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Author Topic: Best way to cook mutton joints to cut/render out the fat  (Read 1622 times)

farmers wife

  • Joined Jul 2009
  • SE Wales
Best way to cook mutton joints to cut/render out the fat
« on: January 24, 2016, 06:41:01 pm »
Cos I just roasted a shoulder piece and I dont think I cooked it long enough and there were hung blobs of fat in it.  My query is how to roast to keep it moist and not rubbery yet you can drain off the fat and render out as much as possible - should it be 10hrs on very low?


If you put in in a pot with juice etc then the fat will render out properly but the left over sauce will be too fatty and best disposed of.


I love lamb and enjoy mutton but dont want that fatty residue feeling in my mouth and def dont want to put off my children.


Ta
Voss Electric Fence

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
Re: Best way to cook mutton joints to cut/render out the fat
« Reply #1 on: January 25, 2016, 10:45:59 am »
I cook with some water (or wine and water) in the pot.  About an hour before serving, I remove the joint and give it 20 mins uncovered, then put it on one side to rest for 30-40 mins.  It'll ooze more fat during resting, so make sure you have it on a grid of some kind to let the juices flow away.

I skim off the majority of the fat from the juices and make gravy.  The remainder of the juices I save; the fat will rise and harden and can be removed very easily the next day.  The dogs, chickens, etc, love it.  Then the skimmed juices are available for a second gravy or to use as stock.
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cow, beef cattle, pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

farmers wife

  • Joined Jul 2009
  • SE Wales
Re: Best way to cook mutton joints to cut/render out the fat
« Reply #2 on: January 25, 2016, 11:44:41 am »
Thanks Sally - how long would you roast or pot roast?  I have more shoulder and whole leg in the freezer - would you recommend very slow and long or fast roast?

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
Re: Best way to cook mutton joints to cut/render out the fat
« Reply #3 on: January 25, 2016, 12:30:38 pm »
If it's real mutton - old ewe for instance - then long and slow, yes.  Shoulder needs longer and slower than leg.  If you've got an Aga or similar with a slow oven, start it off in the main oven at roughly 165C (covered) for 45 mins, then leave it in the slow oven all day, or overnight.  If using electric, I'd do shoulder at least 5 hours, leg at least 3, at say 140C, after that initial 45mins at 165C.
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cow, beef cattle, pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

farmers wife

  • Joined Jul 2009
  • SE Wales
Re: Best way to cook mutton joints to cut/render out the fat
« Reply #4 on: January 25, 2016, 01:13:13 pm »
Thanks yes a wiltshire Ewe think 3/4 yrs old.  I am thinking of a slow all day cook hoping that the fat will render out to the base of stock.

 

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