Smallholders Insurance from Greenlands

Author Topic: Advice on my poultry book  (Read 17363 times)

Sylvia

  • Joined Aug 2009
Re: Advice on my poultry book
« Reply #15 on: March 16, 2012, 02:06:35 pm »
Good luck :thumbsup: The sort of folk who would buy your book are the sort of folk who buy poultry magazines and Goodness knows they sell well :)

chrismahon

  • Joined Dec 2011
  • Gascony, France
Re: Advice on my poultry book
« Reply #16 on: March 16, 2012, 04:02:05 pm »
Go for it Buffy. I'll buy one. I always work on the basis that if the book tells me just one thing I don't know which will assist in welfare, productivity or economy, it has paid for itself.

funkyfish

  • Joined Nov 2011
  • Devon
Re: Advice on my poultry book
« Reply #17 on: March 17, 2012, 11:21:59 am »
Let me know when it's out! As a behaviourist I'm always wanting to learn more about different species! I have yet to clicker train my birds but an looking forward to having a go- hopefully it will sharpen mento as a dog trainer! Many dog trainers work with chickens first.
Old and rare breed Ducks, chickens, geese, sheep, guinea pigs, 3 dogs, 3 cats, husband and chicks brooding in the tv cabinate!

Buffy the eggs layer

  • Joined Jun 2010
Re: Advice on my poultry book
« Reply #18 on: March 19, 2012, 09:16:50 am »
Hi funky fish,

                    I have done a bit of dog training myself, obedience, agility and man work. I have also trained horses, house rabbits and recently started with cats.

                   I don't use clickers as I prefer to use a more natural approach of voice, body language and contact. I am self taught but tend to take a "Whisperer" approach. Hens like dogs will respond quickly to training and are very bright so clicker training will be easy. Having said that I would recommend that you chose a smart but placid breed to begin with as I have found results vary dramatically.

                    The flight instinct is so prevalent in chickens and an anxious pupil struggles to learn. I have worked with Sussex, Wyandotte, Plymouth rock, Brahma, marans cross and my favorite Croad Langshan. The Croads are by far the most engaging, inquisitive and confiding which makes them great fun to train.

I don't train "tricks" but the croads often invent their own in order to get attention and their trusting and confident nature means that they are happy to spend time away from the flock learning new things. I find that their confidence allows them to stay calm and work things out rather than getting distressed easily and acting in panic.

                  Training chickens is a little like training horses as the drivers are similar as opposed to the drivers in dogs. I also find that training chickens is a thing that can continue throughout their lives however training cockerels requires a slightly different approach and is easier to continue if they do not have a harem. Having said that they have excellent memories and great spatial awareness so once they have learnt something its easy to pick it back up several months later and build on it.

                  The training advice in the book is kept simple and to the basics as I don't find that many people are even interested in training their dogs effectively let alone their chickens. Perhaps I need to rethink?

                Great to get such positive feedback from those of you who are interested in training and learning from your birds.

Buffy

chrismahon

  • Joined Dec 2011
  • Gascony, France
Re: Advice on my poultry book
« Reply #19 on: March 20, 2012, 08:33:13 am »
I think the market for this book is perhaps much bigger than you think Buffy.

We did well with Frankie, Gold Laced Wyandotte Cockerel. Became very friendly. But then he met his girls !

Bert

  • Joined Jan 2012
  • Isle of Mull
Re: Advice on my poultry book
« Reply #20 on: March 20, 2012, 09:36:12 am »
Hi Buffy the eggs layer
Please please please get your book out in print. I would love to know what's going on inside my chickens heads ???. At the moment they seem more like a group of misunderstood teenagers. ;D Example Why is it more fun to be in next doors garden (who don't mind, thank god) or crossing the road ( very quiet,but not the point) to spend the day on the beach playing in seaweed Rather than staying in the 6 acre field they have access to?

northfifeduckling

  • Joined Jan 2009
  • Fife
    • North Fife Blog
Re: Advice on my poultry book
« Reply #21 on: March 20, 2012, 09:53:20 am »
Hi Buffy the eggs layer
Please please please get your book out in print. I would love to know what's going on inside my chickens heads ???. At the moment they seem more like a group of misunderstood teenagers. ;D Example Why is it more fun to be in next doors garden (who don't mind, thank god) or crossing the road ( very quiet,but not the point) to spend the day on the beach playing in seaweed Rather than staying in the 6 acre field they have access to?

EXACTLY - and why have mine after 2 1/2 years decided that the space they have occupied so far is no longer adequate??? :chook: :&>

Bramblecot

  • Joined Jul 2008
Re: Advice on my poultry book
« Reply #22 on: March 20, 2012, 11:48:49 am »
Buffy, I need your book - soon.

