NFU Mutual Smallholding Insurance

Author Topic: BC problems  (Read 1418 times)

arobwk

  • Joined Nov 2015
  • Kernow - some say it's in England !
Re: BC problems
« Reply #15 on: November 21, 2019, 08:03:36 pm »
To me the 'spinning' seems to be a form of the 'rounding up' that most sheepdogs do by instinct.  Sooner she gets a chance to work the better in my opinion.  Don't be soft on her, she's a dog.

"Don't be soft on her, she's a dog"   made me smile, because it's something I 'advise' my ex-OH every now and then.  However,  I would still say, Phb, that you give your troubled BC loads of attention, which is not the same as being soft/spoiling. 
I also agree that the spinning might be a form of rounding up (although such stressed behavior is by no means restricted to collies) and, of course, that she be 'worked'.
« Last Edit: November 21, 2019, 08:26:53 pm by arobwk »
Voss Electric Fence

sheeponthebrain

  • Joined Feb 2016
  • Turriff
Re: BC problems
« Reply #16 on: November 21, 2019, 08:52:07 pm »
if the barking is only at you lighting the raeburn then its attention seeking (more specifically your attention) try getting someone to fuss over her when you light it next

Penninehillbilly

  • Joined Sep 2011
  • West Yorks
Re: BC problems
« Reply #17 on: November 21, 2019, 10:22:19 pm »
if the barking is only at you lighting the raeburn then its attention seeking (more specifically your attention) try getting someone to fuss over her when you light it next
Normally nobody else here, and if OH is here, there would be fireworks from the JR, 'his' dog (or the dog that owns him)?.

Penninehillbilly

  • Joined Sep 2011
  • West Yorks
Re: BC problems
« Reply #18 on: November 21, 2019, 10:25:17 pm »
To me the 'spinning' seems to be a form of the 'rounding up' that most sheepdogs do by instinct.  Sooner she gets a chance to work the better in my opinion.  Don't be soft on her, she's a dog.
I was told she wasn't interested, certainly not looked twice at sheep and we are surrounded by them.
I got her as more of a companion when I'm out and about, but currently not out and about as much  :(
« Last Edit: November 21, 2019, 10:27:15 pm by Penninehillbilly »

Penninehillbilly

  • Joined Sep 2011
  • West Yorks
Re: BC problems
« Reply #19 on: November 21, 2019, 10:32:23 pm »
Peaceful

arobwk

  • Joined Nov 2015
  • Kernow - some say it's in England !
Re: BC problems
« Reply #20 on: November 22, 2019, 12:07:35 am »
... I was told she wasn't interested, certainly not looked twice at sheep and we are surrounded by them.


Sounds like the poor thing is a bit confused (has previously been confused) about her purpose in life. Seems to me, though, she has landed in a place where she might work something out idc.  V good luck Phb.  I, for one, will definitely be looking forward to updates along the way.
« Last Edit: November 22, 2019, 12:24:45 am by arobwk »

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
Re: BC problems
« Reply #21 on: November 22, 2019, 08:47:48 am »
To me the 'spinning' seems to be a form of the 'rounding up' that most sheepdogs do by instinct.  Sooner she gets a chance to work the better in my opinion.  Don't be soft on her, she's a dog.
I was told she wasn't interested, certainly not looked twice at sheep and we are surrounded by them.


Well, she could have the instinct to run round things, but not the instinct to chase sheep :).   However, I’ve imagined the spinning to be more like chasing her tail (but without actually trying to catch her tail) : tight circles, rather than running around something?  Both are collie traits :/.

One tactic I’ve used to help with a habit I wanted to break is to put a word on it, so I can ask for it, and then I can also ask for it to stop ;).  (Or ask for something different, which is often easier.)  Collies are very quick to make associations, so if every time she spins you say, “Dance! Dance!”, firstly in an asking tone of voice and then in a “good girl” tone of voice, she will quickly make the association between the word and the action, and you will soon be able to ask for the behaviour. 

I teach all my dogs “Settle” the same way, then I can ask them to settle down whenever I want. 

