Smallholders Insurance from Greenlands

Author Topic: Replacing fence posts  (Read 6615 times)

Dans

  • Joined Jun 2012
  • Spalding
    • Six Oaks
    • Facebook
Replacing fence posts
« on: January 07, 2016, 10:39:45 pm »
Ok the baby is 6 months old and we are finally starting to get things done. Check of the field reveals 15+ posts in the sheep field that are wobbly or completely broken off at the bottom. The previous owners left some posts and a post knocker. We are full of gusto but not sure how to go about this.

Do we need to remove the broken posts (we'd have to dig out the broken bits)? Do we put the new posts in next to the old ones? Or halfway in between? We are utterly clueless. I've turned to my smallholding books and google but everything seems to be about erecting a new fence.

Any advice would be gratefully received, hoping to have a go at it all today.

Dans
9 sheep, 24 chickens, 3 cats, a toddler and a baby on the way

www.sixoaks.co.uk

www.facebook.com/pg/sixoakssmallholding

www.goodlife.sixoaks.co.uk

Ghdp

  • Joined Aug 2014
  • Conwy
Re: Replacing fence posts
« Reply #1 on: January 07, 2016, 11:00:09 pm »
Hmm. We are in the same boat- well we have the spare posts but not the knocker ????. I will see what replies you get! Still are enjoying it Dans? We have had soooo much rain, lots of mud and more  physical work than ever before. Enjoying it here? .. Oh yes...but less rain would be good.
Greg

bloomer

  • Global Moderator
  • Joined Aug 2010
  • leslie, fife
  • i have chickens, sheep and opinions!!!
Re: Replacing fence posts
« Reply #2 on: January 07, 2016, 11:36:01 pm »
If fence generally okay, you will need a pinch bar (long straight heavy metal spike) posts post knocker, hammer and wire fencing staples.

Ignore old posts don't bother removing them it's a pain in the butt.

Use pinch bar to start a new post position about a foot from the broken post. Usually you just jab into the ground and wiggle it a lot to make a hole. Repeat till spike goes in at least a ft maybe more... Stand new post in spiked hole, use post knocker to drive in, this is hard work, and is easier with 2 people... Beware the post knocker will get snagged on fencing unless you push it out of the way temporarily, drive post in as far as necessary, or till it really won't go any further, should be at least 18inches in the ground.
Staple fence to post copying existing posts, not normally stapled tight as wires need to move when tightened.

If all that all fails get a friend to demonstrate first as it's a lot easier to do than type out...

Dans

  • Joined Jun 2012
  • Spalding
    • Six Oaks
    • Facebook
Re: Replacing fence posts
« Reply #3 on: January 08, 2016, 12:10:04 am »
Hey Greg.

Glad thus could be heloful. I did a quick search on here but didn't get much.

I am chomping at the bit to get started. Was so very naive with my plans and a baby. We are quite sodden here with standing water on some of the lsnd but it's let us know more about potential boggy areas and has us thinking about planting things and digging ditches. All good stuff. Glad to hear you are enjoying.

One big bonus to this damp weather, the fence posts go in easily!

Dans
9 sheep, 24 chickens, 3 cats, a toddler and a baby on the way

www.sixoaks.co.uk

www.facebook.com/pg/sixoakssmallholding

www.goodlife.sixoaks.co.uk

Dans

  • Joined Jun 2012
  • Spalding
    • Six Oaks
    • Facebook
Re: Replacing fence posts
« Reply #4 on: January 08, 2016, 12:51:18 am »
Bloomer,

Thank you so much. Thid is perfect and very easy to understand. Hubby had a go last week and knocked two in for a try but did so right next to the broken posts.

Ground is so soft at the moment that I think we'll be ok without the pinch bar. Quite gutted as we had one of those at the old place but it got left in the move.

One last question.  A couple of the rotton posts are ones that have diagonal supports on them. I'm guessing that they need to be replaced differently?  We also have one corner post that has gone too :-(

Dans
9 sheep, 24 chickens, 3 cats, a toddler and a baby on the way

www.sixoaks.co.uk

www.facebook.com/pg/sixoakssmallholding

www.goodlife.sixoaks.co.uk

JTFarms

  • Joined Sep 2014
Re: Replacing fence posts
« Reply #5 on: January 08, 2016, 04:03:13 am »
OK are your post metal T post or wooden post you should go with metal Tpost get at less 1.25 # post or heavier and use woods post only for gates and cornors and end post alot cheaper that way  plus metal T post are easy to drive in in wet soil should be able to buy metal T post in 6 , 6 1\2 , and 7 foot lengths on starter hole needed.        James
James

JTFarms

  • Joined Sep 2014
Re: Replacing fence posts
« Reply #6 on: January 08, 2016, 04:24:50 am »
Let me also add a pair of posthole diggers is standard equipment here in the states for putting woden post  dig my hole at Least 3 feet but perfer 4 feet deep use a tamp bar or one inch wooden rod or tree to tamp back in the dirt that I dug out tamp about a 1\4 of the refill  dirt around wooden post at a time until you refill the hole level to the ground and place remaining dirt around post with shovel and PAC down  by stepping on it with your foot all around the post if soil is wet add some crush stone ad small stones around post in the hole as your tamp the fill drit will make for a strong post that will give you no  trouble for many years do this on your gates corners end post and use your metal T post as line post to just hold your wire up pull wire taught from your cornors or gat post not your metal T post.  James
James

bloomer

  • Global Moderator
  • Joined Aug 2010
  • leslie, fife
  • i have chickens, sheep and opinions!!!
Re: Replacing fence posts
« Reply #7 on: January 08, 2016, 07:48:16 am »
We can't  easily get metal fence posts in the UK.

