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Author Topic: White Christmas  (Read 876 times)

Fleecewife

  • Joined May 2010
  • South Lanarkshire
    • Wester Gladstone Hebridean Sheep
Re: White Christmas
« Reply #15 on: November 07, 2020, 12:37:49 am »
We have Latvian friends who have the same surname - almost. The husband's name ends in ski and the wife's ends in ska. Our Polish neighbours both have the same surname. I think that in Ghana the wife keeps the same surname. A Ghanaian friend kept her name but the children had the father's surname and I thought it was just them but her sister did the same. I'm not sure. Anyone know?


MY ex son-in-law is Zimbabwean and his surname is different to his parents and brothers. He said that when children become adults they can choose their own surname.

That's really interesting.  There must be different rules and customs all around the world.
I was reading a book recently where it was mentioned that in the past in (I think) Belgium, women used to sign their names simply as 'eps' (wife) then their husband's name. I get really annoyed when at livestock shows the prize winners are announced by the owner's name, rather than the animal's, but those poor Belgian wives were being subsumed by their husbands and becoming nameless non-persons.
When I got married I was delighted to be rid of my maiden name as I could legitimately dissociate myself from the disreputable menfolk of my birth family just when I needed a new identity  :relief:  :roflanim:
www.scothebs.co.uk

Do something today that your future self will thank you for - plant a tree

Draco dormiens nunquam titillandus - let sleeping dragons lie

doganjo

  • Joined Aug 2012
  • Clackmannanshire
  • Qui? Moi?
    • ABERDON GUNDOGS for work and show
    • Facebook
Re: White Christmas
« Reply #16 on: November 07, 2020, 10:28:22 am »
As an accountant, I and other professionals, have  female colleagues who became qualified prior to marriage.  It was such a faff to get all the certificates and registers changed, not to mention previous accounts signed off, that most of us decided to continue practising in our maiden names.. so effectively we had two lives  :roflanim:  Our professional name and our married name - it's common in the medical profession too
Always have been, always will be, a WYSIWYG - black is black, white is white - no grey in my life! But I'm mellowing in my old age

macgro7

  • Joined Feb 2016
Re: White Christmas
« Reply #17 on: November 07, 2020, 02:03:20 pm »
That's really interesting.  There must be different rules and customs all around the world.
I was reading a book recently where it was mentioned that in the past in (I think) Belgium, women used to sign their names simply as 'eps' (wife) then their husband's name. I get really annoyed when at livestock shows the prize winners are announced by the owner's name, rather than the animal's, but those poor Belgian wives were being subsumed by their husbands and becoming nameless non-persons.
When I got married I was delighted to be rid of my maiden name as I could legitimately dissociate myself from the disreputable menfolk of my birth family just when I needed a new identity  :relief:  :roflanim:
It was the same here untill recently you know - in all ex british empire english speaking countries - dr smith got married and his wife was known as mrs dr smith.
Even now - Prince Michael of Kent - and his wife Princess Michael of Kent.
When a Polish king passed away with hisnonly child being a girl (Princess Jadwiga) she was crowned as Jadwiga the KING of Poland and Hungary. As the law didnt even consider having a Queen as the head of state - only a wife of the king. When she married her husband became the king and she was downgraded to queen.
The word for king in Polish is "król", queen is"królowa", where the "-owa" at the end indicates she is the wife of "król-".
With surnames ending with "-ski" it is pretty simple as "ski" is masculine version and "-ska" would be feminine, i.e. daughters, wifes are all "-ska". However with certain otehr types of Polish surnames, like my maternal grandparents mr Piech and his wife mrs Piech (in passport) but people would often call her mrs Piechowa, i.e. indicating that she ks a wife of mr Piech. My mother would have been miss Piechówna, "-ówna" saying daughet of Piech. Her brother would have been Piechowicz, i.e. son of Piech.