Please can you talk to the ex-batt   :chook: who has just walked through the utility room, then kitchen, down the hall, climbed over two dogs in their beds, and jumped onto the 'in' tray in the office.  I found her walking up and down the windowsill.  Another has just flown over a 6ft fence and there is one on the top of my rotary washing line.   ::) A madhouse.  ;D

funkyfish

  • Joined Nov 2011
  • Devon
Re: Advice on my poultry book
« Reply #23 on: March 20, 2012, 01:59:58 pm »
Thanks for the advice! Just re read my post- wow there are some great autocorrect spellings! Damn phone hate it!
Old and rare breed Ducks, chickens, geese, sheep, guinea pigs, 3 dogs, 3 cats, husband and chicks brooding in the tv cabinate!

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
    • Trelay Cohousing Community
Re: Advice on my poultry book
« Reply #24 on: March 21, 2012, 12:27:32 am »
Just re read my post- wow there are some great autocorrect spellings! Damn phone hate it!

I had the following in an email from a friend:
Quote
Hope all continues to go well with the lambing and calving (iPad keeps correcting this to carving, which is anticipating things rather!)
  :D :D :D
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cows (rearing their own calves for beef), pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

Buffy the eggs layer

  • Joined Jun 2010
Re: Advice on my poultry book
« Reply #25 on: March 21, 2012, 09:33:58 pm »
Goodness guys!

  Its great to come across so many of you who are interested in the book. As a result I will do some more work on it and add more behavour / training information before I send it to a uk publisher.

Bert,

  in answer to your question as chickens drivers are based on survival then their main motivators are nutrition and reproduction then lets start with these as the reason that your chickens stray. They usually seek new teratory in an attempt to find more food or a greater variety of food or to find a new breeding enviroment with a more suitable mate or less competition for them feed themselves or their young. In the wild they would branch off and form new groups and claim new teratories.

Other factors too are important to their health and safety such as shelter and the security of a social group. So a bird which is victimised by others or is prevented from accessing the coop or nest box will venture further a field.

They are also inteligent and inquisitive so if rumaging through seaweed is more entertaining and nutritionaly satisfying than staying at home then they will visit the beach. They have a keen sense of smell and a good memory so if the smell of rotting fish wafts their way they will remember where it came from and rush off to play on the sand.

Making their home as close to a natural enviroment as possible will go a long way to keeping them from straying. Shrubs, trees, dust baths, leaf litter, grass, insects, worms, shelter, shade, space, multiple feed stations, fresh water and new teratory are all important. The area that they occupy can become over grazed, soured by droppings and bug free. Keeping an area sectioned off and allowing them access every so often can help with this along with adding stimulating eliments to a stark or sterile enviroment.

Bramblecot,

             again this inquisitive nature and a desire to find food and the best place to roost or lay will bring them indoors. I have heard of one who used to come in via the cat flap and lay her eggs in the dogs basket. And one who liked to sit on the worktop behind a portable tv and snooze.

          The more scope they have, the more you get to see how much they take in and the choices that they make. I have a couple who like to sit under my chair and snooze. Not too bad when its the garden chair but when its in the kitchen it really confuses the cats! :cat: :chook: :cat: 

Buffy

Sylvia

  • Joined Aug 2009
Re: Advice on my poultry book
« Reply #26 on: March 22, 2012, 07:33:22 am »
Oh, I am looking forward to this book! :)

Bert

  • Joined Jan 2012
  • Isle of Mull
Re: Advice on my poultry book
« Reply #27 on: March 22, 2012, 07:57:46 am »
Thanks Buffy :thumbsup:. :chook: :chook:
I would also like to second what sylvia said :thumbsup:

Buffy the eggs layer

  • Joined Jun 2010
Re: Advice on my poultry book
« Reply #28 on: March 23, 2012, 08:17:25 am »
Hi Guys,

  I have had an idea. Why dont you let me know what chicken behaviours you would like to understand and I will aim to cover them in the book. Bert has asked about straying / escaping and Bramblecoot about exploring / venturing indoors which I will now devote a chapter to.

If any of you can think of other topics that owners would like info on then please let me know.

Buffy

chrismahon

  • Joined Dec 2011
  • Gascony, France
Re: Advice on my poultry book
« Reply #29 on: March 25, 2012, 09:25:53 pm »
Hi Buffy. Why does our pet cockerel Bottom want so many cuddles? All he wants to do when he gets in is go to sleep under my wife's arm. When he is ready for a cuddle he either pecks lightly on your leg or starts looking frantically at the ceiling in different directions as if to say "I can't see the sun so it must be cuddle time".

Or perhaps pet cockerel behaviour is a bit 'off track' for your book.

 

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