Food & Craft

Pickled Eggs

  • Hard boiled eggsHard boiled eggs
  • Boiling the vinegarBoiling the vinegar
  • Pack into jarsPack into jars
  • The finished productThe finished product

Ingredients

  • 12 Eggs
  • 1 litre white wine or cider vinegar
  • Black peppercorns
  • Flaked chillies (optional)
  • Whole chillies (optional)

Although we sell our extra eggs to friends and colleagues, there always comes a time, usually during the summer holiday season, when we have more eggs than we can eat or sell. That's when the pickling starts.

Pickled eggs are easy to produce and taste fabulous - a great accompaniment to salads, cold meat, and fish and chips, or slice for a roll or sandwich.

Prep: 10 mins Cook: 10 mins Serves: 12

Equipment

Storage jars with good seals

Instructions

  1. Hard boil the eggs in plenty of water - boil for at least 10 minutes to ensure they are completely set. While the eggs are boiling prepare your jars by washing them in very hot water and rinsing well. Check the rubber seals on the jars for signs of wear - if they aren't in good order get some new ones.

  2. Meanwhile prepare the vinegar - you can use any vinegar but the flavour of your finished eggs will reflect the type of vinegar you use. Standard malt vinegar will be harsher than clear vinegar, while white wine or cider vinegar will give a more rounded flavour. Experiment to find what suits your taste and by all means mix vinegars.

    You'll need about 1 litre of vinegar for each dozen eggs. Put it in a saucepan, bring to the boil and simmer for a minute or two.

    Tip: Add a sprinkling of peppercorns and/or dried chilli flakes for a bit of a kick.

  3. Once the eggs are cooked cover them in cold water and leave to cool. Once cool shell and pack into your jars.

    Tip: For even more kick add some whole chillies at this stage- they will infuse the eggs during pickling.

  4. Sieve the vinegar and pour into the jars covering the eggs completely. Seal the jars well, and store for at least a month before eating. In a cool, dark place they will store well for over 6 months.

Further Reading

Pig: Cooking with a Passion for Pork

Pig: Cooking with a Passion for Pork Johnnie Mountain

Odd Bits: How to Cook the Rest of the Animal

Odd Bits: How to Cook the Rest of the Animal Jennifer McLagan

Soup for All Occasions

Soup for All Occasions New Covent Garden Soup Company

Dough

Dough Richard Bertinet

Cakes: River Cottage Handbook No.8

Cakes: River Cottage Handbook No.8 Pam Corbin

Comments

claire stubbings

Monday 19 September, 2011 at 7:06pm

I have just done my first pickled eggs following your method. I will let you know how they are after christmas. also i have done my first pickled onions. getting into it know xx

Dan

Monday 19 September, 2011 at 7:57pm

Thanks Claire, hope they turn out delicious!

Marilyn

Friday 18 November, 2011 at 3:52pm

Thanks for a proper pickled egg recipe - so that they keep. If you just want to pickle a few and eat them pretty soon afterwards you can cheat. When you finish any jar of pickles (beetroot makes pretty coloured eggs for slicing on a salad. Just add boiled eggs to the left over vinegar. Keep in the fridge for a few days, longer if you like. This way you only have a few at a time and you end up with all kinds of flavours and colours - depending which pickle they've followed.... onions, dill, beetroot etc. I do this now there is only two of us and we don't always want to eat up a mountain of proper pickled eggs.

Marilyn

Friday 18 November, 2011 at 3:53pm

I'm just signing up for emails. Thanks.

Dan

Friday 18 November, 2011 at 5:47pm

That's a great idea, will definitely do that in future. Thanks for sharing. :-)

nancy

Sunday 22 September, 2013 at 9:43pm

Do u have to put them in a pressure cooker to preserve them. just curious.

Dan

Monday 23 September, 2013 at 8:17am

No Nancy, just prepare them as explained in the instructions. The vinegar is the preserving agent.

Devin

Sunday 29 September, 2013 at 12:32am

could you make beats like this to?

nancy

Monday 30 September, 2013 at 3:55pm

I have fresh yard eggs. Lots of them. I love to pickle them but i have a hard time getting them to peel. Any tips?

Rosemary

Monday 30 September, 2013 at 5:05pm

I usually keep mine for a couple of weeks before boiling for pickling. I find fresh eggs are always hard to peel.

Marilyn

Monday 30 September, 2013 at 5:32pm

Absolutely right - fresh eggs won't peel neatly - they sort of de-laminate

Marilyn

alf

Friday 4 October, 2013 at 8:21am

I live on a smallholding in rural Bulgaria, and like you we sell surplus eggs to neighbours. However we always have a glut on summer before they go off laying, hens and ducks, so thanks. Eggs in winter. Fabulous;. Just off to make mushroom omelette.

Daria

Sunday 3 November, 2013 at 8:10pm

The secret to peeling fresh eggs is as simple as adding immense amounts of salt to the water. I use about a half cup of salt per 2 dozen eggs. They do not make the eggs salty, but it does something to the shells that make them release with minimal scares to the eggs.

David emery

Tuesday 18 February, 2014 at 9:38pm

Here is a great way to get fresh eggs to peel. I live in north eastern Florida and our chickens and ducks lay eggs all year long. Simply prick the fat end of each egg with a thumbtack pin and place them in a pan of water. Heat the water to a simmer. Do not bring to a rolling boil but adjust the water temperature until you see bubbles rising from the bottom of the pan. Once you see the bubbles simmer the eggs for about 15 minutes. The timing is not at all critical. What happens is that the egg releases gasses which separate the membrane from the egg. Remove the simmered eggs and put them in a sink full of cold water for about 20 minutes. You will now find your eggs easy to peel.

paul evans

Sunday 23 March, 2014 at 8:04am

Very handy tips ,Thank You.

Kenny

Friday 4 April, 2014 at 10:24am

I live in the same area as Accidental Smallholder & i too have an abundance of Eggs at this time of year and i pickle a few now and again.

I find that if you boil the eggs when they are approx 3-5 days old for 10 minutes then cool quickly in cold water, roll to break up the shell then replace back into the cold water, the water gets under the membrane & the eggs peel really easily.

penninehillbilly

Thursday 1 May, 2014 at 12:47pm

I also sometimes crack the shell slightly so it can draw the cold water in, making sure eggs and water are clean.

or If the eggs are difficult to peel, slide a wet teaspoon round the edges, holding under running cold water if necessary.

lewis

Wednesday 21 May, 2014 at 10:27am

I'm curious ... I've pickled cucumber quite a few times and other similar things, but want to give eggs a try.

With cucumbers, I dilute the vinegar quite a lot (around 1:1 vinegar:water, probably), which gives a mellower result.

Is there any reason why this shouldn't work with eggs? I'm wondering if the long time frame means they need a more substantial pickle ..?

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