NFU Mutual Smallholding Insurance

Author Topic: Getting a small holding  (Read 224 times)

vfr400boy

  • Joined Jan 2013
  • one life live it
Getting a small holding
« on: May 13, 2019, 10:12:25 pm »
So we have been looking for many years to get a small holding or some land but around us it’s to expensive!
We both work and have a half descent wage we have a bit of equity in our home but still we are miles off from owning our own place ( I could earn more but the job I have now let’s me spend time with the kids and animals wich to me is priceless)
So the only 3 ways we think we can get our own land is
Win lotto
Rob a bank
I marry a older woman with a small holding then when she pops her clogs move the wife back in

Any suggestions on how to get on the small holding ladder will be greatly appreciated we don’t want a massive place just somewhere we can grow our own food let kids be kids and maybe a small caravan park or bnb

  Any older single ladies about ha ha
Voss Electric Fence

Mad Goatwoman of Madeley

  • Joined Sep 2011
  • Telford
Re: Getting a small holding
« Reply #1 on: May 13, 2019, 11:19:17 pm »
What about your wife marrying an older man and when he pops his clogs you move in?  :roflanim:


Hope you do get what you want but have you considered an allotment for the time being?

vfr400boy

  • Joined Jan 2013
  • one life live it
Re: Getting a small holding
« Reply #2 on: May 14, 2019, 06:09:13 am »
Ha ha I’d not thort of that !
I all ready have 2 Alotments but they are to many rules on them and we have filled them with veg , and a few hens etc , we’d love a pig and a goat

Scarlet.Dragon

  • Joined May 2015
  • Aberdeenshire
Re: Getting a small holding
« Reply #3 on: May 14, 2019, 06:52:27 am »
It's a position many of us can empathise with.  I spent over a decade trying to find somewhere and constantly losing out to others when I put in bids on places.  One of the big issues in my area was local farmers using a business overdraft to buy the small crofts and then selling off the house for near enough the same price as they'd paid essentially resulting in them acquiring the land for free and another smallholding being swallowed forever.

I did, eventually, get a place by paying way over the odds for it and although some of the neighbours have been problematic it's serving me well for my needs.  On that basis, I'd say never give up trying!

I've heard of people buying old pubs or schoolhouses with a bit of land cheap and converting them, but it takes hard work to do so although it can give a different route into having a bit of ground/large garden.

You might also find that going a bit bigger than you want is cheaper.. I know that sounds stupid but everyone seems to want "about 5 acres" for a couple of ponies and a veg plot... if you look at the 20 acre mark it's less popular because it's too much work for your horse owner and too small to be viable as a farm so you can sometimes get a bargain that way.

There are certainly some older crofters considering succession planning who may be willing to work with you if you can find the right one.  It gives them some help about the place.  Maybe talk to your local mart/land agents and solicitors that specialise in agricultural stuff to see if they are aware of any clients who may consider it... or advertise in the local press under the agri section.  You may also find that there are some older farmers willing to have a "housekeeper and help" that could afford you a cottage in return for work and assistance on the farm.  It may not be "ownership", but it could give you an opportunity to start out that could develop in future.

Finally, if you're base mobile, you may find opportunities in other areas than where you're currently based...but that depends on many factors such as family ties, school etc.

Good luck finding the right place in due course!

As an aside, pigs and goats are social animals and need company of their own kind... so you need at least 3!
Excellence is the result of caring more than others think is wise, risking more than others think is safe, dreaming more than others think is practical and expecting more than others think is possible.

pgkevet

  • Joined Jul 2011
Re: Getting a small holding
« Reply #4 on: May 14, 2019, 07:05:25 am »
You've said it in your post - you want the proverbial cake and eat it (yeah, I'm sounding cruel again, sorry).
This is a classic contemporary thing - surrounded by media and advertising sound-bites about work-life balance and busy lives and modern conveniences etc ect.
My wife and i had completely different upbringings. Her family ducked and dived on modest wages, council housing etc and whenever there was a bit spare they lavishly spent it. Chrstmasses were loads of things to unwrap, everything bought for convenience, making christmas a lavish affair, new bikes for the kids to keep up with the joneses and nothing in the bank.
My folks had entirely different priorities. Dad had a decent job but essentially was frugal. We didn't have a telly until i was in my teens and then only 'cos someone gave one away. Priorities were shelter and food and as much as could be was done or made at home. My first bike was from a local auction site and I had to strup it down, de-rust it, repaint it and repair it before it was rideable. My parents did spent lots of time with us as kids.. but a lot of that time was the family doing stuff together whether that was repainting or dad supervising me with the bike renovation or helping Mum baking. Holidays were camping in europe in army surplus tents and any meal out was a very rare treat.

Don't get me wrong - we had a  great upbringing with parents always there and always ready to help dreams come true..but usually by dint of working for it or making it rather than off-the-shelf. When my dad decided to early retire from his job with a lump sum it was to buy a plot of land to build a house on. He retrained as a teacher and also worked as a freelance translator. For the house build he acted as labourer, carpenter and made all the cupboards, laid all the floors etc in between all the other things he was doing.

