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Author Topic: New surface for stableyard  (Read 834 times)

Possum

  • Joined Feb 2012
  • Somerset
New surface for stableyard
« on: March 10, 2018, 02:13:04 pm »
When we moved in we inherited two stables and an old concrete stable yard. The concrete is really breaking up now and needs to be replaced. OH wants to use tarmac which will match the adjoining driveway. A friend says concrete is better for stable yards as tarmac can get sticky. Although we have no horses at the moment, there may be some in the future.


What do people think about the best surface to use?
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Scotsdumpy

  • Joined Jul 2012
Re: New surface for stableyard
« Reply #1 on: March 10, 2018, 03:10:18 pm »
I haven't got a definitive answer but if you go with concrete tell the supplier what you are using it for as there is a special additive that helps preserve it from urine etc. I've had a new concrete pad in front of the stables at a property I used to own and tarmac wasn't something I would have considered because we had a heavy shire horse then and I'm sure that his weight wouldhave damaged the surface eespecially in the warmer weather. Maybe others can advise from their experiences.

Buttermilk

  • Joined Jul 2014
Re: New surface for stableyard
« Reply #2 on: March 11, 2018, 07:31:03 am »
There could be a reason most stable yards are concrete and not tarmac.

Horse poo can destroy tarmac, a track near me was resurfaced and allowing horses on it invalidated the warranty so we had to keep off it for a year.  It was a permissive right of way which shut for one day every year to prevent it becoming a proper right of way and one of the most used tracks in the area.

Possum

  • Joined Feb 2012
  • Somerset
Re: New surface for stableyard
« Reply #3 on: March 12, 2018, 08:00:08 pm »
Thank you both for your replies. I am now thinking that the appropriate concrete mix will be best. However, OH points out that the tarmac lane outside our house has horses on it every day and has stood up to the strain for years with no ill effects.


He's quite right. So I now I don't know what to do. ???


Comments??

harmony

  • Joined Feb 2012
Re: New surface for stableyard
« Reply #4 on: March 12, 2018, 08:44:33 pm »
Thank you both for your replies. I am now thinking that the appropriate concrete mix will be best. However, OH points out that the tarmac lane outside our house has horses on it every day and has stood up to the strain for years with no ill effects.


He's quite right. So I now I don't know what to do. ???


Comments??


Depends I guess what you want to do on the surface. If you want to swill out stables for example then concrete is probably better. If you are only use it to get to the stables then it will be like an extension to your drive and tarmac would be OK.


I agree in very hot weather horses will make prints in it so if you want to tie them up on it then it could be a problem but it will depend on how much sun it gets.


Modern tarmac is terribly slippery for horses. And as Buttermilk pointed out not the usual surface for a yard. Over time I suspect good concrete lasts longer than tarmac and there could be a price difference?

Scarlet.Dragon

  • Joined May 2015
  • Aberdeenshire
Re: New surface for stableyard
« Reply #5 on: March 14, 2018, 05:43:51 pm »
If you don't need a solid surface only a hard surface have you considered compacted black dust for the yard? 

You could break down the existing cement yard and then add a few tonnes of black dust (which is essentially a sand like substance made from the chips used in road surfacing/quarry dust and then roll it in with a heavy roller (or even just let it settle over time if there's little or no traffic in the yard normally).  It will allow weeds/grass to grow through it so won't be as "smart" as tarmac, but may blend with tarmac better than white concrete. 

It can't be power washed like concrete, but it does provide a resilient surface for driving and horse traffic. 

I have short tarmac drives to the road with black dust yards and they work really well. 

Both tarmac and concrete can be incredibly slippery in winter, whereas black dust is less so.
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Surface materials for outdoor school

Started by Fi

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Last post May 05, 2011, 09:53:39 am
by AengusOg

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