Agri Vehicles Insurance from Greenlands

Recent Posts

1
Cattle / Re: Shetland cow
« Last post by Backinwellies on Today at 02:25:45 pm »
The biggest problem with cows is that you will never have just 2 if you are keeping for milk/meat.

 Cattle take 2 years min to grow to meat (nearer 3 is normal) and to get milk you need a calf a year .... so min you would have is  2 cows, two calves every year (or cows get too fat!,)  plus the growing yearlings  so min 6 and more likely 7/8 ... and that needs  8 acres without any other livestock. 
2
Equipment / Re: Hedgetrimmers - cordless or mains?
« Last post by Backinwellies on Today at 02:20:16 pm »
My dad has a GTec battery one ..... I was amazed at what it cut ..... battery lasted well over an hour  and it is light to use above your head,
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Equipment / Re: Hedgetrimmers - cordless or mains?
« Last post by Anke on Today at 01:19:36 pm »
We are still dithering, but have just bought an electric chainsaw, as we can use that with long extension lead hopefully relatively safely. Too much hassle with the petrol one all the time... But with hedges I am thinking battery is the one to go for...
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Cattle / Re: Shetland cow
« Last post by Anke on Today at 01:03:55 pm »
I too have always wanted Shetland cattle, I did think seriously about it.
But handling facilities, Lot of money tied up in each animal, winter housing / feeding I decided against it.
With goats, we have kids every other year, as the goats milk through the winter, take up less space, easy to take to billy or buy a boer billy and sell on or take for meat. If vet needed just pop goat in van.
I do like shetlands though  :)


Same here... I go drooling over the Jerseys at Great Yorkshire Show every year...
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Equipment / Re: Hedgetrimmers - cordless or mains?
« Last post by Penninehillbilly on Today at 12:41:17 pm »
I have a dewalt battery hedgetrimmer, mainly because we have various other things on same system, so have 4 batteries and charger.
But I do like it, easy to handle, battery has lights to show how much power left, easier to just pick up and whizz round a couple of hedges, no extensions to roll out, no cable to cut through (which of course I once did, with a borrowed machine!)
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Cattle / Re: Shetland cow
« Last post by Penninehillbilly on Today at 12:33:11 pm »
I too have always wanted Shetland cattle, I did think seriously about it.
But handling facilities, Lot of money tied up in each animal, winter housing / feeding I decided against it.
With goats, we have kids every other year, as the goats milk through the winter, take up less space, easy to take to billy or buy a boer billy and sell on or take for meat. If vet needed just pop goat in van.
I do like shetlands though  :)
7
Goats / Re: Castration by Vet
« Last post by suzi on Today at 11:49:30 am »
In 2020 I paid £280 taking my buck to the vets to be castrated.
Be careful. No matter how sweet they are they have had the male hormones a longer time. My buck is super sweet. I still wouldnít trust him with my kids
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Cattle / Re: Shetland cow
« Last post by suzi on Today at 11:08:59 am »
Thank you thatís what I needed to know.

I expect to feed bay all year. I do now.

I do have the goats. They tend to keep the hedges in order rather than take space grazing so I do t generally count them tbh.
The pigs would be gone before the cows arrived (was the plan in my head anyway).

The reason for the route Iím trying to go down is because of my daughters health. Sheís allergic to water. She can tolerate milk rationed (so, 1 week raw cow, another week raw goat then sheep and the 1 I wonít buy is buffaloes milk.

Iím looking for more land to expand the set up (so the animals can be put in winter that are hardy enough too).

Iím having to run before I can walk all the time.

Iím trying to do the best I can by everyone. I am definitely not trying to save money. Zero about what Iím doing is cheaper than buying it in. But, I am sure my daughter wouldnít be with us now if I didnít do what Iím doing
9
Poultry & Waterfowl / Re: Duck breed temperament
« Last post by Womble on Today at 10:57:19 am »
All ducks are panicky. We have some Welsh Harlequins (great ducks BTW), and they'll make a run for it if we get too close, just like the other breeds.
10
Poultry & Waterfowl / Re: Duck breed temperament
« Last post by KirinChris on Today at 10:45:25 am »
@doganjo
She's not interested in ducks or birds per se. In parks and on walks she wouldn't go out of her way to chase a bird, whereas she would sprint half a mile to run down a squirrel or rabbit. As I said, she doesn't hassle our cat, because he largely ignores her.
It's just the sudden movement, and it is particularly hard-wired into her. We've tried to control it for years but I will never completely and reliably eradicate it so I have to plan for that.

@Richmond Well apparently that is another advantage of Harlequins. They can be sexed very early - not 100% but reasonably well. Drakes have a dark bill and ducks are yellow/orange.

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