Smallholders Insurance from Greenlands

Author Topic: loud noise  (Read 4457 times)

Moleskins

  • Joined Sep 2009
  • England
Re: loud noise
« Reply #15 on: October 18, 2012, 10:48:19 pm »
I would try clapping over the dog, start when it can see you do it,  then build up to doing it as a surprise, do this at odd times, during normal walks, meals etc. Then get someone else to smack two pieces of wood together to make a loud crack ( flat wood not sticks ) Have them stand away from you / the dog when they do it. Gradually build up like that to bin lids at a distance or whatever works for you. All this constantly reinforced with praise and treats alternately. Hold the dog gently if needed to stop it shying away, if at any time you feel it's too much go back a step or rest for a couple of weeks and try again.

That last bit is very important !
Time flies like an arrow but fruit flies like a banana.

colliewoman

  • Global Moderator
  • Joined Jul 2011
  • Pilton
  • Caution! May spontaneously talk rabbits!
Re: loud noise
« Reply #16 on: October 19, 2012, 12:17:23 pm »
Red Dog is noise phobic, and if I was to clap over her she would wet the floor instantly bless her!
 
My recommendations;
 
ALWAYS ALWAYS have visible ID on your pupper. Red Dog bolted once on hearing a firework (in August >:( ) and ran to the nearest house. They phoned immediately but said it was the 1st dog they found wearing a tag :o
 
I put TWO tags on mine, then if I can't see them I can follow the jingling ;)
 
A microchip is IMO a must.
 
Walk only in daylight around Guy Faukes.
 
Play Green Day.... This is the only thing to help Red Dog when the noise is actually happening?? No Idea why, but the American Idiot Album at a reasonable volume and she will sleep soundly in her bed???? Without she is a weeing, dribbling, shaking, dig through the floor mess :dog:
We'll turn the dust to soil,
Turn the rust of hate back into passion.
It's not water into wine
But it's here, and it's happening.
Massive,
but passive.


Bring the peace back

Moleskins

  • Joined Sep 2009
  • England
Re: loud noise
« Reply #17 on: October 19, 2012, 12:26:21 pm »
But with respect Colliewoman, I was trying to offer some constructive advice on how you might re train a dog.



Time flies like an arrow but fruit flies like a banana.

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
Re: loud noise
« Reply #18 on: October 19, 2012, 01:08:25 pm »
I can't remember if you have collies, Moleskins? 

But I have to say, the person he trusts clapping over a collie dog who is scared of loud noises isn't something I would recommend, sorry.  It may work better on a Lab or terrier, I'm not sure, but with a collie, the dog would likely then be scared of loud noises, you, hands, and possibly never trust a human that isn't in a straight jacket ever again.   ;) :D  Call them neurotic if you will - everyone always says genius is next to madness, eh!   :D
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cow, beef cattle, pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

anderso

  • Joined Jan 2012
  • brokenbrough
Re: loud noise
« Reply #19 on: October 19, 2012, 01:39:02 pm »
just to say Spey has been chipped and also has id tags on and as there are not too many places around most people know him as the one that only barks at them it they come in the garden.
 
he stays a distance away from people until he feels he can trust them. he had a really bad time where he was before we took he away from it, (he did not speak for the first week) so we will just keep on looking after him and maybe one day the noise will not affect him to much.
 
he like looking after the chickens and ducks (sometimes I think he beleives he's their dad)
 
Thanks for all the infomation and support for spey 
when the revolution comes it will be a co-op

Alistair

  • Moderator
  • Joined Sep 2012
Re: loud noise
« Reply #20 on: October 19, 2012, 01:40:49 pm »
All the collies I've had (4) have in varying degrees been irrationally frightened of something, ranging from people with walking sticks or Zimmer frames who walk hunched over but not those who walk straight up, little children, strong winds etc, but all have been scared of loud noises, I read somewhere that it is a breed characteristic that they can develop these fears and its do with them being bread to be obsessed with things I.e sheep, mind my second collie, jess, was scared of sheep at first, IMO is cos they're so clever,

I once had a horse that was scared of puddles - that's pretty irrational too, so it's not just dogs, and I'm scared of cows and wasps as well

colliewoman

  • Global Moderator
  • Joined Jul 2011
  • Pilton
  • Caution! May spontaneously talk rabbits!
Re: loud noise
« Reply #21 on: October 19, 2012, 04:48:08 pm »
But with respect Colliewoman, I was trying to offer some constructive advice on how you might re train a dog.

