NFU Mutual Smallholding Insurance

Author Topic: Dog Worms  (Read 444 times)

Argyll

  • Joined May 2019
Dog Worms
« on: May 11, 2019, 05:28:27 pm »
Thoughts please. I would like to use for grazing an area that dogs have used. I am concerned about dog worms being in the ground and then infecting the sheep. Is there any treatment recommend for the ground or sheep?
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shep53

  • Joined Jan 2011
  • Argyll
Re: Dog Worms
« Reply #1 on: May 11, 2019, 07:02:26 pm »
Was recently discussed PAGE 2  APR 27TH   VACCINATIONS FOR LAMBS  but o answer your questions  NO & NO

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
Re: Dog Worms
« Reply #2 on: May 12, 2019, 09:21:18 pm »
The only ways to stop dog worms getting into sheep are

a) keep the dogs worm free by worming
b) pick up all dog poo
c) don’t allow dogs on the ground the sheep will graze

You cannot treat the ground and you cannot treat the sheep.

We use a+b.

While we are on the subject - does anyone know how long the ground would remain contaminated?  We have one area where our holiday guests walk their dogs, but are thinking about bringing some of this back to grazing.  We don’t know, however, how long we need to give it after the last dog walks there before we let the livestock on.
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cow, beef cattle, pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

Scarlet.Dragon

  • Joined May 2015
  • Aberdeenshire
Re: Dog Worms
« Reply #3 on: May 13, 2019, 07:39:19 am »
Not sure about for sheep, but with horses there's a recommendation of 3-6 months minimum for the cycle to be broken and worms/larvae to have died off... however it can take longer if there's no 'severe frost'.

As an aside, I've been following the developments with "Bioworma" with interest.  This could be a huge breakthrough if and when it gets licensed in the UK (currently only seems to be available in Australia, New Zealand and USA).  I don't know if it will be used on dogs or just grazers but it's certainly seems to have the potential to help with worm management in livestock as a "different" tool and one that could help with resistant strains.  It's a fungus that is fed to the animals and goes straight through their gut without affecting them, becoming active at the "output" stage and "binding" the larvae so that it doesn't "explode" across the paddocks, thereby reducing the reinfection through ingestion.  From the independent trial data I've seen coming back from "The goat Vet OZ" who has been monitoring the status of clients she has using it, it really seems to be looking effective. 
Excellence is the result of caring more than others think is wise, risking more than others think is safe, dreaming more than others think is practical and expecting more than others think is possible.

Buttermilk

  • Joined Jul 2014
Re: Dog Worms
« Reply #4 on: May 13, 2019, 08:13:37 am »
Not a clue with dog worms but a vet I was talking to about resistant sheep worms said never.  Sheep put on land with resistant worms ungrazed for 20 years picked up resistant worms straight away.  This was in Australia.

shep53

  • Joined Jan 2011
  • Argyll
Re: Dog Worms
« Reply #5 on: May 13, 2019, 11:39:26 am »
Sally what about ploughing and growing some crops either for animal feed eg rape /kale / turnips for a year or two then back to grass ??

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
Re: Dog Worms
« Reply #6 on: May 16, 2019, 03:55:32 pm »
A vet I was talking to about resistant sheep worms said never.  Sheep put on land with resistant worms ungrazed for 20 years picked up resistant worms straight away.  This was in Australia.

The main technique we use for worm control is rotational grazing.  Ponies follow sheep follow cattle.  We certainly need to worm a lot less this way.  I’m assuming that if the equines nullify the sheep worms on the pasture, they’d do that to resistant worms too :thinking:

It’s a shame the above technique seems to work only with the primary host, not the secondary host. Otherwise we could use rotational grazing to clear dog worms from the ground. 
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cow, beef cattle, pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
Re: Dog Worms
« Reply #7 on: May 16, 2019, 03:57:16 pm »
Sally what about ploughing and growing some crops either for animal feed eg rape /kale / turnips for a year or two then back to grass ??

That might have been a good idea if we had the type of land for it.  But our soil is extremely shallow clay, plus we have a few young trees growing dotted about on the patch. 

Thanks for your thoughts, all. 
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cow, beef cattle, pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
Re: Dog Worms
« Reply #8 on: May 16, 2019, 03:58:58 pm »
Not a clue with dog worms but a vet I was talking to about resistant sheep worms said never.  Sheep put on land with resistant worms ungrazed for 20 years picked up resistant worms straight away.  This was in Australia.

Well, something was grazing the land and being a primary host for those worms. Either that or the pasture mites which are the secondary host for these worms live for decades!!
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cow, beef cattle, pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

 

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