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Author Topic: duck and geese pond  (Read 3880 times)

kipper

  • Joined May 2013
duck and geese pond
« on: October 03, 2014, 10:47:51 am »
Was wondering if i was wasting my time making a pond with a liner for geese and ducks without a filter ? will it just go smelly with there waste or is there an alternative ?they seem happy in a sand pit just now and easy to clean every week but have the space for a pond,thanks for any help

Clansman

  • Joined Jul 2013
  • Ayrshire
Re: duck and geese pond
« Reply #1 on: October 03, 2014, 11:14:24 am »
ours has no filter, it goes green and smelly in the warmer months, ok in the colder months, they still love using it though whatever its like.

Its only a 8 foot moulded job and we do empty it now and again and refill

clydesdaleclopper

  • Joined Aug 2009
  • Aberdeenshire
Re: duck and geese pond
« Reply #2 on: October 03, 2014, 11:18:17 am »
Have you thought about making one without a liner using clay to seal it then you can put oxygenation plants in it and plant around it.
Our holding has Anglo Nubian and British Toggenburg goats, Gotland sheep, Franconian Geese, Blue Swedish ducks, a whole load of mongrel hens and two semi-feral children.

kipper

  • Joined May 2013
Re: duck and geese pond
« Reply #3 on: October 03, 2014, 11:25:14 am »
thanks would plants make it cleaner or just healthier for them ? I could use a liner and put a ledge with plants .What would be an ideal size and depth for them ?  :thumbsup:

Fleecewife

  • Joined May 2010
  • South Lanarkshire
    • ScotHebs
Re: duck and geese pond
« Reply #4 on: October 03, 2014, 11:41:58 am »

We lined our duck pond with concrete, which of course makes it a bit permanent, but that works for us.  It can get green and smelly so we run an overflow pipe from one of the water butts, which washes it through - the 'beach' is lower than the sides, so the manky water runs out that way.  Obviously that doesn't work in a drought, so we sometimes scoop all the water out with buckets in summer and use it to speed up the compost heap, or directly around fruit trees and bushes - great stuff.   Ducks will tend to pull up any plants in the pond itself, but you can plant lots around the edge.

In fact we don't have ducks any more, so the pond is reverting to nature a bit, in spite of the concrete lining - a bit of silt has settled on the bottom and it now has yellow flag and water mint in.  The hens use it for drinking, and the frogs and toads breed in it.

For depth, I would suggest it needs to be deep enough for the ducks and geese to reach the bottom when they upend themselves.
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kipper

  • Joined May 2013
Re: duck and geese pond
« Reply #5 on: October 03, 2014, 11:50:37 am »
Brilliant thanks

Clansman

  • Joined Jul 2013
  • Ayrshire
Re: duck and geese pond
« Reply #6 on: October 03, 2014, 12:11:18 pm »
The plant thing might work with a larger pond but with a small one and a few geese and ducks they just destroy it!  ;D

madchickenlady

  • Joined Nov 2013
  • Old Newton Suffolk
Re: duck and geese pond
« Reply #7 on: October 03, 2014, 06:01:17 pm »
I invested in a small electric pump which gets most of the water out and then I use an aqua vac which I picked up cheap on ebay. The pump has a hose attached to it and I use the water on my fruit trees. My ducks only use this pond in the mornings the rest of the time they use a natural pond that I am lucky enough to have.
Heather

 

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