Agri Vehicles Insurance from Greenlands

Author Topic: Multiple tup death  (Read 6044 times)

landroverroy

  • Joined Oct 2010
Re: Multiple tup death
« Reply #15 on: July 15, 2016, 11:03:52 am »
Earlier this year I was offered 3 acres of free grazing for my sheep. It was amazing as my lambs did very well on clean pasture and I was very grateful for it. Had anything happened to any of my sheep due to the innocent actions of the field owners I wouldn't have dreamt of accepting any money. Stuff happens. You are no more to blame than anyone else. If you have free grazing of anyone else's land, then to me it is implicit that you accept any risks involved. If you aren't paying someone for a service then you can't expect them to be responsible if by accident things go wrong.

So, in your farmer's place, I wouldn't accept money either. If you tell him that you are happy for him to have free grazing on your field for the foreseeable future, then that is worth more to him than you will ever know. It probably saves him an awful lot of hassle to have some secure grazing for his tups well away from his ewes, and there are times when freedom from hassle is worth a fortune.

So, in my opinion, please don't possibly embarrass him further by offering any more money. I'm sure that to him the matter is closed and he would rather move on.
Rules are made:
  for the guidance of wise men
  and the obedience of fools.

jheard

  • Joined Dec 2015
Re: Multiple tup death
« Reply #16 on: July 15, 2016, 11:46:02 am »
We offered our 3 acre field up for free grazing when we had the floods this year as we were soggy but no flood risk. We had 5 sheep on it which we checked everyday  (we were looking to have sheep so were keen to get involved). Unfortunately one of the younger males died with no warning and like you we were mortified. The owners, again as with you, were very reasonable and matter of fact about it. After much googling I am not sure we did anything wrong but it is still tough to take. The lambs we now have are from the same people who were kind enough to ask us first when they decided to sell some so I hope that also suggests they don't blame us. As they said...."welcome to the world of sheep"! We are slowly learning.... Good luck with your future sheeping!

pharnorth

  • Joined Nov 2013
  • Cambridgeshire
Re: Multiple tup death
« Reply #17 on: July 15, 2016, 12:44:14 pm »
I agree with landroverroy on this. As the shepherd, your farmer friend is fully responsible for ensuring the environment his sheep are kept in is suitable. And is he knew you to be unfamiliar with livestock should have let you know that any garden clipping etc could be a problem. It's understandable that it didn't occur to him but nonetheless I am sure he knows it was primarily his responsibility. Anyway, the risk of having livestock is his not yours, which is why he may or may not insure them but you would not expect to. What if it was a 20k showjumping horse?  Bottle of whiskey or a cake is a nice gesture but compensation. - no.

shep53

  • Joined Jan 2011
  • Dumfries & Galloway
Re: Multiple tup death
« Reply #18 on: July 15, 2016, 12:49:30 pm »
Not sure myself , I have 3 neighbours ,one with 1/2ac who have always put grass clippings in the field and I have never lost any sheep that I could attribute to the clippings , they never bother even when fresh ??    And I agree if he wanted compensation he would have said pretty quickly

Stereo

  • Joined Aug 2012
Re: Multiple tup death
« Reply #19 on: July 15, 2016, 12:53:21 pm »
My first thought was bottle of whisky. That's farmer currency.

Penninehillbilly

  • Joined Sep 2011
  • West Yorks
Re: Multiple tup death
« Reply #20 on: July 15, 2016, 02:03:21 pm »
I think if he has free grazing, and you make it clear it's his for a few years yet, he will be happy with that, if he's refused money once, offering him anything else may still embarrass him.
Couple of years ago I borrowed a zwartble tup, as I went to leave, owner said, 'don't worry if he dies' (look of horror on my face), then she went on to say he was insured. He was returned safely  :- ).
Free grazing is valuable, as is keeping well in with the landowner.

moprabbit

  • Joined Oct 2011
  • North Notts
Re: Multiple tup death
« Reply #21 on: July 16, 2016, 04:34:28 pm »
The field where I keep my sheep is mown quite regularly and the grass clippings are just left. My sheep particularly like the big clods of clippings when they've dried out the best. I've never worried before - do you think I should?
4 pet sheep

Fleecewife

  • Joined May 2010
  • South Lanarkshire
    • ScotHebs
Re: Multiple tup death
« Reply #22 on: July 16, 2016, 05:45:46 pm »
My first thought was bottle of whisky. That's farmer currency.


My husband would certainly not appreciate that, as he doesn't drink alcohol for health reasons, nor would our farmer neighbour, or at least his wife, as he's an alcoholic so it could be enough to send him off on a bender.  Many people don't drink for religious or lifestyle reasons.   Many people don't touch alcohol because they are recovering alcoholics.      Giving alcohol to someone you don't know is a minefield.
"Let's not talk about what we can do, but do what we can"

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regen

  • Joined Jan 2013
Re: Multiple tup death
« Reply #23 on: July 16, 2016, 10:19:46 pm »
Whilst I am no expert I am not sure that grass clippings could be to blame. Last year I had to keep 5 off 3 month old lambs in the barn for about 3 weeks and as i did not have a handy field i opted to cut grass using a strimmer for them. The grass was about 100mm high and significantly bruised by the cutting process but they ate the lot and more with no ill effects what so ever over the 3 week period. It was cut fresh every day but any left over was just left to there for the next day.

Regen

landroverroy

  • Joined Oct 2010
Re: Multiple tup death
« Reply #24 on: July 18, 2016, 05:20:05 pm »
 The issue with grass cuttings is not that the grass has been cut. The sheep do that themselves before they eat it!
 But where it has been cut with a lawnmower and collected in a mass, and tipped in a heap, then you will notice it very soon heats up as it starts to ferment. This is where it is dangerous to sheep and horses as the heating up is caused by a sudden multiplying of bacteria and it is these bacteria that are poisonous to stock. This only happens when the cuttings are left in a pile, like on a compost heap. Grass that is cut in a field, not piled up, but just left to dry is ok as it's not tightly packed like that collected in a lawnmower grassbox.

 
Rules are made:
  for the guidance of wise men
  and the obedience of fools.

 

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