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Author Topic: STOCK BLACKFORD FARM THE VERY BEST IN HIGHLANDS SCOTLAND  (Read 4260 times)

Victorian Farmer

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STOCK BLACKFORD FARM THE VERY BEST IN HIGHLANDS SCOTLAND
« on: October 23, 2013, 10:39:05 am »
Netherton Red Essence H483 sells to Highland Wagyu                                                                    In a quest to establish a high quality red herd of Angus cattle, Moshin and Martine Altajir of Highland Wagyu have purchased in a private deal the foundation Red Angus female Netherton Red Essence H483 and two of her TLA Northern Samurai daughters from the Netherton herd of Messrs W and D McLaren.             A Scottish farm is aiming to become Europe’s largest producer of the world’s most expensive beef.
Highland Wagyu, based on a Perthshire farm, bought a 300-strong herd of the Japanese breed, famous for a meat which the owners say can fetch up to £250 a kilo.
Owners Mohsin and Martine Altajir, from Blackford Farms, said the new herd will join their own “McWagyu” animals next week. The herd is expected to grow to about 1,500 by the end of next year.
Mr Altajir said: “I believe that Wagyu is the best beef in the world and the future of the beef industry in this country.
« Last Edit: October 23, 2013, 11:01:20 am by Victorian Farmer »
Voss Electric Fence

Victorian Farmer

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Re: STOCK BLACKFORD FARM THE VERY BEST IN HIGHLANDS SCOTLAND
« Reply #1 on: October 23, 2013, 11:08:58 am »
in 2012 we have seen prize winning caws sell to one farm, it must be the most expensive set up in the  uk europe the queen has a big colection but nothink on this scale .Its all happend in 18 months buildings like you have ever seen .Stock you would die for there is 3 farms in the highlands 3 separate farmers this is just one blackford farm .The BUILDINGS transport etc masive investment                      Scotland is set to be the home of the largest Japanese Wagyu beef production in Europe by the end of 2014 as a Perthshire farm announces a major expansion to its operation.
Highland Wagyu, owned and run by husband and wife team Mohsin and Martine Altajir from Blackford Farms a 25,000 acre estate situated in Perthshire, has acquired the entire herd of 300 Wagyu cattle from David Ismail of Fordel, Glenfarg in Perthshire for an undisclosed sum.
The acquisition makes it the UK’s largest producer of Japanese Fullblood Wagyu beef, the world’s most expensive beef, which is famous for its highly marbled, tender meat that fetches up to £250 pounds a kilo.
The Highland Wagyu herd of 100 Wagyus with 150 in calf – fondly referred to as McWagyu – will be joined by the Fordel herd from next week.
The expanded operation is on course to reach 700 head of cattle by September, 1000 in the new year and around 1500 at the end of 2014.
Mohsin Altajir said: “I believe that Wagyu is the best beef in the world and the future of the beef industry in this country. We will make Scotland the Wagyu centre of Europe.
“The Fordel herd has the ultimate high grade Blackmore genetics from Australia, renowned to be the best outside Japan. David sold us our first 100% Fullblood Wagyu bulls and females to get us started two years ago and it snowballed from there, so we couldn’t let his herd go to anyone else.”
Martine Altajir said: “Wagyus are seen as delicate cattle but they’re flourishing on the Perthshire grassland. We feel it’s the best place to breed the animals and we’ve invested in creating the right buildings to house them. We’re focusing heavily on breeding fullblood Wagyu using native animals, who make excellent surrogate mothers, but we’ve also started to cross our Wagyu with other breeds on the farm with much success.”
David Ismail of Fordel said: “I am happy to see after a lot of dedication that my herd has gone to a family that are truly passionate about the Wagyu breed, and I’m sure Mohsin and Martine will be very successful in their quest to centralise Wagyu breeding in Scotland. I wish them the best of luck.”Wagyu beef is sold in many of the country's top restaurants and is renowned for its marbling, a sign of quality and something that gives the meat taste.
Tony Linley runs the Ryther Arms traditional pub and steakhouse near York. He put Wagyu beef on his menu before Christmas. It cost £59 for a 16 ounce sirloin steak.
"It's all about the fat content in the beef, Wagyu has got a really strong fat content, more of a creamy, milky fat content and that's what gives it's flavour and texture."
He said despite the price it had proved very popular.
"The rich taste and high fat content do mean you've got be a steak lover to try it. But it sold out in four days and the people who had it thought it was fantastic.
« Last Edit: October 23, 2013, 11:24:29 am by Victorian Farmer »