In Polish culture it is not really used any more in our generation, but Russian tend to still use it quite a lot - as well as all the ex Russian subjects and collonies (all over central Asia etc).
Growing loads of fruits and vegetables! Raising dairy goats, chickens, ducks, geese rabbits and a little boy on 1/2 acre in the middle of the city of Leicester, using permaculture methods.

macgro7

  • Joined Feb 2016
Re: White Christmas
« Reply #18 on: November 07, 2020, 02:07:35 pm »
Some other people in the world dont use husbands surnames at all.
 I find it really stupid when i heard of some Polish ladies taking their Arab husbands surname.
She is know now as mrs Mohammed, however in Arab culture surname "Mohammed" is simply his fathers first name. She has definitelly not become daughter of Mohammed, only daughter in law. Arab and Somali women keep their own identity. They are not mrs something, they are still daughters of their fathers.
In Chinese culture it was completely opposite - when a lady gets married her husbands ancestors are supposed to become her ancestors - thats how they see it.
Growing loads of fruits and vegetables! Raising dairy goats, chickens, ducks, geese rabbits and a little boy on 1/2 acre in the middle of the city of Leicester, using permaculture methods.

PK

  • Joined Mar 2015
  • West Suffolk
    • Notes from a Suffolk Smallholding
Re: White Christmas
« Reply #19 on: November 07, 2020, 03:30:13 pm »
In Joseph Heller’s Catch-22 there was famously Major Major Major Major.

Fleecewife

  • Joined May 2010
  • South Lanarkshire
    • Wester Gladstone Hebridean Sheep
Re: White Christmas
« Reply #20 on: November 07, 2020, 04:30:37 pm »
In Joseph Heller’s Catch-22 there was famously Major Major Major Major.

I never did read that book although I think the rest of the World did!
So Major (rank), Major (given name), Major (?), Major (family name) - what was the third 'major'?
I suppose they could have called him John and been EVEN MORE BORING  :eyelashes:
www.scothebs.co.uk

Do something today that your future self will thank you for - plant a tree

Draco dormiens nunquam titillandus - let sleeping dragons lie

Fleecewife

  • Joined May 2010
  • South Lanarkshire
    • Wester Gladstone Hebridean Sheep
Re: White Christmas
« Reply #21 on: November 07, 2020, 04:39:37 pm »
That's really interesting.  There must be different rules and customs all around the world.
I was reading a book recently where it was mentioned that in the past in (I think) Belgium, women used to sign their names simply as 'eps' (wife) then their husband's name. I get really annoyed when at livestock shows the prize winners are announced by the owner's name, rather than the animal's, but those poor Belgian wives were being subsumed by their husbands and becoming nameless non-persons.
When I got married I was delighted to be rid of my maiden name as I could legitimately dissociate myself from the disreputable menfolk of my birth family just when I needed a new identity  :relief: :roflanim:
It was the same here untill recently you know - in all ex british empire english speaking countries - dr smith got married and his wife was known as mrs dr smith.
Even now - Prince Michael of Kent - and his wife Princess Michael of Kent.
When a Polish king passed away with hisnonly child being a girl (Princess Jadwiga) she was crowned as Jadwiga the KING of Poland and Hungary. As the law didnt even consider having a Queen as the head of state - only a wife of the king. When she married her husband became the king and she was downgraded to queen.
The word for king in Polish is "król", queen is"królowa", where the "-owa" at the end indicates she is the wife of "król-".
With surnames ending with "-ski" it is pretty simple as "ski" is masculine version and "-ska" would be feminine, i.e. daughters, wifes are all "-ska". However with certain otehr types of Polish surnames, like my maternal grandparents mr Piech and his wife mrs Piech (in passport) but people would often call her mrs Piechowa, i.e. indicating that she ks a wife of mr Piech. My mother would have been miss Piechówna, "-ówna" saying daughet of Piech. Her brother would have been Piechowicz, i.e. son of Piech.

In Polish culture it is not really used any more in our generation, but Russian tend to still use it quite a lot - as well as all the ex Russian subjects and collonies (all over central Asia etc).

Princess Michael of Kent is now something of an abberration (as in its usage).  As to why Camilla doesn't get called princess I have no (rational) idea.

All the information about Polish and Russian names is fascinating - thank you, I have wondered.  So what scheme is used in modern Poland?

