Smallholders Insurance from Greenlands

Author Topic: Grass issue  (Read 838 times)

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
    • Trelay Cohousing Community
Re: Grass issue
« Reply #15 on: March 28, 2021, 12:55:04 pm »
Sometimes starting again is what you need to do. You can get some lovely permanent wildflower mixes to drill after ploughing. Make sure you spray it off before ploughing or youíll just plough dock seeds down which will germinate again. We reseeded a very docky, wet field last year and itís like a different field now (still wet, but thatís a drainage issue).


Iíll run away now before the anti plough, anti spray folk start chasing, itíll give me a head start  :roflanim:

Irrespective of our own opinions, the OP states that it's organic land.  So spraying will not be an option.  It would depend on the circumstances as to whether ploughing might be okay.
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cows (rearing their own calves for beef), pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

Steph Hen

  • Joined Jul 2013
  • Angus Scotland.
Re: Grass issue
« Reply #16 on: March 28, 2021, 08:52:59 pm »
Yellow rattle in the mix whatever you end up doing. Scotia seeds, if youíre in Scotland.
There are other hemiparasitic herbs.

Backinwellies

  • Global Moderator
  • Joined Sep 2012
  • Llandeilo Carmarthenshire
    • Nantygroes
    • Facebook
Re: Grass issue
« Reply #17 on: March 29, 2021, 06:28:04 am »


It has no other plants growing on it bar some thistles, dock and other grasses. It has been completely over run by the grass in question. Unfortunately leaving it in the past is what has allowed it to spread across the site. The only way to stop it getting worse would be to have it regularly cut low something the landowner doesn't want. Livestock would not be an option.

If not to be grazed or mowed then will never be a wildflower meadow .... it is the grazing/mowing which allowes the wildflowers to multiply.   

If this is purple moor grass (which is likely if it is a wet field) then it is a rare habitat and supports many species
 
https://www.daera-ni.gov.uk/sites/default/files/publications/daera/Habitat%20Guide%20-%20Purple%20moor-grass%20and%20rush%20pasture.PDF

Linda

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What type of grass is this?

Started by Buffy the eggs layer (5.8)

Replies: 7
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Last post December 19, 2015, 04:27:07 pm
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