Victorian Farmer

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Re: STOCK BLACKFORD FARM THE VERY BEST IN HIGHLANDS SCOTLAND
« Reply #2 on: October 23, 2013, 11:28:33 am »
To keep the cattle happy -- and ensure the beef tastes good -- they feed the herd with seaweed and Omega three. They cut the hay to a certain length so the cows don't have to chew too much.
Lighting in the cow's sheds, I am told, "is done properly." In other words -- it's mood lighting.
They're considering playing music too, so the cows feel relaxed. Chapman, who seems to know most cows by name, evens brushes them.
They feed the Wagyu a special low energy concentrate, which costs $1,500 per animal per year. With straw, grain, labor and other costs, it's not a cheap business.
But there's logic behind this unorthodox farming. This strict regime, similar to that of a yoga retreat, improves the quality of the marbling and the animals' fertility rates.
Each animal can sell for more than $12,000, and with Michelin star chefs adding more Wagyu to their menus, this may just help entice other Scottish producers to start breeding the beef too .we could have the best sheep and cattle in one small place in the highlands of scotland even erope just fantastic iv seen this farm as well as the queens stock .I just carnt belive the money being spent on these 3 farms .
« Last Edit: October 23, 2013, 11:55:47 am by Victorian Farmer »

HappyHippy

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Re: STOCK BLACKFORD FARM THE VERY BEST IN HIGHLANDS SCOTLAND
« Reply #3 on: October 23, 2013, 03:00:11 pm »
I'd love to taste some Wagu beef  :yum:
Apparently out in Japan it's quite common for them to have been massaged throughout their life (but that could just be an urban myth  ;))

Be interesting to see how it pans out.
Karen

domsmith

  • Joined Aug 2012
  • sanquhar, dumfries and galloway
    • sunnyside farm
Re: STOCK BLACKFORD FARM THE VERY BEST IN HIGHLANDS SCOTLAND
« Reply #4 on: October 23, 2013, 07:19:22 pm »
they seem to be making a splash.

this is big business with a hint of money is no object. i heard they had spent around 10 million so far on the project.

good luck to them and it can only be good for the scotch beef brand.

have had wagyu, a great eating experience from the steaks, but i had some flank and it was good but only down to the cooking not because it was wagyu, any good beef would have been the same.
not worth the price in my view.

d

Factotum

  • Joined Jun 2012
Re: STOCK BLACKFORD FARM THE VERY BEST IN HIGHLANDS SCOTLAND
« Reply #5 on: October 23, 2013, 11:23:29 pm »
They were on Landward last week I think - Nick Nairn was raving about some stewed bit he was eating.

The lady who breeds then kept talking about their cattle being kept differently to 'traditional' cattle. I'm sure she meant commercial cattle.

They were also going on about the marbled meat - the pictures didn't look that much different to our Shetland beef - & Shetlands are much easier to keep, don't need 'mood music' played to them in the shed nor do they need their food cut up into equal pieces so they don't have to chew too much! Good grief...

OK we look after our cattle, but mood music - what ever next?

Sue




Ina

  • Joined Feb 2012
  • South Aberdeenshire
Re: STOCK BLACKFORD FARM THE VERY BEST IN HIGHLANDS SCOTLAND
« Reply #6 on: October 24, 2013, 05:38:36 am »
- & Shetlands are much easier to keep, don't need 'mood music' played to them in the shed nor do they need their food cut up into equal pieces so they don't have to chew too much! Good grief...


I wonder whether they asked each one of their cattle if they liked the music? Cattle aren't that much different from humans in that they are each different; I personally hate music of any kind forced on me - I'm sure there are some cows in that barn thinking "when will that bl**dy music stop"! ;)

I'm all for treating your livestock nicely, but - well, for me that means more treating them as naturally as possible, allowing them what they would plump for themselves if they lived out in the wild, while helping them if they fall ill...

domsmith

  • Joined Aug 2012
  • sanquhar, dumfries and galloway
    • sunnyside farm
Re: STOCK BLACKFORD FARM THE VERY BEST IN HIGHLANDS SCOTLAND
« Reply #7 on: October 24, 2013, 11:39:17 am »
these things take around 600 days finishing on a cereal diet. nothing natural about it. they are massive and very fat when finished. as i understand it, they dont see the light of day from weaning to slaughter. not want i want

d

Victorian Farmer

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Re: STOCK BLACKFORD FARM THE VERY BEST IN HIGHLANDS SCOTLAND
« Reply #8 on: October 24, 2013, 08:29:30 pm »
I don't no why they need so meney good bulls .The red highlands are being crossed with wague .The stems wague from Australia at 750 pounds then put in there caws .The other small farm bought  3 bulls for a 1000 thousand this week .I thort money was tight.

Victorian Farmer

  • Guest
Re: STOCK BLACKFORD FARM THE VERY BEST IN HIGHLANDS SCOTLAND
« Reply #9 on: October 30, 2013, 11:49:32 am »
2 more bulls bought this week from sterling alive Eton and milerton irani fizz  out standing short horn .
« Last Edit: November 02, 2013, 08:00:02 pm by Victorian Farmer »

lachlanandmarcus

  • Joined Aug 2010
  • Aberdeenshire
Re: STOCK BLACKFORD FARM THE VERY BEST IN HIGHLANDS SCOTLAND
« Reply #10 on: November 12, 2013, 07:48:39 pm »
Like that shorthorn, very nice :thumbsup:

 

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