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Author Topic: Lleyn Ewes  (Read 7824 times)

twizzel

  • Joined Apr 2012
Lleyn Ewes
« on: July 05, 2016, 04:18:31 pm »
We are looking at buying a small flock of breeding ewes having for many years just reared orphan lambs. Having done a bit of research it seems Lleyn ewes would fit our requirements well- hardy, maternal, easy lambing, ability to go out with lambs soon after lambing. We want to cross them to produce a commercial type lamb which does not go over fat easily and can cope with going out soon after birth, aiming to lamb late February. For the first year I would be hesitant using a big framed continental ram on shearlings lambing for the first time so am looking at either a Poll Dorset or Dorset Down, both of which I should be able to hire from a friend. I can't find much information on either of these rams crossed with a Lleyn and wondered if anyone had done it before and how the lambs turned out?

waterbuffalofarmer

  • Joined Apr 2014
  • Mid Wales
  • Owner of 61 Mediterranean water buffaloes
Re: Lleyn Ewes
« Reply #1 on: July 05, 2016, 04:45:01 pm »
I would suggest looking at the Lleyn society website theyre loaded with info and on crossing too. There are also a lot of brilliant breeders on there which could set you up with a starter flock. All the best :thumbsup:
the most beautiful people we have known are those who have known defeat, known suffering, known struggle, known loss and have found their way out of the depths. These persons have an appreciation, a sensitivity and an understanding of life that fills them with compassion, gentleness, loving concern.

twizzel

  • Joined Apr 2012
Re: Lleyn Ewes
« Reply #2 on: July 05, 2016, 04:48:07 pm »
Yes thank you we have contacted a local breeder and are hoping to go to the breed sale at exeter in August, depending on harvest etc. But I was more after people with experience of crossing Lleyns with Dorsets both poll and down, or what other ram would be good for a first time shearling.

waterbuffalofarmer

  • Joined Apr 2014
  • Mid Wales
  • Owner of 61 Mediterranean water buffaloes
Re: Lleyn Ewes
« Reply #3 on: July 05, 2016, 05:34:44 pm »
a few breeders cross them with hampshire downs, they have an article either on the website or the catalogue,not sure, but apparently the cross is quite fast at growing and produces a good carcass
the most beautiful people we have known are those who have known defeat, known suffering, known struggle, known loss and have found their way out of the depths. These persons have an appreciation, a sensitivity and an understanding of life that fills them with compassion, gentleness, loving concern.

Old Shep

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • North Yorkshire
Re: Lleyn Ewes
« Reply #4 on: July 05, 2016, 09:26:48 pm »
We have a few Lleyns.  We put them to a Lleyn tup in their first year for easy lambing which worked nicely then to a texel thereafter,which produces really nice lambs.  For the first year I wouldn't worry too much just go with what tup you can that doesn't get really big lambs.  Just watch the size of the shearings - depending on the strain of Lleyn some don't grow too big - and basically we would get shut, small maternal ewes are not what we need.
Helen - (used to be just Shep).  Gordon Setters, Border Collies and chief lambing assistant to BigBennyShep.

twizzel

  • Joined Apr 2012
Re: Lleyn Ewes
« Reply #5 on: July 05, 2016, 09:28:52 pm »
Thank you- will note that r.e the size :)
« Last Edit: July 05, 2016, 10:31:37 pm by twizzel »

Slimjim

  • Joined Apr 2013
  • North Devon
Re: Lleyn Ewes
« Reply #6 on: July 06, 2016, 08:12:11 am »
I have used a Hampshire tup on my Lleyns to good effect. Quick growing lambs that reach a good size. But what's wrong with trying a Lleyn tup for the first year?  Many commercial farmers do use them all the time - perhaps not on their whole flock, but a good proportion of it. Either way, they usually lamb unaided, have loads of milk and the lambs get away to a good start.

devonlady

  • Joined Aug 2014
Re: Lleyn Ewes
« Reply #7 on: July 06, 2016, 08:16:44 am »
Are you in Devon Twizzle? I may well be able to put you on to a breeder who has show quality sheep.

twizzel

  • Joined Apr 2012
Re: Lleyn Ewes
« Reply #8 on: July 06, 2016, 08:40:50 am »
Cornwall, but willing to travel a couple of hours. We don't want to show our sheep (neither of us have the time in summer), more want a good maternal ewe to breed commercial lambs when crossed to a terminal sire.

