Smallholders Insurance from Greenlands

Author Topic: Dangerous Animal act andy hybrid pigs  (Read 4125 times)

harmony

  • Joined Feb 2012
Re: Dangerous Animal act andy hybrid pigs
« Reply #30 on: January 27, 2020, 05:38:08 pm »

SmallWelshBarn, I'm sorry to use your post for this but, without the intention of starting any arguments- this is a forum!
People have different experiences, get mad about different things and have strong opinions about them. It's okay to need to have a rant or share with someone your own frustration and have a rant back! Everybody has different opinions, and often opposing,  but that should be respected. Obviously nobody wants to offend anyone but equally if you choose to be part of a forum like this you have to expect that someone will have a view about something that is very different to yours. As long as your words are not being directed against a particular member it is okay to express different opinions, no matter how strongly you feel about them!



I don't think any of the above excuses your comment at all. I agree your comment may not have been directed at a member but how do you know that members on here aren't footpath officers, or their family and friends so actually comments like yours can be offensive to members.

gilesm

  • Joined May 2016
Re: Dangerous Animal act andy hybrid pigs
« Reply #31 on: January 30, 2020, 09:11:04 am »
I watched the Youtube video, which shows a nice set-up.

To allow pig movements, as the pigs aren't that big, could you consider a "pig underpass"?  Wouldn't take long with a small digger to put a big drainage pipe underneath the footpath for the pigs to pass through, in a suitable location.  It could even become a tourist attraction in its own right in time!

I assume you'd need to liaise with the council to divert the walkers through your field for a few hours, but this might be taken as evidence for you to be working WITH the council to come to a satisfactory conclusion.  I think a speedy conclusion will be in everyone's interests.

harmony

  • Joined Feb 2012
Re: Dangerous Animal act andy hybrid pigs
« Reply #32 on: January 30, 2020, 10:23:10 am »
I watched the Youtube video, which shows a nice set-up.

To allow pig movements, as the pigs aren't that big, could you consider a "pig underpass"?  Wouldn't take long with a small digger to put a big drainage pipe underneath the footpath for the pigs to pass through, in a suitable location.  It could even become a tourist attraction in its own right in time!

I assume you'd need to liaise with the council to divert the walkers through your field for a few hours, but this might be taken as evidence for you to be working WITH the council to come to a satisfactory conclusion.  I think a speedy conclusion will be in everyone's interests.



Those pigs are pretty big and still growing. The inside of drainage pipes are smooth. The risk of slipping imo is too high. It would have to be big enough for pigs to turn and pass without getting stuck. That is a pretty big pipe. It would have to be concrete I would think. Then you have to prevent soil, water etc going in.  :thinking: A lot of work.

SmallWelshBarn

  • Joined Sep 2014
Re: Dangerous Animal act andy hybrid pigs
« Reply #33 on: February 14, 2020, 11:45:54 am »
I have received a call from the animal control officer to confirm my pigs are not first generation hybrids as they have confirmed that the boar in the Forest of Dean are all ready hybrids.
Which is what I had already been arguing.
In relation to the foot path the officer and I have come to the solution to fit a type of cattle grid narrower bars in this case. Animals won’t be able to cross but humans can.
Has any one any experience with a smaller version of a cattle grid and would that work for pigs ?

harmony

  • Joined Feb 2012
Re: Dangerous Animal act andy hybrid pigs
« Reply #34 on: February 14, 2020, 03:20:25 pm »
That's a relief for you. Re cattle grid/pig grid, I have never seen one used for pigs. Not sure if there is one or you just get one made to spec. Sounds expensive compared to a couple of gates. Would pigs respect it or end up stuck in it? Mmmm, not be my choice.

arobwk

  • Joined Nov 2015
  • Kernow. Some say it's in England !
Re: Dangerous Animal act andy hybrid pigs
« Reply #35 on: February 14, 2020, 10:48:02 pm »
That's a relief for you. Re cattle grid/pig grid, I have never seen one used for pigs. Not sure if there is one or you just get one made to spec. Sounds expensive compared to a couple of gates. Would pigs respect it or end up stuck in it? Mmmm, not be my choice.

@SmallWelshBarn  I'm assuming you are thinking about a piggy-crossing across the footpath for the pigs to use unhindered with a pig-grid either side to prevent them running off along the footpath:  if that is the case then I can only agree with harmony's remarks.   

SmallWelshBarn

  • Joined Sep 2014
Re: Dangerous Animal act andy hybrid pigs
« Reply #36 on: February 15, 2020, 12:08:10 am »
They won’t let me have gates that’s what I wanted  hence the option of grid.
 

arobwk

  • Joined Nov 2015
  • Kernow. Some say it's in England !
Re: Dangerous Animal act andy hybrid pigs
« Reply #37 on: February 16, 2020, 04:08:01 pm »
Yeah, I'm getting that @SmallWelshBarn which is why I was previously suggesting putting the gates either side of the pathway rather than across the pathway, thereby dividing your field into 2 separate gated enclosures. 
That would require you to move the pigs every now and then from one enclosure to the other and to provide water to the far enclosure, but it could, on the up side, help each enclosure to recover a bit between piggy visits and avoid the deep churned up mud across the piggy crossing place (as shown in your youtube vid). 