That frugal gene stayed with me. When i qualified as a vet and started working I followed that pattern. I didn't suddenly feel well off and bought stuff... far from it I started shoving spare cash into assorted insurance and pension plans and still was careful with any spending - secondhand furniture and essential clothing and care with shopping, cooked for myself despite the long hours I worked back then. Indeed I hardly ever took a holiday and when i did take time from work i usually went off and did a locum job somewhere.

When i did finally manage to raise enough deposit for a house it was a case of strip the whole thing out and fix it up. Even my wedding was a self-catered affair. It was all a  slow progression. When i did finally manage to get my own clinic I still used to do the basic maintenance and tiling  and stuff. I can recall more than one occassion when i was painting or tiling or fixing the conservatory roof  gone midnight because i had to have stuff finished in time to get a few hours kip before morning surgery.

Eventually the business got big enough that i could relax and start to take holidays and hire builders but that was some 20 years post qualifying but even then when the time came to expand the business I abandoned all my hobbies and spends to do that and rolled my sleeves up again and worked the extra hours. My present lifestyle is a result of finally retiring and selling up and moving to a cheaper part of the UK. While I concede that hose prices back then were relatively cheaper we also went through the era of mortgage rates of 15%.

What I'm really getting at is that if you want something badly enough then there's usually a way. Look closely at what you really want and what you fritter money on-  those coffees you buy out, holidays, mobile phone contracts, parties, presents the kids play with once and put away, a second or even thrid job, charity shops, buying an older banger instead of a leasing a car you never own, scrap any sky subscription, shop wisely for food, packed lunches for work. Most folk who really sat down to take stock should find significant savings. You can spend time with the kids without taking them to theme parks and expensive outing. there's heaps of museum, libraries, places of interest, diy projects they can help with and skills they can learn. How much would you have saved over the last 6yrs as a member of this forum if you'ld really been that careful - turning all the lights off at home, thinking twice about full loads in the washer. And are you prepared to do that in exchange for some land? or will you be too old and worn out by the time your dream happens?

vfr400boy

  • Joined Jan 2013
  • one life live it
Re: Getting a small holding
« Reply #5 on: May 14, 2019, 07:13:27 am »
Thanks for all the reply’s ,
The problem around us is that all the pony people buy up all the small affordable land cash ( I will still need a Morgage)
We would consider moving if we can find work and a good school for my kids , my wife is a community Nursey nurse , I am working for the local drainage bored , but have qualifications in pigs and my Hgv , we are very frugal and have managed to buy a very nice detached 3 bed house with a garage etc but it’s not us if that makes sense , I drive a £400 car and have done for 3 years now , we do save each month but still a long way off , I value my time with kids more than money that’s why I left the driving job , it’s catch 22 !
When I am 60 I will probably be able to afford it but be to old to work it ha   

Maysie

  • Joined Jan 2018
  • Herefordshire/Shropshire Border
Re: Getting a small holding
« Reply #6 on: May 14, 2019, 12:14:56 pm »
 There will always be people who are better off than you in the same way that there will be people worse off, but it is your situation that matters and that is the only one which you can influence. 

If you want it badly enough, it will happen - if you make it happen. 

It wont happen though without you (and your family) MAKING it happen, so you need to find the way which works for your situation.  We recently moved a long way away from our family and everyone we know to pursue our dream, it has not been easy.  There has been a lot of stress, it has been very hard work, but in every respect the move has been completely and utterly worth it.  We have had to make painful compromises, but to regurgitate an over used term, 'we only live once'. 

Set your plan and make it happen!   :sunshine:

vfr400boy

  • Joined Jan 2013
  • one life live it
Re: Getting a small holding
« Reply #7 on: May 14, 2019, 06:43:36 pm »
Thanks for that , yes we will keep trying, an other option is we rent our house out and try get on a country estate ( cottage with Big garden) but again they have a lot of rules etc ,


Am disappointed was hoping for loads off offers from older women ha ha
Thanks again for your reply’s

landroverroy

  • Joined Oct 2010
Re: Getting a small holding
« Reply #8 on: May 14, 2019, 10:45:25 pm »
Maysie is right! Set your sights on what you want - really concentrate on it, and it will happen. That's how I built my land up. Just keep looking. Everywhere. I got my first field of my own by spotting a 3 line ad in saturday's Yorkshire Post. A 3 acre field in the obscure village that I live in, that most people have never heard of. The chances of seeing it were remote but because I was focused on what I was looking for, then I saw it. It took over 20 years to find my next bit of land and that was advertised on a site 100 miles away!


In the meantime I rented land from the Environment Agency and Yorkshire Water. Last week I happened to meet the estate manager of a local stately home. Suggested he needed highland cattle grazing to give the right atmosphere to his manicured grounds. He thought it over, and we've been offered about 20 acres to graze!


So what I'm saying is keep your eyes open and you will find what you are looking for.
  Good luck. :thumbsup: [size=78%] [/size]
Rules are made:
  for the guidance of wise men
  and the obedience of fools.

