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Author Topic: Mutton  (Read 2364 times)

pharnorth

  • Joined Nov 2013
  • Cambridgeshire
Mutton
« on: November 17, 2017, 07:06:55 pm »
Just got loads. Seasoned the chops with salt, pepper and rosemary, rendered by placing first at 190C for 15 mins then in the slow oven for an hour good. Very good.  Anyone got some good techniques and recipes for other cuts of mutton?
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waterbuffalofarmer

  • Joined Apr 2014
  • Mid Wales
  • Owner of 61 Mediterranean water buffaloes
Re: Mutton
« Reply #1 on: November 19, 2017, 01:11:40 pm »
I slow cooked our mutton roasts, like pot roasts really, with lots of herbs and spices, in sort of like a morrocan style thing. It was amazing, meat was so tender and flavoursome. Best way to cook it really! :thumbsup:
« Last Edit: November 19, 2017, 06:34:03 pm by waterbuffalofarmer »
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pharnorth

  • Joined Nov 2013
  • Cambridgeshire
Re: Mutton
« Reply #2 on: November 19, 2017, 05:33:12 pm »
Sounds great I'll give it a go.

sabrina

  • Joined Nov 2008
Re: Mutton
« Reply #3 on: November 20, 2017, 03:34:11 pm »
We will have heb mutton soon and I was just wondering the same thing. Best way to cook.

doganjo

  • Joined Aug 2012
  • Clackmannanshire
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Re: Mutton
« Reply #4 on: November 20, 2017, 11:20:53 pm »
Slow cookers work well with mutton
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Anke

  • Joined Dec 2009
  • St Boswells, Scottish Borders
Re: Mutton
« Reply #5 on: November 21, 2017, 08:52:20 pm »

We only eat mutton, and the joints (shoulder and leg) are left bone-in, and then mostly rubbed in some salt and garlic, then top oven temp for between 20 to 30mins, then take out, slosh a bottle of red wine (a whole one) plus another half of water onto joint, cover tightly with tin foil, then return to oven at 160 deg or so and leave for at least three hours. Meat will fall off the bone, and you can make gravy - red currant jelly, reduce and then add some cream.


Any cubed its we generally curry, again, slow cooked. Any mince - meatballs (curried, italian etc), or just the usual bolognese, shepherd's pie etc

Fleecewife

  • Joined May 2010
  • South Lanarkshire
    • Wester Gladstone Hebridean Sheep
Re: Mutton
« Reply #6 on: November 22, 2017, 12:30:01 am »
We like our meat totally blood-free, so slow cooking works excellently.  I use the same basic method for everything that comes in big chunks, including turkey, Heb gigot, pork and so on.  I use a lidded roaster (cast iron is best) or plenty of foil for turkey, place joint in, sprinkle with a little olive oil, massive sprinkle of Herbes de Provence (for sheep), splosh of red wine, enough to cover the bottom of roaster (this keeps the meat moist and tender).  First hour in a hot oven to get things started, another hour or two at an average temp, then I turn the oven off for an hour - cast iron stays warm, but it allows the joint to settle and cook slowly. If I don't need the meat for a while longer then I may leave the oven on very low. I turn it up for the last half hour of cooking time to ensure a crispy skin.  I don't like garlic with sheep meat - it sounds lovely but for me just isn't.  I usually serve with fresh mint sauce, or red currant jelly when cold.  Heb hogget is my favourite meal ever  :yum: :hungry:
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Dans

  • Joined Jun 2012
  • Spalding
    • Six Oaks
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Re: Mutton
« Reply #7 on: December 03, 2017, 08:07:22 pm »
I did some chops tonight in the frying pan following this:

https://www.farmison.com/community/recipe/how-to-cook-mutton-chops

Seasoned with a bit of salt and thyme done medium rare. They were delicious.  :hungry:

Dans
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