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Author Topic: Shepherd's crook  (Read 272 times)

PK

  • Joined Mar 2015
  • West Suffolk
    • Notes from a Suffolk Smallholding
Shepherd's crook
« on: December 05, 2018, 02:45:24 pm »
I was watching Our Yorkshire Farm on TV last night, in which Amanda Owen used a shepherd's crook to catch hold of a lamb in what I thought was a rather nifty action (at least in contrast to my usual stealth, charge and dive method). Are they really useful for this or would I look a bit naff if I had one for this purpose?
Voss Electric Fence

pgkevet

  • Joined Jul 2011
Re: Shepherd's crook
« Reply #1 on: December 05, 2018, 02:57:39 pm »
I'm sure they are useful though I currently use your lunge and dive approach. How naff you may look with one is another matter entirely! - However speculation causes me to suggest you complete the pastiche with a Bo-Peep costume and plaits. Pictures expected!
pgk

shep53

  • Joined Jan 2011
  • Argyll
Re: Shepherd's crook
« Reply #2 on: December 05, 2018, 04:19:12 pm »
As you get older  you use less effort and more skill ( for those that know Cohen the barbarian is a prime example )  so  a crook is vital , just a stretch and pull easy . NZ super crook is the only one to buy , as once it has caught the sheep it ain't going any where .
« Last Edit: December 05, 2018, 04:39:57 pm by shep53 »

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
Re: Shepherd's crook
« Reply #3 on: December 05, 2018, 07:03:16 pm »
I use a leg crook like this one to catch lambs.  The size designed for an adult sheep’s hock is perfect for a lamb’s neck.  You soon get the hang of the techniques for catching and for not letting them escape.

I don’t use it on an adult sheep’s hock, though.  It fits and works, but then they rip your elbow joint in two  :o
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cow, beef cattle, pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

fsmnutter

  • Joined Oct 2012
  • Fettercairn, Aberdeenshire
Re: Shepherd's crook
« Reply #4 on: December 05, 2018, 07:23:56 pm »
Yes, I find a leg crook for adult sheep helpful to catch lambs, or at least slow them down enough to assist the rugby tackle ;) my collie is also good at bringing a lamb down with a paw which really helps with native lambs of a few days old!!!
I can't catch adult sheep with a crook though, I've always felt it really hurts my arms and throws me off balance, likely due to a hyper mobility condition.

cloddopper

  • Joined Jun 2013
  • South Wales .Carmarthenshire. SA18
Re: Shepherd's crook
« Reply #5 on: December 07, 2018, 01:01:08 am »
I was watching Our Yorkshire Farm on TV last night, in which Amanda Owen used a shepherd's crook to catch hold of a lamb in what I thought was a rather nifty action (at least in contrast to my usual stealth, charge and dive method). Are they really useful for this or would I look a bit naff if I had one for this purpose?

 The agri supply companies around Carmarthen seem to sell a lot to the hill farmers who are often seen walking about with one  . Most are made from a strong light dur-aluminium tube for the shaft and a 10 mm rod dur-aluminium rod for the crook which is welded in the end of a ferrule and riveted to the tube
Strong belief , triggers the mind to find the way ... Dyslexia just makes it that bit more amusing & interesting

Fleecewife

  • Joined May 2010
  • South Lanarkshire
    • Wester Gladstone Hebridean Sheep
Re: Shepherd's crook
« Reply #6 on: December 07, 2018, 01:27:04 am »
We had an aluminium crook - it bent terminally the first time we used it.  Now the only time either of us uses a crook is for judging, where you pose leaning on it while you cogitate, then tap your chosen specimen with the crook, for which you need a posh one.


For catching sheep at home, we pack them into a pen then squash the sheep we want against the hurdle, and from there you can gently hold the sheep under the chin - no panic, no resistance.  For catching lambs to castrate - we don't castrate any more!!  But when we used to, it was Mr F's job to do the rugby tackle.  I only ever played lacrosse, and catching a lamb in a basket on a stick might work, but equally it might not.  Anyway, I no longer have my lax stick  :relief:
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Buttermilk

  • Joined Jul 2014
Re: Shepherd's crook
« Reply #7 on: December 07, 2018, 07:18:30 am »
Our aluminium stick also bent in use, then suffered when the quad bike ran over it.  OH still likes it though.  I have a wooden one with a metal crook rivetted on.  Mine is not cold and horrible to handle in winter even if it is heavier than his.  We never walk around the rams without one.

There is a NZ one on the quad but it never gets used unless we have forgotten the others.

chrismahon

  • Joined Dec 2011
  • Gascony, France
Re: Shepherd's crook
« Reply #8 on: December 07, 2018, 07:30:33 am »
We bought a sturdy aluminium long double-ended crook. One end is neck size and the other for the leg- the rubber handle slides along the shaft to use at one end or the other. Pretty useful, but ours became so tame they would come when you called them, so the crook didn't see much use. Wouldn't be much good for an adult- you'd just get pulled over and dragged along behind it.

Foobar

  • Joined Mar 2012
  • South Wales
Re: Shepherd's crook
« Reply #9 on: December 07, 2018, 10:28:34 am »
I use a Colroy neck crook (the shorter size cos I'm short).  Fibreglass so nice and light, and doesn't get cold like aluminium etc.


http://www.ritchey.co.uk/showing-and-handling/default.aspx
Page 26 of the catalogue, the black one on the left


Never used a leg crook, I find it easier to get them by the neck.  Although I have been known to grab a ewe by the back leg when I'm close enough and don't have my crook with me :).  If I did buy a leg crook I'd buy the Blu-roy combination one - you don't have to faff about changing ends then.

Black Sheep

  • Joined Sep 2015
  • Briercliffe
    • Monk Hall Farm
Re: Shepherd's crook
« Reply #10 on: December 08, 2018, 07:33:32 am »
I use a Colroy neck crook. Fibreglass so nice and light, and doesn't get cold like aluminium etc.

Ditto, and is the one she was using on the TV. Incredibly light, flexible too for when you drive the quad too close to the fence and snag it ;)

To be honest it, and a wooden one, are mainly used as arm extensions to help me guide the flock around, rather than catching individuals.

PK

  • Joined Mar 2015
  • West Suffolk
    • Notes from a Suffolk Smallholding
Re: Shepherd's crook
« Reply #11 on: December 08, 2018, 08:59:04 am »
Thanks for all your replies. There are the odd ocassions when you need to catch a single lamb rather than having to round them all up to single one out. Just a thought. The Ritchie catalogue had lots of interesting things in it, by the way, Foobar. Thanks.

 

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