Smallholders Insurance from Greenlands

Author Topic: basic cattle handling equipment  (Read 8440 times)

smudger

  • Joined Jan 2012
  • North Devon/ West Exmoor
basic cattle handling equipment
« on: March 25, 2012, 01:15:53 pm »
We're hoping to get one or two shetlands in the next month or so. My vet said we didn't need to get the full crush if quiet/small type cattle.  At most we are looking at 2 cows/heiffers (and lack of land means we can't ever, ever have more) and sucklers. We have loose boxes (timber but metatl framed) and the side of the piggery unit (150mm dense block wall). What equipment do we need and what kind of set up would work best? ie is it simply cattle hurdles or do we need gates/ archways as well.  I was wondering if using the looseboxes would be better, than along the block wall.

thx.
Traditional and Rare breed livestock -  Golden Guernsey Goats, Blackmoor Flock Shetland and Lleyn Sheep, Pilgrim Geese and Norfolk Black Turkeys. Capallisky Irish Sport Horse Stud.

TheCaptain

  • Joined May 2010
Re: basic cattle handling equipment
« Reply #1 on: March 26, 2012, 09:41:52 am »
I made a crush out of 6 x 2.4m lengths of 2x4 made into a 'T'. We tie it to one of the fence, stick the cow in and then tie it at the other end making a trieangle in which the cow is in the middle of. Has worked perfectly fine for TB testing/milking/insemination etc etc. I'll post a photo later if you want?

robert waddell

  • Guest
Re: basic cattle handling equipment
« Reply #2 on: March 26, 2012, 10:48:40 am »
to use an existing wall you are only half the expense of setting up cattle handling facility's     you get extremes in cattle we had one that would stand in the middle of the field to get pdi and TB tested and another that if she saw the vet from a distance cleared dykes and fences to get away from him
it depends on how much space you have available for a permanent fixture or dismantalable ones what materials you have or is accessible to and what your own ideas are   what would work with Shetlands would not necessarily work with continentals or other breeds
you can get head yokes separate from having to buy a crush  that get concreted in the ground they have to be secure no use fitting it in sockets then the cow running about with a head yoke attached ti it and have a very sturdy gate to close over to keep the cow still and calm  :farmer:

Rosemary

  • Joined Oct 2007
  • Barry, Angus, Scotland
    • The Accidental Smallholder
Re: basic cattle handling equipment
« Reply #3 on: March 26, 2012, 01:15:15 pm »
Ours are halter trained but we have a gate hinged to the back wall of the byre, close to the corner. We tie the animal up and swing the gate over to hold her steady. Works for AI and TB testing. Not sure how we'd manage hoof trimming if it was required.

smudger

  • Joined Jan 2012
  • North Devon/ West Exmoor
Re: basic cattle handling equipment
« Reply #4 on: March 26, 2012, 10:03:04 pm »
I made a crush out of 6 x 2.4m lengths of 2x4 made into a 'T'. We tie it to one of the fence, stick the cow in and then tie it at the other end making a trieangle in which the cow is in the middle of. Has worked perfectly fine for TB testing/milking/insemination etc etc. I'll post a photo later if you want?

The captain - Yes please (photo). Can't picture it at all. Intrigued.

Rosemarie's gate solution would work if we put fixings in one of the stables, then remove gate when we don't need it. If it doesn't work we can at least use the gate somewhere else.  So what does allow foot trimming?
Traditional and Rare breed livestock -  Golden Guernsey Goats, Blackmoor Flock Shetland and Lleyn Sheep, Pilgrim Geese and Norfolk Black Turkeys. Capallisky Irish Sport Horse Stud.

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
    • Trelay Cohousing Community
Re: basic cattle handling equipment
« Reply #5 on: March 27, 2012, 04:11:46 am »
So what does allow foot trimming?
I've been with BH more than 5 years now, his herd is 30+ cows and their followers.  He's trimmed one foot in that time. 