I apologise I did not mean for it to sound as though I was saying you were wrong, but sharing the possiblitity of what may happen. Certainly what would happen with one of mine. With my other collie Pilot the world could explode and he wouldn't worry :D 
 
 
We'll turn the dust to soil,
Turn the rust of hate back into passion.
It's not water into wine
But it's here, and it's happening.
Massive,
but passive.


Bring the peace back

Moleskins

  • Joined Sep 2009
  • England
Re: loud noise
« Reply #22 on: October 19, 2012, 05:12:34 pm »
Some of the above comments seem take us full circle to the old problem of breeding and the problems that have been bred into dogs.
Time flies like an arrow but fruit flies like a banana.

Old Shep

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • North Yorkshire
Re: loud noise
« Reply #23 on: October 19, 2012, 06:50:31 pm »
I think with border collies its not that faults have been bred in, but they have been bred for a very specialised job in a unique environment.  They need excellent hearing to hear their whistle commands at great distance on the fells.  They don't need to be good with strange people, strange dogs, loud noises, hectic activity etc.. because they would never encounter it on a farm in the hills.  So the problems start when we put them in an environment that they weren't bred to cope with :-(
Helen - (used to be just Shep).  Gordon Setters, Border Collies and chief lambing assistant to BigBennyShep.

jaykay

  • Joined Aug 2012
  • Cumbria/N Yorks border
Re: loud noise
« Reply #24 on: October 19, 2012, 07:12:19 pm »
I agree completely Shep  :thumbsup:

Mammyshaz

  • Joined Feb 2012
  • Durham
Re: loud noise
« Reply #25 on: October 19, 2012, 07:21:51 pm »
The dogs ability to withstand loud noises  can also be trained into them. I have participated in working trials. The dogs must be calm to the gun as a test. Criminal scenarios are used to test courage and the dogs must hold their nerves against men running at them shouting and waving 'weapons'. Sometimes the scene involves articles being crashed and banged. Always there is an escaped criminal which must be caught by the dog and held until told to release.

Guess which breed has won the uk championships over the last 4-5 years........ Yes, that noise phobic collie  ;D and by gosh can they take criminals down  :o with shear speed as they chase and jump for the arm.

Of course the german shepherd is always the next best breed  :love: but sometimes way down in 4th or 5th, collies making the top scores  ::)

(actually a lab won the championship last year. The other 3 were collies. No GSDs in the top 4  :'(. Considering this was a GSD competition at one time )

The results still show a collie can withstand loud noises when trained. The CDs I mention are very good for training. Starting from quiet noise and gradually increasing to full volume over months.
« Last Edit: October 19, 2012, 09:13:48 pm by Mammyshaz »

in the hills

  • Joined Feb 2012
Re: loud noise
« Reply #26 on: October 19, 2012, 09:03:49 pm »
I think some breeds have a tendency to be more nervous/highly strung than others but upbringing and training probably plays a part as well.


A gundog that is gun shy would probably be trained by a sort of exposure technique similar in principle to that described by Moleskins. A starting pistol would be fired a field away and then gradually closer over a period of time (dictated by the dogs response). This does work and my retriever was initially afraid of thunder, fireworks, jets and gunfire but is fine with all noise now. However he was also brought up in a family, as a house dog and very confident around people and in most situations.


If this lad was a rescue he may never have lived in a house, seen many people, been exposed to much noise, etc. and do think that many collies (not all) have a tendency to be a little nervous. He may well improve to some extent just by living as part of a loving family and hearing lots of household noise eg. vacuum, pots and pans and being taken lots of places. Think you would have to be very careful that he didn't associate people with the unpleasant noise.

 

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