Let's say, however, you put in pig-proof grids (not sure what pig-proof grid spec' would be, but I expect there will be one):  you would need to find way of preventing the deep mud build-up across the path because slippery mud on walkers boots and slippery, wet metal grids might not go together too well (and I note the track-way is on an incline of sorts which might compound the issue of slipperiness).  Also, all that mud would gradually build up in the grid wells.  Plus you would need to ensure that dogs can cross or safely walk around by some means that prevents the pigs doing the same.
(I'm assuming it's not a bridleway!). 

In summary, most pleased 'tis agreed your pigs are not 1st-gen' crosses and that pig-grids might be an option for you, BUT, if I were in your situation, I would simply gate off the two enclosures as per my starter sentence.
 

harmony

  • Joined Feb 2012
Re: Dangerous Animal act andy hybrid pigs
« Reply #38 on: February 16, 2020, 05:44:16 pm »
I do not understand the ROW officer agreeing to grids. Where you have a cattle grid you invariably have an adjacent gate. I would suggest "pig" grids are far more challenging to people with limited mobility and dogs for example than dealing with the existing gates.

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
Re: Dangerous Animal act andy hybrid pigs
« Reply #39 on: February 16, 2020, 05:47:19 pm »
Great news that the pigs are not now under threat of being classed as dangerous wild animals :)


Attached is sketch of how I am seeing what arobwk suggests.  Two gates which swing across the public path to make a temporary corridor while the pigs cross, and are then closed off again. 

If it is not meeting your needs then I think perhaps the issue is that you want the pigs to be able to move freely between the two areas at all times? 
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cow, beef cattle, pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

Womble

  • Joined Mar 2009
  • Stirlingshire, Central Scotland
Re: Dangerous Animal act andy hybrid pigs
« Reply #40 on: February 17, 2020, 12:29:35 am »
Thinking about it, a pig grid is going to be quite a costly thing to dig in, and wouldn't you need two of them anyway?

Could you perhaps build a piggy underpass out of a large diameter pipe instead?  You could then half dig that in across the footpath, and half fill in above it to give a little hump that people can walk over. Does that make any sense at all?
"All fungi are edible. Some fungi are only edible once." -Terry Pratchett

SmallWelshBarn

  • Joined Sep 2014
Re: Dangerous Animal act andy hybrid pigs
« Reply #41 on: February 17, 2020, 10:49:05 am »
An underpass would be far to costly full with water and I’m not going down that route.
Yes I will need to grids that I can make my self welding and fabricating is not an issue. In relation to dogs they have no rights on a path and are not a priority. I want to manage and use my land as I see fit whilst meeting my legal obligations. Frankly I would rather no dogs do better MY land having them clear up dog crap or dispose of dog crap in left bags is not a job I enjoy.
I walk in my local forest and you see bags of dog crap tied to trees it’s horrid.
Lastly in the past I have had dog attacks on sheep so am toying with grids on all gate entry and a exit points on my land.
Styles are no longer an option unfortunately.

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
Re: Dangerous Animal act andy hybrid pigs
« Reply #42 on: February 17, 2020, 12:03:32 pm »
The National Trail website says

Quote
Your dog is welcome on Offa's Dyke Path. You will need to keep it under close control and we would recommend a lead when passing through areas where stock are grazing. There are stiles on the route and your dog will need to be able to cross them.

So a) they may not be happy with grids which dogs can't cross (but read on), and b) I wonder why they've told you no stiles when there are some on the trail already?

In terms of making grids dog-friendly, I can think of two options.  Planks or roll-out mats that make a solid walkway across the grids, or dog gates (like the ones some landowners put alongside stiles, where the walker lifts a wooden slat to reveal a dog-sized hole) alongside the grids.  If your intention is to have the pigs free to cross the path at any time, then the plank / mat solution would be too risky as if a walker left them down, the pigs could escape.  And I suppose there is also a risk that the pigs would get their noses under the slat in the dog gate, so it would need to have a self-locking arrangement at the top to prevent it being opened from the bottom.

I do understand landowners who prefer dogs to not use their land, I really do - we had at least one incident every single year on the farm on Hadrian's Wall - but even so, I wouldn't want to see the rights of the public to use rights of way impeded.  I totally agree that some dog walkers are an utter nuisance, though :/
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cow, beef cattle, pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

harmony

  • Joined Feb 2012
Re: Dangerous Animal act andy hybrid pigs
« Reply #43 on: February 17, 2020, 12:52:34 pm »
The National Trail website says

Quote
Your dog is welcome on Offa's Dyke Path. You will need to keep it under close control and we would recommend a lead when passing through areas where stock are grazing. There are stiles on the route and your dog will need to be able to cross them.

So a) they may not be happy with grids which dogs can't cross (but read on), and b) I wonder why they've told you no stiles when there are some on the trail already?




The policy of LA's is to generally avoid new stiles where possible and replace existing ones with gates when they need replacing, if landowner agrees. Nothing to do with dogs but stiles are difficult for some people with mobility issues. I suppose what a grid does rather than a gate is allow unhindered passage along the right of way.


I'm still trying to het my head around what will be safe for pigs in terms of spacing.

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
Re: Dangerous Animal act andy hybrid pigs
« Reply #44 on: February 17, 2020, 12:54:07 pm »

The policy of LA's is to generally avoid new stiles where possible and replace existing ones with gates when they need replacing, if landowner agrees. Nothing to do with dogs but stiles are difficult for some people with mobility issues. I suppose what a grid does rather than a gate is allow unhindered passage along the right of way.

But they've told him he can't have gates!!  ::)

(Frustration at the footpath people, not at you, harmony!)
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cow, beef cattle, pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

 

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