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Author Topic: bird flu  (Read 42285 times)

northfifeduckling

  • Joined Jan 2009
  • Fife
    • North Fife Blog
bird flu
« on: November 12, 2016, 02:48:39 pm »
should we be worried?

Marches Farmer

  • Joined Dec 2012
  • Herefordshire
Re: bird flu
« Reply #1 on: November 12, 2016, 03:55:53 pm »
My flock is registered and I haven't heard anything of note.  I have the ability to house them all under cover if necessary.

Eve

  • Joined Jul 2010
Re: bird flu
« Reply #2 on: November 12, 2016, 04:25:53 pm »
Not yet, though it seems to be coming closer.


Who here has been through a period of bird flu before and what did you do to protect your birds? What are we legally required to do?

Marches Farmer

  • Joined Dec 2012
  • Herefordshire
Re: bird flu
« Reply #3 on: November 12, 2016, 05:19:53 pm »
You're supposed to register if you have 50+ birds.

northfifeduckling

  • Joined Jan 2009
  • Fife
    • North Fife Blog
Re: bird flu
« Reply #4 on: November 12, 2016, 06:37:20 pm »
You're supposed to register if you have 50+ birds.

[/size]will you be so kind to keep the smaller holders up to date? I'd much appreciate it :bouquet:






Eve

  • Joined Jul 2010
Re: bird flu
« Reply #5 on: November 12, 2016, 07:49:47 pm »
Registering a flock of over 50 has to be done anyway regardless of an outbreak.


The defra website is not much use for keepers of small flocks with regards to protecting your birds against bird flu. I can keep my runs covered, I don't take birds to shows, we disinfect between field and home anyway... Anything else I should know?


I can keep mine from contact with the wild birds for a while, but not everyone can. Fingers crossed we don't get an outbreak  :fc: 


Just read on a US website that the virus remains live in manure for 100 days. Useful to know.
« Last Edit: November 12, 2016, 08:08:04 pm by Eve »

waterbuffalofarmer

  • Joined Apr 2014
  • Mid Wales
  • Owner of 61 Mediterranean water buffaloes
Re: bird flu
« Reply #6 on: November 12, 2016, 08:09:33 pm »
Is there a big outbreak in the UK atm then? Just one question when the chickens are vaccinated from birth is it for bird flu as well?
the most beautiful people we have known are those who have known defeat, known suffering, known struggle, known loss and have found their way out of the depths. These persons have an appreciation, a sensitivity and an understanding of life that fills them with compassion, gentleness, loving concern.

in the hills

  • Joined Feb 2012
Re: bird flu
« Reply #7 on: November 12, 2016, 08:51:36 pm »
I don't believe they're vaccinated for bird flu, WBF.

I've heard nothing of an outbreak. :thinking:

Can someone fill us in please.

northfifeduckling

  • Joined Jan 2009
  • Fife
    • North Fife Blog
Re: bird flu
« Reply #8 on: November 12, 2016, 09:12:41 pm »
30.000 birds culled in Germany. Denmark and the Netherlands as the routes to the UK have been crossed. That's all I know! Apparently so far not a strain dangerous to people.

in the hills

  • Joined Feb 2012
Re: bird flu
« Reply #9 on: November 12, 2016, 09:53:06 pm »
Oh, thank you northfifeduckling.

Think that I would struggle to keep all of mine in confinement unless absolutely necessary. Bit of a worry.

Let's hope it doesn't make it here  :fc:

chrismahon

  • Joined Dec 2011
  • Gascony, France
Re: bird flu
« Reply #10 on: November 13, 2016, 05:50:53 am »
There are several cases across Germany, none of the viruses are harmful to humans (H5N2 and H5N8). From what I read these are all wild birds that have been found dead and been examined for cause. Holland's poultry farmers have been told to keep their birds under cover as a precaution, but at the moment this doesn't apply to non-commercial keepers.


Avian Flu often arises during the migration period as a result of infected poo dropped from the sky into the poultry enclosures. So I suppose that's why birds need to be under cover.

Marches Farmer

  • Joined Dec 2012
  • Herefordshire
Re: bird flu
« Reply #11 on: November 13, 2016, 10:39:23 am »
Just one question when the chickens are vaccinated from birth is it for bird flu as well?
Bird flu is like human flu in that the prevalent strain(s) will vary from year to year.  Not necessarily fatal but I guess if you had a flock of thousands the resulting check to growth or egg laying if it was running through the birds would make it commercially desirable to cull.

northfifeduckling

  • Joined Jan 2009
  • Fife
    • North Fife Blog
Re: bird flu
« Reply #12 on: November 13, 2016, 12:33:49 pm »
There are several cases across Germany, none of the viruses are harmful to humans (H5N2 and H5N8). From what I read these are all wild birds that have been found dead and been examined for cause. Holland's poultry farmers have been told to keep their birds under cover as a precaution, but at the moment this doesn't apply to non-commercial keepers.


Avian Flu often arises during the migration period as a result of infected poo dropped from the sky into the poultry enclosures. So I suppose that's why birds need to be under cover.


they are still checking if it's a mutation that can affect humans. Some commercial farms have been badly affected in Germany, how on earth did it get in there from wild birds I wonder?

Eve

  • Joined Jul 2010
Re: bird flu
« Reply #13 on: November 13, 2016, 04:57:13 pm »
You've only got to have some infected bird pooh on your land and that's it. Gets carried in on boots, cars, coats...


It's in quite a few countries atm, Hungary, Switzerland, Austria, Germany, Denmark... The Netherlands have found some wild birds that died of it this week and Belgium has ordered all commercial flocks to be kept inside. [size=78%] [/size]

Scarlet.Dragon

  • Joined May 2015
  • Aberdeenshire
Re: bird flu
« Reply #14 on: November 13, 2016, 08:59:01 pm »
Guessing most of you are experienced keepers so this may not be relevant.  However, there may be some newbies that start reading the thread and for whom this will be useful.

You don't 'have to' register as a poultry keeper if you have less than 50 birds, but it is strongly encouraged (particularly because of the risks of avian flu etc as you'll get notified of anything relevant in the area). 
This is a good starting point: http://ahvla.defra.gov.uk/documents/surveillance/diseases/backyard-poultry-guidance.pdf. 

This is the 'code of practice' that must be followed: http://www.gov.scot/resource/0039/00391827.pdf

Another useful resource: http://www.rspca.org.uk/adviceandwelfare/farm/farmanimals/chickens

and a beginners guide: http://keeping-chickens.me.uk.

Hope this helps.
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