Agri Vehicles Insurance from Greenlands

Author Topic: Lambs at any time of year?  (Read 3073 times)

OhLaLa

  • Joined Sep 2010
Lambs at any time of year?
« on: June 20, 2011, 12:16:13 pm »
Right, this came up in conversation: Some folks we know of keep their ram in with their flock all year round. I don't know what breed they have (bitsa's I think).

Question-

If he is always in there aren't they constantly lambing 'back to back'?

-----------

I must be missing something. Anyone?

 :sheep:

ellisr

  • Joined Sep 2009
  • Wales
Re: Lambs at any time of year?
« Reply #1 on: June 20, 2011, 12:18:53 pm »
I can keep my ram in as Ryelands only come into season once a year some other breeds will breed like rabbits but not my lot so it works for me and I only have lambs in spring when they should be and normally April but we have had triplets in March.

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
    • Trelay Cohousing Community
Re: Lambs at any time of year?
« Reply #2 on: June 20, 2011, 12:22:45 pm »
Unlike cattle, most sheep are seasonal breeders, and are not sexually active outside of their normal breeding season.  When that breeding season is depends on the breed, the locale and the climate.  

Some breeds of sheep remain sexually active all year round.  Dorset is one, I think (someone will correct me and/or tell us if it's polled or horned or both) - some producers use this to be able to produce lamb all year round, more commonly to have two lambings, one spring and one autumn.  (Not the same ewes, I hasten to add!  Two flocks, one spring lambing one autumn.)

BH used to leave a tup in with a few ewes over the summer, just as part of his general nature and weather sensing input.  The earliest he ever got a lamb here was Jan 4th.  We don't do that now as we are using Charollais tups and if not year-round breeders they certainly start earlier than our Texels!

HTH
Sally
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cows (rearing their own calves for beef), pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

morri2

  • Joined Jun 2008
Re: Lambs at any time of year?
« Reply #3 on: June 20, 2011, 12:29:36 pm »
I have Polled Dorsets and they can lamb any time of the year.  I think the horned Dorsets are the same.

OhLaLa

  • Joined Sep 2010
Re: Lambs at any time of year?
« Reply #4 on: June 20, 2011, 12:48:57 pm »
The subject came up as I'm having difficulty finding a wether to keep in with the ram when he gets separated. Someone asked why I don't just keep him in there.... then the conversation went as per my first post, basically, 'they keep their's in'.

I have pure Suffolks, so I believe they will come into season (once) in August.

PS: I'm taking him out purely as I don't want the gimmer (singular!) tupped, or the others tupped too early (but any other options welcomed)!

« Last Edit: June 20, 2011, 12:51:12 pm by OhLaLa »

TheCaptain

  • Joined May 2010
Re: Lambs at any time of year?
« Reply #5 on: June 20, 2011, 01:51:59 pm »
the polled and horned Dorsets will as they are descendants from Portlands - the original all year breeder.  My girls all took as soon as my Ram lamb started firing 'live rounds' and got them all in lamb the first week of September (except for crazy blue bum - he didn't get hold of until just after bonfire night...)

PDO_Lamb

  • Joined May 2011
    • Briggs' Shetland Lamb
Re: Lambs at any time of year?
« Reply #6 on: June 21, 2011, 02:03:26 pm »
During Wimbeldon Fortnight the importance of getting the first serve in is demonstated across our TV screens. So it is with tupping and the ewes need to mated when conditions are right. I work on 143 days + or -10 for gestation. This enables me to plan for the welfare of the pregnant ewes. Better to keep a wether as comany for your stock ram than have to devote several months to of the level of supervision required at lambing time.

Fleecewife

  • Joined May 2010
  • South Lanarkshire
    • ScotHebs
Re: Lambs at any time of year?
« Reply #7 on: June 21, 2011, 06:00:44 pm »
During Wimbeldon Fortnight the importance of getting the first serve in is demonstated across our TV screens. So it is with tupping and the ewes need to mated when conditions are right. I work on 143 days + or -10 for gestation. This enables me to plan for the welfare of the pregnant ewes. Better to keep a wether as comany for your stock ram than have to devote several months to of the level of supervision required at lambing time.
;D ;D

I do agree with this and I think that there are far more likely to be problems at lambing time if you have no idea when any of your ewes are due.  We leave our tups in for 4 weeks, although some people leave theirs in for 6, but either way you have a definite lambing time to plan for.  You can also choose a time for your flock to lamb which suits your local conditions, such as usual weather (hard to plan for in fact of course) and when your grass typically comes into growth.
"Let's not talk about what we can do, but do what we can"

There is NO planet B - what are YOU doing to save our home?

Do something today that your future self will thank you for - plant a tree

 Love your soil - it's the lifeblood of your land.

 

Turnout of lambs this time of year

Started by Lilljoho (13.4)

Replies: 4
Views: 1657
Last post January 27, 2017, 03:00:48 pm
by Marches Farmer
Grass at this time of the year

Started by Ladygrey (9.57)

Replies: 9
Views: 3162
Last post January 11, 2013, 05:09:14 pm
by Remy
Am I looking for a ram at the wrong time off year?

Started by Azzdodd (9.57)

Replies: 14
Views: 4785
Last post February 23, 2014, 09:33:40 pm
by Blacksheep
Cheapest time of the year to buy..

Started by crimson (9.57)

Replies: 10
Views: 4023
Last post January 08, 2015, 02:32:43 pm
by waterbuffalofarmer
First lambs go for this year.....

Started by Azzdodd (9.13)

Replies: 4
Views: 1738
Last post August 13, 2013, 10:36:51 am
by lachlanandmarcus

Forum sponsors

FibreHut Energy Helpline Thomson & Morgan Time for Paws Scottish Smallholder & Grower Festival Ark Farm Livestock Movement Service

© The Accidental Smallholder Ltd 2003-2022. All rights reserved.

Design by Furness Internet

Site developed by Champion IS