(Derek Scrimgeour tells us to not ever say “good dog” to a collie, but rather to use the word for the action, while they are doing the action, in a praising tone of voice.  Less open to misinterpretation and making the wrong associations! ;). )

If you can teach her “Dance!” and “Settle”, you can ask for the spinning, praise the obedience (by saying “Dance” in a praising tone of voice) - and then, after giving her a moment of spinning and being praised, ask for settling down. 

Worth a try, anyway! 

And I too feel warm and happy that she’s found a home where she will be given the time and patience to adapt and find her way into a new and rewarding life  :love:   And would love to get updates about her too  :excited: 

She’s beautiful  :love: :dog:
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cow, beef cattle, pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

arobwk

  • Joined Nov 2015
  • Kernow - some say it's in England !
Re: BC problems
« Reply #22 on: February 02, 2020, 03:12:51 pm »
How's it going @Penninehillbilly  ?

doganjo

  • Joined Aug 2012
  • Clackmannanshire
  • Qui? Moi?
    • ABERDON GUNDOGS for work and show
    • Facebook
Re: BC problems
« Reply #23 on: February 02, 2020, 07:53:26 pm »
If you can teach her “Dance!” and “Settle”, you can ask for the spinning, praise the obedience (by saying “Dance” in a praising tone of voice) - and then, after giving her a moment of spinning and being praised, ask for settling down. 

Worth a try, anyway! 

And I too feel warm and happy that she’s found a home where she will be given the time and patience to adapt and find her way into a new and rewarding life  :love:   And would love to get updates about her too  :excited: 

She’s beautiful  :love: :dog:
  I do that too, SiN, Missy gets so excited in teh car when we are getting near places she nows she'll get a run -how she knows he road is beyond me - she somtimes isn't even sitting up looking out teh back window when she'll suddenly jump a=up and start whining.  Must be scent I reckon.  But, 'Settle Missy' and she stops the whining and leaping around, but will still give tiny little squeaks.

I've aways been told to teach my dogs to bark, then if I want them to bark I use 'Speak to me', and they rarely bark otherwise.

I was wondering how she was doing too. I've always thought that dogs that have special traits are special, and more interesting than those that don't.  :innocent:
Always have been, always will be, a WYSIWYG - black is black, white is white - no grey in my life! But I'm mellowing in my old age

Penninehillbilly

  • Joined Sep 2011
  • West Yorks
Re: BC problems
« Reply #24 on: February 02, 2020, 09:06:11 pm »
Kept meaning to give an update  :) .
To be honest at the moment she is a bit of a liability, was told she didn't look at sheep, she DOES (none had been near the fence previously), not been in a field with any, but we are surrounded by them, (inc a few of my own), recall not reliable.
When we go in the goat barn or down to the goats in the field shelter she just goes into a completly mad spin where i have to get her out to calm her dowm, or runs round the back of the shelter trying to get in. Put a rabbit up in the top field one day, she shot after it, deaf to any whistles or calls, rabbit went through fence into neighbours sheep field, she was running up and down the fence, farmer is not known for the best of fences, i was praying she wouldn't find a gap. She did come back to me when she couldn't get through.
Sally, I hadn't realised I hadn't answered,  yes, it is like chasing her tail, sometimes she will just walk in circles, other times she gets faster and faster, I have noticed she will keep glancing at me, I've tried ignoring her, but if she sees me looking she will break off and come to me.
I generally just talk her down, just by me quietly saying 'calm down' a few times seems work,
She doesn't do it as much as when she first came.
Other dog is a big problem with her, he barks when we leave the kitchen, she has started getting aggressive towards him, now its almost as though she is watching and waiting for him to start, she is barking at him, not the door like he is.  I'm thinking she thinks she is protecting us, maybe his barking sounds like it is threatening us?
Husband not happy about her, partly that barking, but sometimes when he takes them a walk she runs off up the lane, (not far, only 10-15metres, and it's a farm track) he will have to come in to get me to go out and get her in,  she hates his torch, a bright worklight, I've told him she hates it, last time she wouldn't come in,  he said he hadn't used it, I told him I'd seen him with it on down the lane, of course he was shining it up the lane looking for her when i went out! i dont like bright lights in my eyes either! But when i was mending a torch, got it working, i noticed she went and curled up in a corner where she doesn't normally, i hadn't shone it at her, Very strange .
OH just left kitchen, JR started barking, she started at him, but came to me when I called, sat on my foot gazing up at me 'aren't I a good girl mum'  :) .
Still won't look at a ball, bought some rubber bones for them both, JR keeps claiming them all, but she will chew at one occasionally.
Have to admit, January I have been bogged down by OH's office work, end of year etc, but can spend a bit more time with her again now.
Another thing, walking trotting normal, but when she runs, she will hold her left rear foot off the ground for a few strides at a time, and when walking, holds her tail to the left all the time, considering she seems frightened of vans, I've wondered if she could have been knocked by one, any thoughts on that please? Or should I be worrying about hip dysplasia?  Not sure what symptoms would be?
At least she's putting a bit of weight on now, and had a dish given to slow that gobbling food down.
And for all our problems, she ain't going anywhere else! :)  Love her..
Sorry, just realised what an essay, but I'm leaving it as is.