A Polish chap who did some building work for us is called 'Gregor' - a good old Scottish name, but when he spelled it for me in Polish I couldn't understand how that became Gregor - far too many Zs  :coat:  But then I don't speak Polish although I did make a start with Russian at school.
www.scothebs.co.uk

Do something today that your future self will thank you for - plant a tree

Draco dormiens nunquam titillandus - let sleeping dragons lie

PK

  • Joined Mar 2015
  • West Suffolk
    • Notes from a Suffolk Smallholding
Re: White Christmas
« Reply #22 on: November 07, 2020, 05:43:23 pm »
Until relatively recently in posh circles women were often referred to by their husband’s name. Rosemary, for example, would be addressed as Mrs Daniel Champion. Keen gardeners will remember the late Rosemary Verey, the noted plantswoman and garden designer, from her books and TV appearances. She once wrote a book to celebrate female gardeners. Each chapter title was their name: Mrs Andrew Chatto (aka Beth Chatto), Mrs Walter Fish (aka Marjorie Fish) and so on. Rosemary Verey was so posh it seems this bizarrely contradictory way of highlighting the achievements of women did not occur to her or her publisher.

Buttermilk

  • Joined Jul 2014
Re: White Christmas
« Reply #23 on: November 07, 2020, 06:22:51 pm »
Richard Head is a common name, I know of three people with that name.

A Rev. Ball who lived next door to my mother named his children Issac and Isobelle.

Mad Goatwoman of Madeley

  • Joined Sep 2011
  • Telford
Re: White Christmas
« Reply #24 on: November 07, 2020, 10:22:55 pm »
Slightly off piste, my daughter Sorrel is presently dating someone whose family name is Sorrel !!

She'd be in good company. The footballing Neville brothers' dad was Neville Neville!

I'm still working that one out, but, so far, I'm thinking Neville brothers' grand-parents possibly had a wicked sense of humour ???

A patient we had was called Richard Head.  We all thought how unfortunate that was and that his parents could not have realised what they were lumbering their new baby with.  Then we discoved the father's name was also Richard Head, so he was deliberately and knowingly giving his son a lifetime of grief being called Dick Head.  perhaps he thought that if it was good enough for him then his son could survive it too  ???


 :roflanim: :roflanim: :roflanim:

Mad Goatwoman of Madeley

  • Joined Sep 2011
  • Telford
Re: White Christmas
« Reply #25 on: November 07, 2020, 10:30:07 pm »
I once worked with someone who, as a social worker, had dealings with a girl called Iona. Fine if her surname hadn't been Dick.

Fleecewife

  • Joined May 2010
  • South Lanarkshire
    • Wester Gladstone Hebridean Sheep
Re: White Christmas
« Reply #26 on: November 07, 2020, 10:50:44 pm »
I once worked with someone who, as a social worker, had dealings with a girl called Iona. Fine if her surname hadn't been Dick.


Oh thank you so much MGM - I've just finished my post about Mink, then I read this and burst out laughing - cheered me up  ;D
www.scothebs.co.uk

Do something today that your future self will thank you for - plant a tree

Draco dormiens nunquam titillandus - let sleeping dragons lie

Backinwellies

  • Global Moderator
  • Joined Sep 2012
  • Llandeilo Carmarthenshire
    • Nantygroes
    • Facebook
Re: White Christmas
« Reply #27 on: November 08, 2020, 08:20:02 am »
Easy here in Wales .... only about 5 surnames anyway..... and most are also first names too!!   :roflanim: :roflanim:
Linda

Don't wrestle with pigs, they will love it and you will just get all muddy.

Let go of who you are and become who you are meant to be.

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Fleecewife

  • Joined May 2010
  • South Lanarkshire
    • Wester Gladstone Hebridean Sheep
Re: White Christmas
« Reply #28 on: November 09, 2020, 12:38:51 pm »
Easy here in Wales .... only about 5 surnames anyway..... and most are also first names too!!   :roflanim: :roflanim:

But you have qualifiers in Wales: Jones the Post, Jones the Milk, Ivor the Engine and so on  :eyelashes:
www.scothebs.co.uk

Do something today that your future self will thank you for - plant a tree

Draco dormiens nunquam titillandus - let sleeping dragons lie

Steph Hen

  • Joined Jul 2013
  • Angus Scotland.
Re: White Christmas
« Reply #29 on: November 10, 2020, 01:05:25 pm »
Easy here in Wales .... only about 5 surnames anyway..... and most are also first names too!!   :roflanim: :roflanim:

But you have qualifiers in Wales: Jones the Post, Jones the Milk, Ivor the Engine and so on  :eyelashes:

I grew up in South Wales. There were many ‘Dai’s’, so all used their qualifiers. There was even Dai the s**t who emptied septic tanks. This became his everyday name, the abbreviation was ‘Shitty’. Nice guy. I don’t normally swear on the website, but this was the guys name so hope I’ll be be forgiven.

 

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