NFU Mutual Smallholding Insurance

Author Topic: Internal Fencing  (Read 3053 times)

HesterF

  • Joined Jul 2012
  • Kent
  • HesterF
Internal Fencing
« on: April 04, 2013, 12:09:18 am »
I'm just thinking ahead (way beyond the snow which is still stopping me doing the things I should be doing). We've got about 3 acres at the top of our garden/field (all blends in) which we can play with. I think most is going to become vineyard but we've also planted 25 apple & pear trees up there which we'll probably add to. I was thinking of putting in a fox proof fence around those trees plus a bit of extra land - about an acre in all - so that I could then play around with the space inside to keep various poultry. I've got a big fox proof run at the moment - 20m by 8m - but it's not big enough for the geese to be in full time so I tend to let them all out by day when I'm around but there's always that nagging worry about foxes.

So I was reckoning if I put up a big fence around the outside, I could then have smaller dividing fences inside so that I could split up breeding groups, keep the geese away from the trees until they're bigger, keep the turkey ground clear of chickens etc. But I'd like to be able to move the fences around e.g. outside breeding season, the geese and ducks can all mix up together. So how can I do this? Do any of you do this? A couple of the breeders I bought from had the big external fence but then they just had small enclosed runs inside - either Ark type things that could be moved (too small for my tastes when it has lots of birds inside, fine for a broody and offspring short term) or static fencing. Any ideas?

Thanks,

Hester
Voss Electric Fence

chrismahon

  • Joined Dec 2011
  • Gascony, France
Re: Internal Fencing
« Reply #1 on: April 04, 2013, 08:03:56 am »
We have a fox resistant run 5'6" high of 800 square metres (strung with steel wire tensioned between trees). Inside are 8 coops with attached runs. The area is subdivided with a mixture of linking panels (mesh on a frame with screw eyes at the ends linked with steel bars into the ground) and tripods carrying clothes line with scaffolding mesh hanging off secured with clothes pegs. The tripods are three lengths of willow notched near the top and tied together. Large stones with a hole drilled through provide the weight hung from the tripod for stability -you could use water containers. The tripods and linking panels are easily moved. We have found that cockerels will fight through fencing so they must be kept at least a metre apart with two fences. That's fine as the gap becomes a walkway.

F.CUTHBERT

  • Joined Aug 2011
Re: Internal Fencing
« Reply #2 on: April 04, 2013, 08:44:02 pm »
Would electric nets work for dividing up your orchard? They are fairly easy to set up and move around.
I see they use them in some of the free range poultry farms.

HesterF

  • Joined Jul 2012
  • Kent
  • HesterF
Re: Internal Fencing
« Reply #3 on: April 05, 2013, 01:12:54 am »
I guess they don't even need to be electric if they're on the inside - or is the electric to keep the poultry from sticking their heads through? I do have a net thing (not electric) that I bought last year and have never used - keep thinking I should get it out to at least fence off the patio from the geese.

Chris your system sounds intriguing - I'm going to have to practise with tripods and mesh!

Thanks both,

Hester

chrismahon

  • Joined Dec 2011
  • Gascony, France
Re: Internal Fencing
« Reply #4 on: April 06, 2013, 08:04:19 pm »
When we have a break from house hunting and loads of stuff I would like to do a video of all our setup as I am sure everyone will get something useful from it. Designs for shelters, the enclosure itself, the static and mobile coops, the rearing units, run designs and our chickens that talk to us -plus Bottom who lives in the house as a pet! Just so busy at the moment.


Electric fencing should be well away from your chickens. You want to shock the assailants not those you are protecting (who could heart attack). We have used an electric net for dividing -it was not powered, just a net.

HesterF

  • Joined Jul 2012
  • Kent
  • HesterF
Re: Internal Fencing
« Reply #5 on: April 06, 2013, 09:47:00 pm »
Chris, if you do get a chance I would love to see a video or even some photos as inspiration! Are you going to continue with the breeding after you move? Sounds like it'll take quite some doing to get it all set up again.

chrismahon

  • Joined Dec 2011
  • Gascony, France
Re: Internal Fencing
« Reply #6 on: April 07, 2013, 07:34:18 pm »
We exported all our chickens HesterF (double domestic flock export). They are here with us and will move when we do. Have already bred our TNN's and Leghorn Bantams. Just the Buff Orpingtons and Wyandottes to do. We keep 7 days of eggs for each in case the cockerels have a heart attack or something (after that the eggs are eaten). Then the eggs in stock go in the incubator to keep the breed going here.


Not foxes but the hunting dogs that pose the threat -the Chasse!

OhLaLa

  • Joined Sep 2010
Re: Internal Fencing
« Reply #7 on: April 08, 2013, 05:38:22 pm »
Electric fencing needs to be closely supervised, as stock (and pets, rabbits, hedgehogs etc) can get caught up in it, whether powered up or not. Not a good solution.
I've seen Haras fancing used with good effect - be cautious of the gap at the bottom though.

hughesy

  • Joined Feb 2010
  • Anglesey
Re: Internal Fencing
« Reply #8 on: April 08, 2013, 08:45:57 pm »
I've seen Haras fancing used with good effect - be cautious of the gap at the bottom though.
There isn't a gap at the bottom if you use them upside down.

OhLaLa

  • Joined Sep 2010
Re: Internal Fencing
« Reply #9 on: April 08, 2013, 09:29:18 pm »
There isn't a gap at the bottom if you use them upside down.
Good point but the rubber/concrete blocks (feet) still lift them off the ground, and some of the tops don't have enough clearance for the feet when turned upside down. Plus the newer ones are rounded and can't be used upside down.
Lots of pics here to compare:
http://www.google.co.uk/search?q=heras+fencing&hl=en&tbm=isch&tbo=u&source=univ&sa=X&ei=MSdjUeSIMcjV0QXDnYDIAQ&sqi=2&ved=0CDcQsAQ&biw=1289&bih=571

hughesy

  • Joined Feb 2010
  • Anglesey
Re: Internal Fencing
« Reply #10 on: April 09, 2013, 10:14:18 am »
Don't use the feet. Or the clamps. Panels straight on the ground and tied together at the corners with bale twine. Easy and effective. If I had the round top ones I'd use them the right way up but cut the legs off so they sat flush on the ground.

 

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