Smallholders Insurance from Greenlands

Author Topic: Limp piglet  (Read 8058 times)

chickenfeed

  • Guest
Re: Limp piglet
« Reply #15 on: May 24, 2011, 04:10:33 pm »
our hampshires were notched and when someone called to view the pigs they changed their pork order form hampshire to the unregistered saddleback x as they thought the practice was barbaric they were going to contact the bpa with their horror of such a act. i doubt they will hear back from the bpa.

HappyHippy

  • Guest
Re: Limp piglet
« Reply #16 on: May 24, 2011, 06:05:30 pm »
our hampshires were notched and when someone called to view the pigs they changed their pork order form hampshire to the unregistered saddleback x as they thought the practice was barbaric they were going to contact the bpa with their horror of such a act. i doubt they will hear back from the bpa.
I also agree that it's barbaric, especially when there's bound to be another alternative  :-\ It's not done for any kind of welfare or management reasons (in the way castration, teeth clipping, tail docking is) purely for ID  ::) What's wrong with an EID tag like sheep ? A tattoo with UV ink in the ear ? (You get UV inks for tattooing humans  ;))
I wonder, if it's just a coincidence that the Berkshire & Large Black breeds are in decline or if it may be in some way linked to this practice  ??? Given the choice of keeping a pig that you tattoo or one where you cut chunks out of piglets ears .... which would most folk choose ? I say this as someone who has Berkshires, Large Blacks and OSB's and will soom be breeding from them and faced with the question of 'to notch' or 'not to notch' - it's not a prosepct I relish  :'(
Karen  :wave:

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
    • Trelay Cohousing Community
Re: Limp piglet
« Reply #17 on: May 24, 2011, 07:09:06 pm »
Soooo... for the uninitiated, what happens to you and to your pigs if you decide not to notch?
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cows (rearing their own calves for beef), pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

lill

  • Joined May 2011
Re: Limp piglet
« Reply #18 on: May 24, 2011, 07:24:52 pm »
We can't be forced  to notch, but if we want to show them, then the breed rules must be followed. A tag can come out, a tattoo can fade away, but notching pigs correctly, there is no way of any mix up, (as long as you are able to understand what each notch means). I have been onto the breed reps regarding notching and nothing can be done until the BPA come up with a plan to do away with this barbaric practice. :pig: As long as the pigs are not being shown then tagging them is acceptable.

Berkshire Boy

  • Joined May 2011
  • Presteigne, Powys
Re: Limp piglet
« Reply #19 on: May 25, 2011, 09:16:33 am »
I have Berkshires and was not looking forward to notching when I started breeding. Once I had done it the first time and realised that the piglets don't even flinch when you do it I can't see the problem.
You all seem quite happy to force a plastic shaft through their ear can't see the difference myself. ::)
Everyone makes mistakes as the Dalek said climbing off the dustbin.

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
    • Trelay Cohousing Community
Re: Limp piglet
« Reply #20 on: May 25, 2011, 09:43:46 am »
You all seem quite happy to force a plastic shaft through their ear can't see the difference myself. ::)

As a person who forces a lot of plastic shafts through a lot of ears, I have to say that sounds like a good point.

Thanks for the explanation, lillian.  My only other question is, so does each breeder have their own notch?
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cows (rearing their own calves for beef), pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

HappyHippy

  • Guest
Re: Limp piglet
« Reply #21 on: May 26, 2011, 03:50:41 pm »
No, the notching relates to the pig Sally - and as far as I know (could be wrong though and would love to be corrected if I am) you can use any shape of notch you want.
Thing is - even though they're notched, they're tagged too  ::)
It's just that you can't show a pig that's double tagged according to BPA rules  ???
I really think they (The BPA) need to look at it again SOON and either re-write the rules or come up with an alternative.......... I feel a wee campaign coming on (again !)  ;)

Berkshire Boy - when do you notch yours ? My thinking is that under a week in age would be preferable to them being older ? Would welcome your advice  ;)

Karen  :wave:

Berkshire Boy

  • Joined May 2011
  • Presteigne, Powys
Re: Limp piglet
« Reply #22 on: May 26, 2011, 06:36:37 pm »
Hi Karen,
I usually notch by about 3 weeks but you can do it later as long as its before they are weaned or mixed with others. I have one to do thats 5 weeks but its not a problem.
You only cut into the ear 1/8 inch and usually no blood and they don't even flinch. I usually go in the pen and grab a piglet pass it out to my wife who holds it and I notch, over in seconds.
I only notch anything I am going to keep to breed from, sell as breeding or showing I don't bother with the ones going for meat. Its not too bad then as you may be only doing one from a litter.
When you birth notify the litter you are allocated numbers for each of the piglets if I'm only notching one I pick the number with the least amount of notches,it really isn't barbaric once you try it.
Steve
Everyone makes mistakes as the Dalek said climbing off the dustbin.

robert waddell

  • Guest
Re: Limp piglet
« Reply #23 on: May 26, 2011, 07:19:13 pm »
as far as i am aware there are two types of notch V and U                  it is depandant on the breed
now with the numbers i am under the impresion your birth numbers are a rolling counter and the males numbered before the females so how can you just pick a number that has the least amount of notches :farmer:

Tamsaddle

  • Joined May 2011
  • Hampshire, near Portsmouth
Re: Limp piglet
« Reply #24 on: May 26, 2011, 08:59:12 pm »
If you have 6 male piglets you can choose which one gets which of the six sequential numbers - so use the lowest notch numbers for good pigs worth registering, and vice versa.    19 is a horrible number to do on a Saddleback as it has 4 notches, but 20 has one notch.   I'm reluctantly coming round to the idea of marking with notching now - even if I don't want to show our pigs myself, anyone else we sell the pig to might want to do so, then the notching would be essential.   It is a relief to hear from Steve that the piglets don't seem to mind too much.

Hilarysmum

  • Joined Oct 2007
Re: Limp piglet
« Reply #25 on: May 27, 2011, 08:50:53 am »
Our friends imported Large Blacks from UK, whose ears were notched.  On the veterinary inspection they got a rocket from the inspector who felt the whole thing was barbaric, and apparently illegal in France.  Now that must be a first, France accusing UK of barbaric animal practices.

 

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