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Author Topic: highland cattle  (Read 30347 times)

The Chicken Lady

  • Joined Mar 2008
  • Cheshire
highland cattle
« on: March 19, 2008, 06:25:14 pm »
I am thinking of getting two calves - any suggestions where to start?
Karen
Voss Electric Fence

Rosemary

  • Joined Oct 2007
  • Barry, Angus, Scotland
    • The Accidental Smallholder
Re: highland cattle
« Reply #1 on: March 19, 2008, 07:37:46 pm »
The breed society is always a good place to start.

Our smallholders' association visted the Torrie fold on Highlands on Sunday - some lovely cattle, especially Hunny Bunny, a little ginger yearling. I was, however, strictly forbidden to bring anything alive home. So had some pies instead.

The Chicken Lady

  • Joined Mar 2008
  • Cheshire
Re: highland cattle
« Reply #2 on: March 21, 2008, 08:04:43 am »
That's a problem with highland cattle - you can't get them in your boot! I regularly go to look at poultry at our local market. I say I am just going to look but always come back with something in the boot. Even the children say as I pull into the yard "what have you bought now" Once I fooled them though I didn't buy anything!
Karen

ruives

  • Joined Mar 2008
  • Arbroath
Re: highland cattle
« Reply #3 on: April 01, 2008, 11:33:50 am »
I just picked up two steer calves the other week both about 6 months old and debudded, very small and very cute!

I had bought three heifers a few years ago at the local Highland Cattle sale, they were about 12 months old with horns.

In the short time I've had the new additions, I would say they are easier to handle and have been very easy to haulter train them.  The horns isn't the problem as at that age they are wee stumps anyway it is is the size of the calves.  That few extra months meant they were bigger, stronger and more weary of people.

This time round I have had the luxury of a small cattle pen consisting of 4 cattle gates, I am able to get the calves into this pen and using their feeding trugs as bait, I can put their haulters over them.  During which time I brush them all over so they get used to human contact, this is with the foresight if I need to get a vet to look at them (the last three never needed the vet).

This time of year is perfect for getting them as they will have Mother Nature on their side with regards to grass and weather

I had suggested in the "Marketplace" about the Perth Sale coming up shortly, but see you are based in Cheshire, might be a bit far for you?  There may be similar markets down nearer you?  The other option is the Society's website, they have a sales section that may interest you as some of the cattle are in South of the Border here's the link for you http://www.highlandcattlesociety.com/for_sale_wanted.php

I am no means an expert but would say that of all the animals I have, which include Ducks, Geese, Turkeys, Guinea Fowl, Chickens, Cats, Dogs and now 2 Tamworths, they are the easiest to look after :- as long as they have enough space, grass and water they are very contented and very appealing to look at.

Hope this helps a wee bit?

Happyhens

  • Joined Jan 2008
Re: highland cattle
« Reply #4 on: April 09, 2008, 07:21:05 am »

 ;)If you would like to e-mail me then I might be able to help, we have milking cows and calves also some fattening Bullocks.

Regards

J.

Rosemary

  • Joined Oct 2007
  • Barry, Angus, Scotland
    • The Accidental Smallholder
Re: highland cattle
« Reply #5 on: April 09, 2008, 01:55:56 pm »
There is a couple of adverts in Farmers Guardian this week - Highland young stock in Lancashire, North Cornwall, Northumberland (heifers) and an 01524 number (why don't folk put where they are?).

The Chicken Lady

  • Joined Mar 2008
  • Cheshire
Re: highland cattle
« Reply #6 on: April 10, 2008, 01:47:22 am »
Thanks for your help. I am still looking. I tried someone more laocal last weekend but he could not sell any as he has a case of TB  :'(
Karen

Wildman

  • Joined Apr 2008
Re: highland cattle
« Reply #7 on: June 07, 2008, 09:29:44 pm »
How long do you keep them for, how much do they cost to buy. I am looking at what stock we would like to keep, we have piges and chicks etc but looking at a few bullocks, would like to know as much as poss about them.

Wildman

  • Joined Apr 2008
Re: highland cattle
« Reply #8 on: June 12, 2008, 08:20:32 pm »
Can anyone help with the above information????????????

The Chicken Lady

  • Joined Mar 2008
  • Cheshire
Re: highland cattle
« Reply #9 on: June 16, 2008, 04:02:55 pm »
I don't have highland cattle yet but am looking to purchase in the near future. Apparently they are easy to keep as they will thrive on poor grass. They can live out all year round. Despite their appearance they are placid gentle cows - good mothers. You have to slaughter before 30 months for the food chain however I have heard that you can slaughter later but they have to be tested for something or other and only certain slaughter houses are allowed to do this after thirty months. Do you want to know anything else?  :cow: :)
Karen

Wildman

  • Joined Apr 2008
Re: highland cattle
« Reply #10 on: June 16, 2008, 07:01:21 pm »
Thank you for all that info, do you know what the cost per animal would be to buy?

Rosemary

  • Joined Oct 2007
  • Barry, Angus, Scotland
    • The Accidental Smallholder
Re: highland cattle
« Reply #11 on: June 16, 2008, 08:06:24 pm »
Is it only Highland cattle you are interested in? If you want to start cheap, you would get baby calves from £50 (Holstein bulls) to £180 for continental cross bulls. Bucket feed them to 12 weeks and fatten them on. Locally, store cattle were selling for £536 per head (6-12 months). You would probably be killling continental crosses at 18 - 24 months.

Wildman

  • Joined Apr 2008
Re: highland cattle
« Reply #12 on: June 16, 2008, 10:10:13 pm »
Not just Highland, any would do. My friend had dexters but stopped due to paper work out of date and he lost the lot, never again he said.

The Chicken Lady

  • Joined Mar 2008
  • Cheshire
Re: highland cattle
« Reply #13 on: June 19, 2008, 09:54:09 am »
The cost will vary depending on age and pedigree. A yearling can cost around £250 although occasionally I see some for £150. Cows for breeding cost £450 upwards. I do know where a cow with calf at foot will cost £600 :cow:  :) You could have a look on www.themerecastonfold.com
« Last Edit: June 19, 2008, 09:58:19 am by The Chicken Lady »
Karen

Wildman

  • Joined Apr 2008
Re: highland cattle
« Reply #14 on: June 19, 2008, 09:51:47 pm »
Thank you for the info, Chicken Lady your link did not work?

 

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