« Last Edit: February 02, 2020, 10:43:38 pm by Penninehillbilly »

arobwk

  • Joined Nov 2015
  • Kernow - some say it's in England !
Re: BC problems
« Reply #25 on: February 02, 2020, 10:29:47 pm »
Phb, I don't reckon anyone will mind your "essay" in the slightest.  Much to ponder, but pleased to hear she is starting to make a connection.

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
Re: BC problems
« Reply #26 on: February 03, 2020, 02:27:24 am »
It's great to get an update, thanks so much!

Collie's senses are so sensitive, it could well be that the other dog barking hurts her ears, and yes, bright torches will hurt her eyes.  Could your OH use a red bulb?  (Or red cellophane or pen over the glass.)

Dot used to bark along with Skip when I had the two of them, now he's gone she makes very little noise, even if someone comes to the house.

Would it be worth your OH using an extender lead for her when he takes them out at night?


It sounds as though she is starting to settle, but quite a way to go yet.  They say it takes 4 months for a rehomed dog to start to feel settled and secure, so tbh I think it sounds pretty good progress for such a short time you've had her!  I bet in 6-9 months time you will have forgotten some of the things she does now. ;)
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cow, beef cattle, pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

doganjo

  • Joined Aug 2012
  • Clackmannanshire
  • Qui? Moi?
    • ABERDON GUNDOGS for work and show
    • Facebook
Re: BC problems
« Reply #27 on: February 03, 2020, 01:51:42 pm »
Another thing, walking trotting normal, but when she runs, she will hold her left rear foot off the ground for a few strides at a time, and when walking, holds her tail to the left all the time, considering she seems frightened of vans, I've wondered if she could have been knocked by one, any thoughts on that please? Or should I be worrying about hip dysplasia?  Not sure what symptoms would be?
Holding one rear foot off the ground is indication of slipping patella - nothing to do with hips.  Your vet might be able to advise, but if left to get worse it can mean an operation and enforced cage rest, so best see them early rather than later on.
Always have been, always will be, a WYSIWYG - black is black, white is white - no grey in my life! But I'm mellowing in my old age

 

Ear problems - update

Started by Bionic

Replies: 14
Views: 4112
Last post January 28, 2013, 05:12:34 pm
by Bionic
Sorry.... but old dogs problems again

Started by Kitchen Cottage

Replies: 13
Views: 3863
Last post October 30, 2013, 05:59:20 pm
by doganjo
Breed problems, hybrid vigour - discussion

Started by SallyintNorth

Replies: 57
Views: 12267
Last post February 09, 2015, 08:56:14 pm
by sabrina
What small breed dog gives birth with the least chance of problems?

Started by GBov

Replies: 16
Views: 1476
Last post December 10, 2019, 01:03:39 pm
by Fleecewife

Forum sponsors

FibreHut Energy Helpline Thomson & Morgan Time for Paws Scottish Smallholder & Grower Festival Little Peckers

© The Accidental Smallholder Ltd 2003-2020. All rights reserved.

Design by Furness Internet

Site developed by Champion IS