Backinwellies

  • Global Moderator
  • Joined Sep 2012
  • Llandeilo Carmarthenshire
    • Nantygroes
    • Facebook
Re: Getting a small holding
« Reply #9 on: May 16, 2019, 08:30:17 pm »
most smallholders round here   moved away from family  and kept up long commutes to jobs , and are in their 50s .......  follow the dream .... just dont expect it to come to you or happen soon!
Linda

Don't wrestle with pigs, they will love it and you will just get all muddy.

Let go of who you are and become who you are meant to be.

http://nantygroes.blogspot.co.uk/
www.nantygroes.co.uk
Nantygroes  facebook page

craiglang

  • Joined Jul 2018
Re: Getting a small holding
« Reply #10 on: May 16, 2019, 10:57:10 pm »
So we have been looking for many years to get a small holding or some land but around us it’s to expensive!
We both work and have a half descent wage we have a bit of equity in our home but still we are miles off from owning our own place ( I could earn more but the job I have now let’s me spend time with the kids and animals wich to me is priceless)
So the only 3 ways we think we can get our own land is
Win lotto
Rob a bank
I marry a older woman with a small holding then when she pops her clogs move the wife back in

Any suggestions on how to get on the small holding ladder will be greatly appreciated we don’t want a massive place just somewhere we can grow our own food let kids be kids and maybe a small caravan park or bnb

  Any older single ladies about ha ha

So I got a place of 3 acres and cost me nothing in the long run literally less than mile from my home. First I looked for land of 6 acres or more simple reason is that you can always find larger plots than smaller. I knocked on doors and asked local to my own home. It took me all of around 3 months to find piece of agriculture land and then I turned it or converted it to horsiculture. Soon as I did this I applied for six stables and tack room and got the planning passed know problems.

The land had know covenants attached or anything that would stop me from doing what I want with the land, this is because I asked a local and not looking for sale signs. remember that agents are there to tell them that they should put covenants on the land, you do not want these on land you purchase.

So the Six acres was more land than I wanted but I knew lots of people will pay premium for small areas of land so after I had the land for a couple of years I split it in two and sold one half for the same price as I paid for the full parcel of land. The land was also close to electric and water and I kept the piece of land with planning and electric. I also told the buyer that they had to put in the fencing to split the land the road to access and also the water to my land. I would then give them access to my electric free.

I have know turned my land back to agriculture and they have kept theirs for horses. I know that there is shortage of small parcels of land. But you can easy find 6 - 8- 10 acres of land and do not go down the land agents route. You have to be willing to do the leg work.

I know this because I have several friends and we have all done the same, yes it is a bit of work but you will be surprised at what land is actually out there. You may have to pay more for larger parcel of land but you will get it back when you split the land and if you don't get all the full amount you paid. You will certainly get 3 quarters of what you paid back.

It took me a total of 4 years in all to find land, purchase and sell and know, I have a fully functional small farm with electric, water and planning permission. I am also on the edge of where I used to live and so are all my friends so this should be easy to do know matter where you live. I only suggest one thing wait for the right buyer if you want to recoup your initial outlay, as they are going to be your neighbour one day so the choose wisely.

Don't give up keep your eyes open and do not be scared to knock on doors and ask local people who owns what. You will be surprised at the information you can get your hands on and remember shy kids get no sweets....! There are lots of people who own land and have never thought of selling, but if you make them an offer. You are cutting out the agents and go straight through your solicitors, they will do all the checks you need...!
« Last Edit: May 16, 2019, 11:05:22 pm by craiglang »

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
Re: Getting a small holding
« Reply #11 on: May 17, 2019, 01:23:45 am »
There is another way to live on the land, have a great environment and lifestyle for the kids to grow up in, and all that good stuff, and not spend the earth.

It’s not for everyone, but if you are happy to work with other people to fulfil your dreams and theirs, CoHousing is a growing trend.  Many don’t have livestock, but some do, including ours.

Have a look on the UK CoHousing website.  And on ours, we are seeking new members right now :)
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cow, beef cattle, pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

 

Small holding and my daughter

Started by simba

Replies: 24
Views: 5682
Last post May 15, 2012, 07:38:34 pm
by simba
Small holding skills

Started by AD83

Replies: 0
Views: 88
Last post March 14, 2019, 05:49:45 am
by AD83
Possible small holding for sale - Fife

Started by Croftgary

Replies: 2
Views: 2553
Last post May 21, 2012, 04:28:57 pm
by bigchicken
Small holding visit for my grandchildren (and me)

Started by happygolucky

Replies: 41
Views: 6772
Last post April 21, 2013, 10:56:29 pm
by happygolucky
Any advice, small holding or farm?

Started by Borderlands

Replies: 20
Views: 4174
Last post May 28, 2015, 11:44:21 pm
by doganjo

Forum sponsors

FibreHut Energy Helpline Thomson & Morgan Time for Paws Scottish Smallholder & Grower Festival Little Peckers

© The Accidental Smallholder Ltd 2003-2019. All rights reserved.

Design by Furness Internet

Site developed by Champion IS