »
Milk lamb is indeed a delicacy: lamb that is still unweaned and usually 4-6 weeks old.  So indeed is effectively the sheep equivalent of veal.

Seems there's a fair old profit in it too

http://www.londonfinefoods.co.uk/product/CFFpmflwholelamb/Pyrenees+Milk+Fed+Lamb+Entier



SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
    • Trelay Cohousing Community
Re: Milking sheep
« Reply #20 on: September 30, 2016, 09:43:23 am »
Wow.  Teeny chops!  Thanks for that Hexvxxx99. 

I wonder if the Blackie lambs that come off the Scottish hills in August and are shipped to France as 'milk lamb' are sold and eaten in the expectation that they're only 6 weeks old...
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cows (rearing their own calves for beef), pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

 

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