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Author Topic: whats the difference in honey  (Read 103 times)

Goatherd

  • Joined Dec 2014
whats the difference in honey
« on: March 09, 2019, 09:09:11 am »
  Morning all      I'm not a bee keeper

     Our son now 29 has for many years had a spoon of  local honey everyday to help against
     his hayfever  Now he really likes oil seed rape honey but it has no help to hayfever problems,
     so he has garden honey What is the difference between set honey and runny clear honey
     We have been told some thing about fructose and glucose   Just interested
« Last Edit: March 09, 2019, 10:10:46 am by Goatherd »
Voss Electric Fence

DavidandCollette

  • Joined Dec 2012
Re: whats the difference in honey
« Reply #1 on: March 09, 2019, 09:41:56 am »
He should be taking honey from the most local source, and have what is seasonally available. The theory is that the honey contains the pollen that causes the hay fever, and the small amounts should help to build resistance. In my book, runny honey is for porridge and set honey for toast, so it doesn't run off and waste  :idea:

Goatherd

  • Joined Dec 2014
Re: whats the difference in honey
« Reply #2 on: March 09, 2019, 10:12:58 am »
In my book, runny honey is for porridge and set honey for toast, so it doesn't run off and waste 

  I like your thinking

macgro7

  • Joined Feb 2016
Re: whats the difference in honey
« Reply #3 on: March 09, 2019, 12:54:11 pm »
Sorry to say but rape seed honey is the cheapest cr*p which even bees dotb want to eat. Unfortunately there is soooo much of it grown and they have lots of cheap honey left.
It sets very quickly - which is a problem because you have to remove from the new give as soon as possible otherwise it will set inside and even bees won't be able to eat it and you won't be able to take it out yourself.
All honey (As long as it hasn't been paterised) will set within a certain period of time. Rape honey sets very quickly. That's the only difference.
My father in law bought a beautiful mountain honey in Turkey but threw it away afte it see. He though it set because it was fake honey made of sugar.
NO! if you pasterise honey (I.e. heat it up to a certain temperature) you will prevent it from setting, at the same time you will kill all potentially harmful bacteria, spores and enzymes. HOWEVER most of them are beneficial to you! Someone mentioned honey acting as a vaccine against hay fever and allergies. This is true but pasterised honey from the supermarket will not benefit you at all as all that is left in it is sugar. It has yo be are honey.
Growing loads of fruits and vegetables! Raising dairy goats, chickens, ducks, geese rabbits and a little boy on 1/2 acre in the middle of the city of Leicester, using permaculture methods.

 

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