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Author Topic: Bagging up  (Read 2054 times)

Shire1980

  • Joined May 2018
Bagging up
« on: January 29, 2019, 09:06:21 pm »
My sheep are due to start lambing on the 16th of feb but i've noticed that a couple are starting to bag up already.
I was going to bring them inside next week to be on the safe side but after noticing them bagging up do you think i should bring them in sooner?

twizzel

  • Joined Apr 2012
Re: Bagging up
« Reply #1 on: January 29, 2019, 10:20:43 pm »
Probably best to start watching for lambs from a week before the due date. I like to bring them in 2 weeks before so they settle into a routine inside before they start lambing... so yes Iíd bring them in now. Incidentally my ewes have started to bag up this week and arenít due for another month  :thumbsup:

Shire1980

  • Joined May 2018
Re: Bagging up
« Reply #2 on: January 29, 2019, 10:24:04 pm »
Brilliant thanks. I'll get them in tomorrow as the snow is quite bad as well so can't take the chance with them lambing outside

twizzel

  • Joined Apr 2012
Re: Bagging up
« Reply #3 on: January 30, 2019, 07:46:30 am »
Just try and pick a day where they are dry to house them. Bringing in soaking wet ewes is a recipe for pneumonia  :)

StephB

  • Joined Feb 2010
Re: Bagging up
« Reply #4 on: February 19, 2019, 10:01:05 pm »
Sorry to jump in on the conversation but I have three ewes due soon.  do they really need to be bought indoors?  I planned on them lambing outside and only bringing them in if they do not bond or there are any other issues.  We are in Dorset and relatively mild so far.
Living on a 6 acre smallholding in Dorset.
Jersey cow, Aberdeen Angus cattle, small flock of Poll Dorset x sheep, Occasional weaner pigs, Geese, ducks and hens.
Polytunnel / Veg plot.

landroverroy

  • Joined Oct 2010
Re: Bagging up
« Reply #5 on: February 19, 2019, 10:10:13 pm »
No they don't need to be brought in. Especially as the weather is so mild at present. It's handy though to have some form of shelter available in case of problems.
Rules are made:
  for the guidance of wise men
  and the obedience of fools.

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
    • Trelay Cohousing Community
Re: Bagging up
« Reply #6 on: February 19, 2019, 10:16:36 pm »
Iíve done it both ways and unless the weather would kill lambs would always go for outdoor lambing, minimal intervention.  But be sure Iíve got places I can get ewes to if I do need to do anything, and somewhere to put a family or two under cover if necessary.

Item number one on my lambing kit list?  Binoculars. 
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cows (rearing their own calves for beef), pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

bj_cardiff

  • Joined Feb 2017
  • Carmarthenshire
Re: Bagging up
« Reply #7 on: February 20, 2019, 02:14:38 pm »
I've lambed hundreds indoors but only ever had a three sheep lamb outdoors, twice was because all the other ewes had all lambed and been turned out, the weather was nice and ewes were experienced. The other time was a ewe lamb that wasn't supposed to be in lamb and she must of lambed early in the morning and the crows killed the lambs - it was really horrible.

Have you lambed these ewes before? How experienced are you? Personally I'd move them indoors so I can watch them


SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
    • Trelay Cohousing Community
Re: Bagging up
« Reply #8 on: February 20, 2019, 02:42:51 pm »
What type of sheep are they?  My experience is that some breeds / types are so stressed by being indoors (even if acclimatised for a few weeks before lambing), you get a much higher incidence of problems - of all types, but especially rejection of lambs.

And well-meaning but inexperienced fussing has a similar effect... ;)
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cows (rearing their own calves for beef), pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

Backinwellies

  • Global Moderator
  • Joined Sep 2012
  • Llandeilo Carmarthenshire
    • Nantygroes
    • Facebook
Re: Bagging up
« Reply #9 on: February 21, 2019, 08:26:05 am »
What type of sheep are they?  My experience is that some breeds / types are so stressed by being indoors (even if acclimatised for a few weeks before lambing), you get a much higher incidence of problems - of all types, but especially rejection of lambs.

And well-meaning but inexperienced fussing has a similar effect... ;)

I agree. My Llanwenogs. Settle indoors in seconds .... But other breeds don't take to being enclosed
Linda

Don't wrestle with pigs, they will love it and you will just get all muddy.

Let go of who you are and become who you are meant to be.

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