Louise P

  • Joined Jul 2015
Re: Lleyn Ewes
« Reply #9 on: July 06, 2016, 11:22:42 am »
Hi
You sound like you've already made your mind up with the Lleyn's but have you considered the exlana? All the benefits of Lleyn but without the hassle and associated costs of wool. I think they're perfect for smallholders and there should be plenty around in your neck of the woods.
Whichever breed you decide on, I would also suggest to breed them pure in the first year then to a nice, fairly easy lambing terminal sire.
Good luck with whatever you decide x

twizzel

  • Joined Apr 2012
Re: Lleyn Ewes
« Reply #10 on: July 06, 2016, 11:34:28 am »
Thanks for your thoughts... We are not worried about shearing etc as one of our friends is a shearer. The choice of Rams we have available is not huge and we won't be buying a ram to run permanently as there isn't enough spare fields on the farm to run Rams separately, hence we won't be keeping them pure but want the maternal Lleyn to cross with a terminal sire. I think that's the plan anyway, whatever we do buy has it fit in with a commercial beef herd and so the small flock of sheep would be a commercial venture too. But we want a good maternal breed of ewe to start with  :)
« Last Edit: July 06, 2016, 11:40:25 am by twizzel »

Hellybee

  • Joined Feb 2010
    • www.blaengwawrponies.co.uk
Re: Lleyn Ewes
« Reply #11 on: July 06, 2016, 01:35:44 pm »
Made up for you  :thumbsup:

twizzel

  • Joined Apr 2012
Re: Lleyn Ewes
« Reply #12 on: July 06, 2016, 02:46:22 pm »
Made up for you  :thumbsup:
Thanks! Been a long time coming. So excited! Hopefully we can ditch the shepherdess now :roflanim:

Marches Farmer

  • Joined Dec 2012
  • Herefordshire
Re: Lleyn Ewes
« Reply #13 on: July 06, 2016, 09:30:43 pm »
We once bought 20 Lleyns from a top breeder. Some scanned with quads but none ever managed to raise more than twins and two had huge prolapses despite being in perfect condition for lambing - one jumped out of the pen as the vet left after doing a Caesarean and bled out internally a few hours later.  All we ever saw of them was their tails disappearing into the far corner of the field whenever we went through the gate.  The whole lot went to cull asap.   

waterbuffalofarmer

  • Joined Apr 2014
  • Mid Wales
  • Owner of 61 Mediterranean water buffaloes
Re: Lleyn Ewes
« Reply #14 on: July 06, 2016, 10:26:49 pm »
We once bought 20 Lleyns from a top breeder. Some scanned with quads but none ever managed to raise more than twins and two had huge prolapses despite being in perfect condition for lambing - one jumped out of the pen as the vet left after doing a Caesarean and bled out internally a few hours later.  All we ever saw of them was their tails disappearing into the far corner of the field whenever we went through the gate.  The whole lot went to cull asap.
That isn't very good at all. I bought mine from ruthin mart, mostly, and bred from there, I have tried to breed for both quality carcasses and also tight wool, clean bellies and most importantly excellent temperaments. Any crazy sheep are immediately culled. I recommend going to someone like Bearwood Lleyn, his ewes are brilliant and so are the rams. Try and walk through them and buy from people who handle their sheep a lot too. I am selling off quite a few ewe lambs this year, but not sure how many just yet, as we had virtually all ewe lambs. Again it really depends on who the breeders are and how they handle their sheep, the top breeders are not always the best to go to, look around, talk to the people and go to sales where their sheep are being sold. Make sure you see them in their working clothes and look at as many breeders as poss before buying. It may be worth buying in weaned lambs or yearlings, only a dozen to start with and tame them up and then put them into lamb, so they will be used to your system before being put into lamb, take things slowly and gradually and all should turn out well. All the best with whatever you decide :thumbsup:
the most beautiful people we have known are those who have known defeat, known suffering, known struggle, known loss and have found their way out of the depths. These persons have an appreciation, a sensitivity and an understanding of life that fills them with compassion, gentleness, loving concern.

 

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