Smallholders Insurance from Greenlands

Author Topic: Goats and fences  (Read 378 times)

Gornoeth

  • Joined May 2019
Goats and fences
« on: April 04, 2021, 08:39:57 pm »
Hi all - we have 2 goats that are just about a year old. One is a pure golden guernsey and the other a golden guernsey cross.

Our pure goat has decided that the grass is definitely greener on the other side of the fence and puts her head through the stock fencing and then gets stuck due to her horns. The other goat then takes this opportunity to give her a good bashing until we hear the noise and come running.

Clearly don't want this to happen at a time when we're not there and then have a seriously injured goat. Any suggestions? Is this a sign they need better grazing and that's why she's putting her head through? Any way to deal with the aggression other than removing her in one way or the other?

They have access to hay at all times (although clearly not as green as it once was) and we feed an Allen and Page goat mix each morning.

Scarlet.Dragon

  • Joined May 2015
  • Aberdeenshire
Re: Goats and fences
« Reply #1 on: April 04, 2021, 11:07:30 pm »
Goats are browsers not grazers so if the grass is longer in the other field it will attract them... but then again they're goats, what's over the fence is always more interesting.

You need a 'crown of shame' for the horned goat.  A stick taped across her horns with gaffer tape that is wider than the hole in the fence will prevent her getting her head through... either that or a stand off electric wire to keep them away from the fences.  If the rylock is solid, goats will climb it like a ladder so preventing her going through may not be the end of your problems.

Is the aggression constant or only when the one is stuck?  If it's only occasional I wouldn't worry too much about it and see how things pan out.  If it's constant then you could try a water pistol when you see the aggression, but normally once the pecking order is sorted out the bullying stops.  You do need to have somewhere that the bullied one can escape for respite and hide though.  Somewhere she can't get trapped but can give the other one a run around for a bit if there's bullying going on.
« Last Edit: April 05, 2021, 11:07:15 am by Scarlet.Dragon »
Excellence is the result of caring more than others think is wise, risking more than others think is safe, dreaming more than others think is practical and expecting more than others think is possible.

Gornoeth

  • Joined May 2019
Re: Goats and fences
« Reply #2 on: April 05, 2021, 08:47:28 am »
A crown of shame, I like it! Will have to give that a try, already remove her once this morning.

The aggression seems ok apart from this issue, the dominant one will push her away from food so we just ensure we separate them with a closed gate when giving muesli so she gets what she needs. Otherwise they seem fine together.

macgro7

  • Joined Feb 2016
  • Leicester
Re: Goats and fences
« Reply #3 on: April 05, 2021, 06:53:43 pm »
Oh my God! Don't even start me on the subject of goats and fences!
My goats live in an enclosure, which is around 15x15 metres, and they constantly think on a new way to get out. All they do is try to make a new whole in the fence - they even jumped 5 ft fence!
My next idea is heras fence panels - the panels used in the construction sites.
Growing loads of fruits and vegetables! Raising dairy goats, chickens, ducks, rabbits on 1/2 acre in the middle of the city of Leicester, using permaculture methods.

Scarlet.Dragon

  • Joined May 2015
  • Aberdeenshire
Re: Goats and fences
« Reply #4 on: April 06, 2021, 10:41:22 am »
A crown of shame, I like it! Will have to give that a try, already remove her once this morning.

The aggression seems ok apart from this issue, the dominant one will push her away from food so we just ensure we separate them with a closed gate when giving muesli so she gets what she needs. Otherwise they seem fine together.

Sounds like the 'dominant' one is just giving her a hard time for being a numpty and getting stuck in the fence.  She may even be trying to help get her out...

Oh my God! Don't even start me on the subject of goats and fences!
My goats live in an enclosure, which is around 15x15 metres, and they constantly think on a new way to get out. All they do is try to make a new whole in the fence - they even jumped 5 ft fence!
My next idea is heras fence panels - the panels used in the construction sites.

Heras panels are solid enough for them to use as a ladder if they're that way inclined... 

Guess I'm lucky with mine that (so far) they've been very well behaved and only got out when someone's not shut a gate properly.  Having said that I have otter net fencing reinforced with 2 lines of stand-off electric wire which is pretty good for keeping them (and the horses) away from the fences.  Theoretically they could climb the mesh deer gates but they either haven't worked that out yet or they're too lazy and content where they are.
Excellence is the result of caring more than others think is wise, risking more than others think is safe, dreaming more than others think is practical and expecting more than others think is possible.

macgro7

  • Joined Feb 2016
  • Leicester
Re: Goats and fences
« Reply #5 on: April 06, 2021, 01:15:55 pm »
To be fair it's only 1 of the 3 that's naughty. She's the one who always tries to escape - when she does the others cry after her and in the past escaped too.
I had to catch them in the allotment next door. Luckily in winter there's not much growing and not many people who would otherwise complain...

They are pregnant at the moment. Hopefully they will lbe less jumpy with kids on foot.
Growing loads of fruits and vegetables! Raising dairy goats, chickens, ducks, rabbits on 1/2 acre in the middle of the city of Leicester, using permaculture methods.

Gornoeth

  • Joined May 2019
Re: Goats and fences
« Reply #6 on: April 06, 2021, 02:35:38 pm »
To be fair the standard stock fencing with a line of barb on the top has done the job. The first few days we had them they found all the weak spots where posts moved or ground was a bit higher so could jump over. Once those were dealt with they've stayed in.
We decided at the weekend to bring them into the barn for a week or 2 to give the ground a rest and hopefully enough longer grass start to grow that she's less interested in over the fence. Got them in separate pens that are next to each other so no bullying. Also giving them some extra greens having raided the co-op reduced veg section.

Will see where that gets us.

macgro7

  • Joined Feb 2016
  • Leicester
Re: Goats and fences
« Reply #7 on: April 06, 2021, 02:44:34 pm »
My one even went underneath the fence! Make sure it is not too much gap underneath :innocent:
Growing loads of fruits and vegetables! Raising dairy goats, chickens, ducks, rabbits on 1/2 acre in the middle of the city of Leicester, using permaculture methods.

 

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