Foot trimming is more of an issue for highly productive dairy cattle, I think. For a suckler or suckler-cum-housecow, it shouldn't be something you need to do very often, if at all.  There'll be someone covers your area with a mobile foot trimming crate if and when you do ever need it, or I guess you could take her to the vet who would presumeably have such facilities.  Otherwise you just manage with your makeshift crush / gates and ropes.
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cows (rearing their own calves for beef), pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

robert waddell

  • Guest
Re: basic cattle handling equipment
« Reply #6 on: March 27, 2012, 09:25:26 am »
our vet does not have foot trimming facility's at his base relying on the customers to have these facility's
i think you will find in this day of health and safety issues and claims galore  inadequate facility's are an accident waiting to happen  it would not be me either with ins or not  :farmer:

princesspiggy

  • Guest
Re: basic cattle handling equipment
« Reply #7 on: March 27, 2012, 10:38:51 am »
we used the gates similar to rosemary with our shetlands, i was a bit slow in moving the girls between the crush- the tb lady had done the 2nd heifer while she was tied up, whilst i was still untieing the 1st heifer in the crush. the tamer they are the less worry u have.
 now we have a wee bull we will have to invest in a crush. im hoping to find/make one that can help with injecting pigs also.

great choice in cattle, u wont regret it, they r gorgeous.

robert waddell

  • Guest
Re: basic cattle handling equipment
« Reply #8 on: March 27, 2012, 11:45:39 am »
i bought a cattle weigh crate that did not work a few hours and a new floor and gate and the perfect solution for jaging large pigs the head lock will restrain any pig from 120 kilos upwards smaller ones you will need a sheep weigher but not the narrow ones that are available     if you have the right handling system you can work with them on your own in safety    it is all down to the individual and there own ideas :farmer:

smudger

  • Joined Jan 2012
  • North Devon/ West Exmoor
Re: basic cattle handling equipment
« Reply #9 on: March 27, 2012, 02:52:19 pm »
I forgot to mention that the seller said that the IV guys are very H&S orientated and might insist on a crush - or certainly something equivalent. Any experiences?
Traditional and Rare breed livestock -  Golden Guernsey Goats, Blackmoor Flock Shetland and Lleyn Sheep, Pilgrim Geese and Norfolk Black Turkeys. Capallisky Irish Sport Horse Stud.

princesspiggy

  • Guest
Re: basic cattle handling equipment
« Reply #10 on: March 27, 2012, 06:37:27 pm »
IV

what is that?

our animal health asked if we would hire a crush, dont know where from though?

Berkshire Boy

  • Joined May 2011
  • Presteigne, Powys
Re: basic cattle handling equipment
« Reply #11 on: March 30, 2012, 10:43:03 am »
I pressume IV is AI.  ;)
Everyone makes mistakes as the Dalek said climbing off the dustbin.

landroverroy

  • Joined Oct 2010
Re: basic cattle handling equipment
« Reply #12 on: April 03, 2012, 09:53:13 am »
I forgot to mention that the seller said that the IV guys are very H&S orientated and might insist on a crush - or certainly something equivalent. Any experiences?

Near us there is a factory with a sign "There is nothing so important it can't be done safely". I couldn't agree more.

I used to go round farms doing pregnancy scanning and you would not believe the makeshift contraptions used to restrain cattle. I was once almost trampled upon by a very quiet cow who merely backed into a gate, the baler twine gave way, and the cow and gate knocked me to the floor. Fortunately the cow didn't panic, got off the gate, and I was able to crawl away. It was not pleasant.
 You can get a perfectly adequate, not fancy, crush for £150 or so. Just keep your eyes open locally for auctions and ebay. It's not worth risking serious injury to yourself, or more likely other people, for the sake of the same money it would cost for 2 good gates.
Rules are made:
  for the guidance of wise men
  and the obedience of fools.

chickenfeed

  • Guest
Re: basic cattle handling equipment
« Reply #13 on: April 04, 2012, 09:12:57 am »
I forgot to mention that the seller said that the IV guys are very H&S orientated and might insist on a crush - or certainly something equivalent. Any experiences?

last year we had a vet insist on a crush this was a first todays vet has also asked for a crush to be used ours came foc from a local farmer that had not had cattle for years great piece of kit hitch it up on the tractor and drop in place always handy to have one if you can get hold at the right price.

foot trimming is something we have never done until last year it was a 9 month old calf thats hoofs just kept growing apparently it happens from time to time.

smudger

  • Joined Jan 2012
  • North Devon/ West Exmoor
Re: basic cattle handling equipment
« Reply #14 on: April 25, 2012, 01:12:35 pm »
Hi all, thx for comments. Veering towards a crush. There are a few on ebay at moment for low ££hundreds.  Anything I should look out for especially as would be buying sight unseen?
Traditional and Rare breed livestock -  Golden Guernsey Goats, Blackmoor Flock Shetland and Lleyn Sheep, Pilgrim Geese and Norfolk Black Turkeys. Capallisky Irish Sport Horse Stud.

 

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