Agri Vehicles Insurance from Greenlands

Author Topic: tail docking infection  (Read 1548 times)

abc123

  • Joined Oct 2018
tail docking infection
« on: April 24, 2020, 03:42:07 pm »
Hello,
I have a few lambs with slight scours and dirty backends. Is this likely to cause infection when tail docking?
Thanks,

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
    • Trelay Cohousing Community
Re: tail docking infection
« Reply #1 on: April 24, 2020, 03:50:40 pm »
In short, yes.  As the tail drops off - takes 2-3 weeks usually - there can be broken skin, so the wound needs to be clean at that point (as well as at the time of applying the band, when dirt can be trapped.)

Docking with a band needs to be done within the first 7 days, btw.  It's a vet job after that.
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cows (rearing their own calves for beef), pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

abc123

  • Joined Oct 2018
Re: tail docking infection
« Reply #2 on: April 24, 2020, 04:06:45 pm »
Thanks Sally. Ok ill try and keep the area cleaner as I think they are about to drop off. Thanks again.

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
    • Trelay Cohousing Community
Re: tail docking infection
« Reply #3 on: April 24, 2020, 05:17:37 pm »
Thanks Sally. Ok ill try and keep the area cleaner as I think they are about to drop off. Thanks again.

Ah, ok, I see where you are coming from now.

Yes, get them clean and try to keep them clean.  You can use the purple antiseptic spray to help keep them clean, and the blue antibiotic one if they actually get infected or you think they might. 
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cows (rearing their own calves for beef), pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

Womble

  • Joined Mar 2009
  • Stirlingshire, Central Scotland
Re: tail docking infection
« Reply #4 on: April 24, 2020, 07:57:15 pm »
Can I just ask a related question about the purple spray?..... Does it actually do anything?

I have a tin of purple foot spray that says "contains violet", and I certainly can't argue with that claim. But does it actually contain anything else? It doesn't say so!!
"All fungi are edible. Some fungi are only edible once." -Terry Pratchett

twizzel

  • Joined Apr 2012
Re: tail docking infection
« Reply #5 on: April 24, 2020, 08:44:07 pm »
Might be worth finding out why they are scouring too- can you take a sample of poo to the vets for an egg count?

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
    • Trelay Cohousing Community
Re: tail docking infection
« Reply #6 on: April 25, 2020, 04:43:51 pm »
Can I just ask a related question about the purple spray?..... Does it actually do anything?

I have a tin of purple foot spray that says "contains violet", and I certainly can't argue with that claim. But does it actually contain anything else? It doesn't say so!!

There are many different purple sprays, I guess.  I used to use Septiclense for general antiseptic needs, and the FootMaster variant for sheep's feet.  I do also use straight Gentian Violet sometimes.  Gentian Violet (hexamethyl pararosaniline chloride, aka crystal violet) is weakly antibacterial and more strongly antifungal, and I am sure its historical use especially with horses is the reason the manufacturers put a violet dye (although often not any actual Gentian Violet, if you look at the ingredients ;) in a lot of their antiseptic and antimicrobial sprays ;).

According to the Nettex product catalogue, Septi-clense contains Chlorhexidine Digluconate and Chlorophen - so, antiseptic / disinfecting,  somewhat antimicrobial., possibly slightly antifungal.  I could not find the details of the specific additive in FootMaster, but I know I researched it when farming in Northumberland and the added ingredient made sense to me at the time for sheep's feet. 
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cows (rearing their own calves for beef), pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

 

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