Smallholders Insurance from Greenlands

Author Topic: Ewes in discomfort  (Read 1375 times)

tommytink

  • Joined Aug 2018
Ewes in discomfort
« on: June 14, 2020, 09:38:41 pm »
Apologies for yet another post. It doesnít rain but it pours  ::)

Last week I noticed two of my ewes sat down, and making groaning noises. They were breathing but then almost holding it and letting it out with a little groan. They both have been fine since, up and grazing etc,  but today found one of them doing it again. Also pretty sure another one not doing it last time was also doing it but sheís more flighty and couldnít get too close. The one Iíve been with today kept belching but not bringing up cud. I was rubbing her tummy as it reminded me of indigestion. Both times itís just after going onto fresh grazing. Is it
Just the new grass?

mab

  • Joined Mar 2009
  • carmarthenshire
Re: Ewes in discomfort
« Reply #1 on: June 14, 2020, 11:19:50 pm »
Just guessing: sounds a bit like almost-bloat? do you have a lot of clover in the new grass? (although I thought that was more of an issue for cows than sheep).


If so I guess as long as they can burp it out they're ok (as opposed to actual bloat when they can't).


Best wait for an answer from someone who knows more.

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
    • Trelay Cohousing Community
Re: Ewes in discomfort
« Reply #2 on: June 15, 2020, 12:36:45 pm »
Yup, sounds exactly like "almost-bloat" - good description!  :)

And yes, sheep can and do get bloat.  Especially going onto fresh, red-clover-rich pasture.

If you get one affected worse than others you can often help by massaging the flanks.  (Left hand side, where the rumen is.)  If not improving and stomach wall feels tight, get the sheep penned on some clean ground so you can see if it's pooping.  If not, or if discomfort is worsening or stomach feels really hard, look up bloat drench on here and give it some.  (Basically a liquid mix of natural yoghurt, veg oil, and ginger.  Add sodium bicarb just as you are about to administer.  And stand back, belches and farts usually ensue!)
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cows (rearing their own calves for beef), pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

tommytink

  • Joined Aug 2018
Re: Ewes in discomfort
« Reply #3 on: June 19, 2020, 12:51:53 pm »
Brilliant, thank you. Coincidentally I was rubbing her tummy (and even the correct side!) as it seemed like indigestion. Her tummy was quite solid but not any more than one of the others. We do have clover but more the white than red and not in a huge abundance. Will remember the bloat drench if it gets to be a problem again. Can it be from over-eating as well? Do sheep do that?!!

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
    • Trelay Cohousing Community
Re: Ewes in discomfort
« Reply #4 on: June 19, 2020, 08:04:30 pm »
Yup, sheep and cattle can overeat.  It's more usually the young ones, or because the pasture is more rich than they're used to - with red clover rich pasture being a common culprit but by no means the only one.
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cows (rearing their own calves for beef), pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

 

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