Days

Anything with a diagonal brace you should replicate where possible if it's in the middle of a run moving it a ft still won't matter.
Big round strainers are a completely different job and best done at described above 4ft hole careful repacking of all the soil that came out round the post, if it all goes in including plus the post then it won't move.
Obviously when replacing strainers you have to tighten fences onto them and that a whole other subject...

Creagan

  • Joined Jun 2013
Re: Replacing fence posts
« Reply #8 on: January 08, 2016, 06:19:53 pm »
For every post you put in the ground:
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Faithfull-DIGBAR72-Digging-Bar-Inch/dp/B000C750D8/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1452276892&sr=8-4&keywords=Digging+bar

And for strainer posts only (the big telegraoh pole sized ones that go at corners etc)
http://www.amazon.co.uk/Silverline-GT41-Post-Hole-Digger-1560-mm/dp/B000LFXUK6/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1452276971&sr=8-4&keywords=Posthole+digger

(Better versions are available but the above is what I have bought and they haven't broken yet!)


If the fence really is in a poor state you might find that it's not actually tensioned properly, it could be just wires hanging on posts. A proper fence should have good tight wires in straight runs between strainer posts, with the smaller posts just serving to keep them spaced right. The strainer posts should be dug well into the ground and packed in with hard rubble, and then appropriately braced as well. It's not easy but it will last for years when done properly.

shep53

  • Joined Jan 2011
  • Dumfries & Galloway
Re: Replacing fence posts
« Reply #9 on: January 08, 2016, 08:15:16 pm »
The quickest way to replace end or corner strainers  /   intermediate  posts on bends is to use a tractor loader or similar and a chain to lift straight out of the ground ( even broken ones ) then use the hole and repack a new post .  I accept that the ground may be to wet at the moment but at some point it will dry / freeze  , you can put in 2 fence posts either side of the strainer to hold temporarily  until conditions improve .      AS described just put new fence posts in near to the old one and  a pinch bar makes it much easier

Dans

  • Joined Jun 2012
  • Spalding
    • Six Oaks
    • Facebook
Re: Replacing fence posts
« Reply #10 on: January 14, 2016, 12:54:42 am »
Thanks guys. Spent the weekend putting in posts along the road so that side is all done. Skow going between fighting brambles and dog rose. Not to mention doing anything with a baby in tow!


It looks like we dont have traditional corners in two corners of the field. Instead it's like the corner has been cut with the fence doing diagonal. The posts on either end of this diagonal bit of fence are each supported by one diagonal post going into the ground. Unfortunately they are all rotton  :(

None of the posts are like telegraph posts either. They are all the same size as the intermediates.

We also have a couple posts a long the straight that are supported by diagonal posts going into the ground. Are these supporting posts? If we replace the upright do we need to replace the diagonals too?

Gah I'm so clueless with all thos. Is there a fencing for dummies I can be pointed to?  :-[

Thank you all for your help so far.

Dans
9 sheep, 24 chickens, 3 cats, a toddler and a baby on the way

www.sixoaks.co.uk

www.facebook.com/pg/sixoakssmallholding

www.goodlife.sixoaks.co.uk

Badger Nadgers

  • Joined Mar 2013
  • Derbyshire/North Staffs
  • Teeswater & Hebridean
Re: Replacing fence posts
« Reply #11 on: January 14, 2016, 06:48:25 am »

Creagan

  • Joined Jun 2013
Re: Replacing fence posts
« Reply #12 on: January 14, 2016, 09:15:41 am »
Thanks guys. Spent the weekend putting in posts along the road so that side is all done. Skow going between fighting brambles and dog rose. Not to mention doing anything with a baby in tow!


It looks like we dont have traditional corners in two corners of the field. Instead it's like the corner has been cut with the fence doing diagonal. The posts on either end of this diagonal bit of fence are each supported by one diagonal post going into the ground. Unfortunately they are all rotton  :(

None of the posts are like telegraph posts either. They are all the same size as the intermediates.

We also have a couple posts a long the straight that are supported by diagonal posts going into the ground. Are these supporting posts? If we replace the upright do we need to replace the diagonals too?

Gah I'm so clueless with all thos. Is there a fencing for dummies I can be pointed to?  :-[

Thank you all for your help so far.

Dans

Too work out what the diagonal post is doing, imagine you are the diagonal post and you are pushing the post- will this tension the fence, i.e. will it be fighting against the wires?

It does sound as though you might need to replace the whole lot at some point, depending on what animals you are trying to keep in or out of course! Do shop around for fencing materials as prices vary a lot. A sawmill is usually the cheapest place to buy new posts. Wire is quite cheap, the square mesh netting (rylock) is a bit pricier. Don't forget that you will also need winders (or raddiseurs as they are sometimes called) to tension each wire, and lots of staples :)

 

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