Smallholders Insurance from Greenlands

Author Topic: This week on the farm - C5  (Read 3129 times)

arobwk

  • Joined Nov 2015
  • Kernow: despoiled in summer and villages left empty in winter except for Xmas/NY.
This week on the farm - C5
« on: July 28, 2020, 09:01:38 pm »
I've really been enjoying this.  Brilliant format IMHO.

Fleecewife

  • Joined May 2010
  • South Lanarkshire
    • ScotHebs
Re: This week on the farm - C5
« Reply #1 on: July 29, 2020, 01:45:56 am »
I'm such a cynic I quite expected to hate it so I missed the first couple of programmes, but in fact I love it too!  Helly Skelly is great as is Dave with his cheeky grin. What a size of place and enterprise they have  8) .  Tonight I was happy watching the kids on the slide  :D   I think it's sanitised for the audience - those stuck at home during lockdown, to give them an education about food production and how it's done - but it doesn't really suffer for that.
« Last Edit: July 29, 2020, 01:49:05 am by Fleecewife »
"Let's not talk about what we can do, but do what we can"

There is NO planet B - what are YOU doing to save our home?

Do something today that your future self will thank you for - plant a tree

 Love your soil - it's the lifeblood of your land.

Fleecewife

  • Joined May 2010
  • South Lanarkshire
    • ScotHebs
Re: This week on the farm - C5
« Reply #2 on: July 29, 2020, 01:03:12 pm »
There was one thing is this week's show that annoyed me.  That was the way the Jacobs were handled by their horns and it was presented as a plus point.  Using a multihorned sheep's horns to haul them around by is a no-no - Not only does it hurt and anger the animal, but it can twist the horns where they join the skull, even pull them out with a feisty sheep, especially with young ones. An aged tup could probably cope without damage but not one below at least two years.  We once lent a multihorned shearling tup to friends and a couple of months later he was returned, being dragged along by one side horn.  His hornset changed from nicely and evenly set up to having one bent and twisted horn which grew too close to his head.  No wonder the poor lad was unwilling to move being dragged along like that  :rant:   At least on the programme the sheep were just being held, but even so, it's not something which should be done. As with other sheep, a hand under the chin should be enough, with the other hand holding the back of the head for a jumpy one, maybe even blocking the body with your legs, but no horns.
"Let's not talk about what we can do, but do what we can"

There is NO planet B - what are YOU doing to save our home?

Do something today that your future self will thank you for - plant a tree

 Love your soil - it's the lifeblood of your land.

doganjo

  • Joined Aug 2012
  • Clackmannanshire
  • Qui? Moi?
    • ABERDON GUNDOGS for work and show
    • Facebook
Re: This week on the farm - C5
« Reply #3 on: July 30, 2020, 10:03:56 pm »
I love the other one better - Amanda and her family are brilliant. What a great life for kids and they all seem to get on so well together - at least when the cameras are on  ::)
Always have been, always will be, a WYSIWYG - black is black, white is white - no grey in my life! But I'm mellowing in my old age

arobwk

  • Joined Nov 2015
  • Kernow: despoiled in summer and villages left empty in winter except for Xmas/NY.
Re: This week on the farm - C5
« Reply #4 on: July 30, 2020, 11:04:49 pm »
I love the other one better - Amanda and her family are brilliant. What a great life for kids and they all seem to get on so well together - at least when the cameras are on  ::)

You mean "Our Yorkshire Farm" I guess.  Yeah, that's good too. 

 

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