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Author Topic: Trees by the coast  (Read 13704 times)

Alan

  • Joined Oct 2007
Trees by the coast
« on: October 21, 2007, 12:41:35 pm »
Hi there I am looking to plant a small group of trees as part of landscaling our new house.  It is situated 7o metres back from the north coast of scotland about 20 metres above sea level.  Just about to start looking but I suspect that recommendations will give more comfort than advertised claims.  my concerns should be obvious but: sea/ salt spray, wind and relative cold weather.  anyone had success?

Alan
Voss Electric Fence

Fluffywelshsheep

  • Joined Oct 2007
  • Near Stirling, Central Scotland
Re: Trees by the coast
« Reply #1 on: October 21, 2007, 02:15:55 pm »

first i think you need to think about
Wind
a physical barrier as they start from being young. Eg a fence with holes in it. To help distribute the wind effect.
salt spray
 I believe things like holly which has gloss shine leaves have the ability to survive from salt spray. (i might be wrong with this). I also think i remember, leaves which are silver in colour like can survive in salt spray conditions.

had a search on the internet and found that if you can get hold of it Whitebeam ( Sorbus intermedia) http://www.scotland.gov.uk/Publications/2002/06/14891/5585

hope this helps
Linz






Alan

  • Joined Oct 2007
Re: Trees by the coast
« Reply #2 on: October 21, 2007, 03:49:40 pm »
thanks Linz

you are right wind will be the easiest to solve, whitebeam looks interesting, and what a cool link. thanks, I'll let you know what I find.  you can see the view on www.firthviewharvest.co.uk.

Alan

Fluffywelshsheep

  • Joined Oct 2007
  • Near Stirling, Central Scotland
Re: Trees by the coast
« Reply #3 on: October 21, 2007, 04:07:35 pm »
i'll hunt out my tree book a bit later today and i'll see what i can find, in a former life (while in college) I studies forestry and countryside management.
Oh and btw am sulking cos it looks like such a lovely view. Maybe i should post my view lol
End of terrace council house lol


Linz

Rosemary

  • Joined Oct 2007
  • Barry, Angus, Scotland
    • The Accidental Smallholder
Re: Trees by the coast
« Reply #4 on: October 21, 2007, 04:11:08 pm »
Hey, Linz. Lots of lovely views in Clackmannanshire - you might need to crane your neck a little but the Ochils are right there!

Fluffywelshsheep

  • Joined Oct 2007
  • Near Stirling, Central Scotland
Re: Trees by the coast
« Reply #5 on: October 21, 2007, 04:15:32 pm »
lol if i stand in the middle of the main street road i get a view of the Wallace monument lol
Love the Ochils can almost see them apart from base from the corner of the living room window.


 ??? mmm that give me an idea to take some photos to put on my blog.
Linz


Fluffywelshsheep

  • Joined Oct 2007
  • Near Stirling, Central Scotland
Re: Trees by the coast
« Reply #6 on: October 24, 2007, 09:31:29 pm »
sorry i haven't been able to get any more info for you been very busy and had news that my grandmother has died monday so will be visiting my parents etc for the funeral. I might possible raid their tree books to see if it will help at all.

jan

  • Joined Oct 2007
Re: Trees by the coast
« Reply #7 on: October 25, 2007, 10:47:37 am »
Cant help on this one Im afraid Alan but just to let you know we are very jealous of you beautiful place, might visit next summer, do you allow dogs?

Fluffywelshsheep

  • Joined Oct 2007
  • Near Stirling, Central Scotland
Re: Trees by the coast
« Reply #8 on: October 25, 2007, 10:58:02 am »
Had a look in a book and it says about sea buckthorn ~native to europe mainly coastal regions of the north west
from larousse pocket guide trees of britain and europe.isbn 0-7523-0017-2

linz

Rosemary

  • Joined Oct 2007
  • Barry, Angus, Scotland
    • The Accidental Smallholder
Re: Trees by the coast
« Reply #9 on: October 25, 2007, 07:14:04 pm »
Have a look on the Hopes Grove Nursery website - you can select trees and shrubs specifically suited to coastal areas. We've had trees and hedging from them before and they've been realy good quality.

Fluffywelshsheep

  • Joined Oct 2007
  • Near Stirling, Central Scotland
Re: Trees by the coast
« Reply #10 on: November 04, 2007, 12:52:24 pm »
okay forgot to say that i have been in both stores of lidls in South Wales and scotland and they both has variated of Hornbeam in them i believe it to be the right one that is need (not sure how close you are to a lidls), they are about 2 years old so are quite grown, if you where to get some then i would surjest getting some and to a trail with staking them and some not to see which fairs better, I would also recommend keeping them in pots untill the warmer months as i am not sure where they original came from so they can get aclimb to the environment.
hope this helps
Linz


Loqueris

  • Joined May 2008
  • Caithness, Highlands of Scotland.
Re: Trees by the coast
« Reply #11 on: December 18, 2008, 12:40:47 pm »
Hi there I am looking to plant a small group of trees as part of landscaling our new house.  It is situated 7o metres back from the north coast of scotland about 20 metres above sea level.  Just about to start looking but I suspect that recommendations will give more comfort than advertised claims.  my concerns should be obvious but: sea/ salt spray, wind and relative cold weather.  anyone had success?

Alan

I know this is kinda late but I also live on the North Coast of Scotland (Lybster, Caithness) and am very close to the sea and am very exposed so I know what kind of trees/plants have managed to survive here.
Willow is fantastic and it is soooooo easy to propagate. I literally pull off teeny branches in winter when they're bare (with a heel if poss but not totally necessary), shove em in a jar of water over winter and when spring comes they'll root and ready to pot on. Plus they grow very quickly.
They will always be my first choice and I even have a weeping willow growing - albeit a baby.
Acers have done well here, Beech does well too, obviously most of the Firs do extremely well. Then there's Ash (have loads of that), Birch, Alder and we even have 3 Oak trees growing well and are about 20ft high.

The most important thing is the staking. We get severe winds here and if you don't stake properly the trees will show it as they'll be bent right over.

Good Luck

p.s Get in touch with your local Forestry commission as they often know of someone who sells these trees at very low prices. There's a guy at Dornoch way who sells saplings at least a couple of foot high for £1 a go. I'm not sure of his name though but it can be found through the Dornoch Forestry Commission if it's of any use to you.
Happiness belongs to the self sufficient!

sabrina

  • Joined Nov 2008
Re: Trees by the coast
« Reply #12 on: January 24, 2009, 06:42:00 pm »
We have planted over 100 Willow and they do grow very fast, I found it best to keep cutting the top to make them bush out more, we also have Ash and Rowan both grow well but we are a couple of miles from the sea. Get very strong winds every winter and lots of rain

northfifeduckling

  • Joined Jan 2009
  • Fife
    • North Fife Blog
Re: Trees by the coast
« Reply #13 on: January 25, 2009, 11:24:13 pm »
I thought of the same as Linz, Sea Buckthorn, although they don't grow very tall.  It's more of a large shrub, but with lovely small silvery leaves and once established, lots of little orange fruit in the autumn you can turn into the healthiest jam ever! I've planted some 2 winters ago - now would be the best time for bare root plants. We have not had any fruit yet, still waiting...

 

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