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Author Topic: Keeping a ewe that had mastitis separate - how long?  (Read 1107 times)

JFW67

  • Joined Apr 2020
  • Co. Derry
    • Valkyrie Craft: Handmade Canoes and Kayaks
Keeping a ewe that had mastitis separate - how long?
« on: May 21, 2024, 08:49:25 am »
One of my ewes had mastitis which was treated.  She has been kept separate from the other lambs and mothers because I was told potentially bacteria could spread from her to others via lambs stealing from other ewes.

She has been separate, with her lamb and two other yearlings, for about 7 weeks now.  This is possible to maintain but makes juggling pasture space very problematic, effectively putting one field out of action.

Any suggestions/advice on returning them to the flock?
Mistakes teach best.  😳🙄😉

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
    • Trelay Cohousing Community
Re: Keeping a ewe that had mastitis separate - how long?
« Reply #1 on: May 22, 2024, 12:48:53 am »
If she's had antibiotics and the udder is now uninfected, I'd say she can go back with the others. 

Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cows (rearing their own calves for beef), pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

twizzel

  • Joined Apr 2012
Re: Keeping a ewe that had mastitis separate - how long?
« Reply #2 on: May 22, 2024, 06:51:34 am »
I agree with sally, as long as it’s not oozing any infectious liquid. But dont breed her again, she will be an infection risk to the other ewes and likely get mastitis again.

JFW67

  • Joined Apr 2020
  • Co. Derry
    • Valkyrie Craft: Handmade Canoes and Kayaks
Re: Keeping a ewe that had mastitis separate - how long?
« Reply #3 on: May 22, 2024, 08:38:47 am »
Thanks for the reply Sally and Twizzel.

Her udder still feels a bit odd but no sign of any discharge for weeks.

Twizzel - Why sill she be a potential risk in the future?  Is this because she will be more prone to mastitis or residual bacteria from the bought?

Thanks again.

Mistakes teach best.  😳🙄😉

twizzel

  • Joined Apr 2012
Re: Keeping a ewe that had mastitis separate - how long?
« Reply #4 on: May 22, 2024, 01:03:47 pm »
Thanks for the reply Sally and Twizzel.

Her udder still feels a bit odd but no sign of any discharge for weeks.

Twizzel - Why sill she be a potential risk in the future?  Is this because she will be more prone to mastitis or residual bacteria from the bought?

Thanks again.


The side(s) of the udder that had mastitis will never feel right again, she’s likely got damage to the tissue inside the udder and possibly some residual, walled off infection (especially if the udder is lumpy) that will probably cause mastitis again next lactation, which isn’t nice for her and poses a big risk to the rest of your flock. Generally with mastitis the aim is to save the ewe, rather than the udder.

JFW67

  • Joined Apr 2020
  • Co. Derry
    • Valkyrie Craft: Handmade Canoes and Kayaks
Re: Keeping a ewe that had mastitis separate - how long?
« Reply #5 on: May 22, 2024, 02:17:45 pm »
Thanks for the clarrification.   :thumbsup:
Mistakes teach best.  😳🙄😉

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
    • Trelay Cohousing Community
Re: Keeping a ewe that had mastitis separate - how long?
« Reply #6 on: May 23, 2024, 02:18:32 pm »
Plus, my experience is that, once a ewe has had mastitis, even if her udder does come back to looking and feeling normal, it is likely to not be as productive in future, which means hungry lambs, which in itself can cause mastitis (through their interminable grinding on at an empty udder), which is then highly likely to spread (as the hungry lambs pinch milk off other ewes...), and/or you end up with a dead lamb, or a lamb you have to rear on a bottle or foster....  So, even though you can get ewes who recover fully, in practise it is, in my opinion and that of many sheep farmers, best for the flock to cull - or retire - any ewes who've had mastitis once they've reared their current lambs. 

Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cows (rearing their own calves for beef), pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

JFW67

  • Joined Apr 2020
  • Co. Derry
    • Valkyrie Craft: Handmade Canoes and Kayaks
Re: Keeping a ewe that had mastitis separate - how long?
« Reply #7 on: May 23, 2024, 07:40:13 pm »
Thank you Sally.

I have seen this observation a good number of times in my ‘researching’ mastitis these last few weeks.  She won’t be culled but I think retirement is the outcome.

Thanks again
Mistakes teach best.  😳🙄😉

 

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