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Author Topic: Selling yarn - how and where?  (Read 277 times)

Rosemary

  • Joined Oct 2007
  • Barry, Angus, Scotland
    • The Accidental Smallholder
Selling yarn - how and where?
« on: September 10, 2020, 07:56:11 am »
We have boxes and boxes of knitting yarn that we had produced from our Coloured Ryeland fleeces - at some expense. I'd really, really like to start recouping some of it.
It's on our Rosedean Ryelands website shop but I'm wondering if anyone has any hints on where to advertise to find customers. I guess it will be social media of some sort.
Thanks.

Anke

  • Joined Dec 2009
  • St Boswells, Scottish Borders
Re: Selling yarn - how and where?
« Reply #1 on: September 10, 2020, 09:50:05 am »
Ravelry? Facebook marketplace? put it in your searchable keywords for google?

I have never tried to get my shetlands fleeces turned into yarn, as I know I will not have the time/energy to try and sell to re-coup the costs of getting it spun.... but I would love to...This year's WMB wool bag is still sitting here, as I don't think they take any right now...



Fleecewife

  • Joined May 2010
  • South Lanarkshire
    • Wester Gladstone Hebridean Sheep
Re: Selling yarn - how and where?
« Reply #2 on: September 10, 2020, 11:36:10 am »



Try www.etsy.co.uk.  I've not sold stuff on there so I don't know the ins and outs, but I do buy some artisan things on there.  I don't know how you make what you have to sell be one of the first page items to pop up though. Also you will be in competition with handspun yarn, so check your pricing against other products.  I think you have to be brave.  I was once told 'think of a price and double it'.  I can't do that - I was never intended to be a sales person which is why I still have some cones and balls of yarn for sale myself :o


To make yarn sell you have to make it special somehow.  Selling in organza bags seems to go down well, photos of the sheep with their names plus a small narrative about them, the odd love heart and a bit of glitter :D , perhaps a pic of an article which has been knitted from the yarn - a good one on a model, with how plush and warm it is perhaps. Mention the mill it was spun at too.  Some sellers give tiny gifts in with their wares, and a nice handwritten card thanking the purchaser for buying your yarn and wishing them well in the knitting.  Just big it up - you know how to do that Rosemary.
« Last Edit: September 10, 2020, 11:39:01 am by Fleecewife »
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sabrina

  • Joined Nov 2008
Re: Selling yarn - how and where?
« Reply #3 on: September 10, 2020, 04:40:40 pm »
I have a friend, Fleece 4 Ewe and she sells on Facebook market place.

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
Re: Selling yarn - how and where?
« Reply #4 on: September 10, 2020, 05:37:11 pm »
Some producers get a lot of interest through Ravelry, but a quick scout around makes me think that the ones who do best have their own groups on there and are pretty active.  Not something you will have time for, I imagine, Rosemary :/ 

I have asked, on the British Knitters group, for input on what it is best for producers to do.  I will report back, and or you can watch the thread yourself. 
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cow, beef cattle, pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

Rosemary

  • Joined Oct 2007
  • Barry, Angus, Scotland
    • The Accidental Smallholder
Re: Selling yarn - how and where?
« Reply #5 on: September 10, 2020, 06:51:57 pm »
This is our website for the sheep / yarn https://www.rosedeanryelands.co.uk/

Mad Goatwoman of Madeley

  • Joined Sep 2011
  • Telford
Re: Selling yarn - how and where?
« Reply #6 on: September 11, 2020, 12:04:28 am »
Open a Facebook page and put  photos of the sheep and yarn with a few details, then join groups such as Hooked on crochet UK. A lot of people go on there to sell yarn and accessories. You can put a link to your page and your website. Although the group is UK there are a lot of members from other countries, such as USA, Australia, Europe, so it may help you spread your net further afield. Also, people will like and share your page.

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
Re: Selling yarn - how and where?
« Reply #7 on: September 12, 2020, 02:23:00 pm »
Some producers get a lot of interest through Ravelry, but a quick scout around makes me think that the ones who do best have their own groups on there and are pretty active.  Not something you will have time for, I imagine, Rosemary :/ 

I have asked, on the British Knitters group, for input on what it is best for producers to do.  I will report back, and or you can watch the thread yourself.

Lots of input on the thread on Ravelry, some of which you are already doing (eg, listed on Woolsack ) or isn't appropriate at your scale.  One person suggested local farm shops, which I didn't know if you already did, and another asked for the link to your website so I have happily obliged :)

I am sure they would be happy for you to pop a note into the "Self promotion" thread too (and I know Dan is on Ravelry already so could do that.)

Another person linked to the Online Wool Show , which arose from the cancelled-by-pandemic Spring into Wool, which - like many of the other festivals / events - went online this year.  But unlike the others, it seems to be running all year, so might be worth contacting Nick to see what the deal would be.  (I know it was originally the Southern Wool Show (and they do mean Southern England, I'm afraid  ::)), but once these things are online, it can be from anywhere, can't it!  And it had already changed its name to Spring into Wool.  (I see the excellent Wheeldale Woolcrafts are on there, and I am pretty sure they are in Yorkshire, to name but one non-Southern supplier!))

Other things that I have seen work well for people, but require a bit more input and organisation, include teaming up with a designer to offer a pattern-for-your-yarn (and with your palette of natural colours, you could come up with something really interesting, as well as simpler things - and there are always knitters looking for a nice, simple hat as well as those seeking more complex patterns).  Of course not everyone would buy your yarn to make the pattern, but you have the option of doing kits - yarn, needles, pattern and notions - or even a KAL ("knit-along") if you found a designer interested in helping you promote your one-farm British yarn ;)  Have a look at Blacker's designs on Ravelry to get an idea of the sort of thing people enjoy knitting with yarns made from British sheep.

« Last Edit: September 12, 2020, 02:26:31 pm by SallyintNorth »
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cow, beef cattle, pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

 

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