Smallholders Insurance from Greenlands

Author Topic: Ewes / tups in adjoining fields ?  (Read 2645 times)

marka

  • Joined Dec 2012
  • Moray, NE Scotland
  • www.facebook.com/WellsideCroft
    • Facebook
Ewes / tups in adjoining fields ?
« on: July 09, 2014, 09:20:15 am »
Hi there,

Just wondering what everyone thought about putting ewes in an adjacent field to tups at this time of year ? Would we be running the risk of the tup jumping the fence to get to them or should it be ok ?
Its just a single line of fence with stock fencing and a wire top line between the two

Many thanks

Mark
Castlemilk Moorit sheep and Belted Galloway cattle, plus other hangers on.

Hellybee

  • Joined Feb 2010
    • www.blaengwawrponies.co.uk
Re: Ewes / tups in adjoining fields ?
« Reply #1 on: July 09, 2014, 09:27:30 am »
I suppose it could depend on how agile they are.  Our rams are very docile and big hefty lads I don't think theyed climb into any field.  But as for the ewes, some of them would try n climb in  :innocent:




Marches Farmer

  • Joined Dec 2012
  • Herefordshire
Re: Ewes / tups in adjoining fields ?
« Reply #2 on: July 09, 2014, 09:29:44 am »
Depends on the breed.  Some ewes will accept the tup all year.  Most don't.  It's not always the tups that visit the ewes - last year we had a ewe jump two fences to get to the tup.  As the days lengthen the ewes will start to cycle and the tups rev up.  Depends how averse you are to lambs in December. 

Bionic

  • Joined Dec 2010
  • Talley, Carmarthenshire
Re: Ewes / tups in adjoining fields ?
« Reply #3 on: July 09, 2014, 09:30:43 am »
Mark,
I am no expert but think about the type of sheep you have and how good your fencing is. I have Ryelands and they just don't seem to do fence jumping. My tup is in the field next to my girls with four bar fencing in between. They often sit either side of the fence but there is never any attempt to jump over.
On the other hand I have seen the commercial sheep round here jumping fences as if they are training for the olympics, clearing it easily.
Life is like a bowl of cherries, mostly yummy but some dodgy bits

Marches Farmer

  • Joined Dec 2012
  • Herefordshire
Re: Ewes / tups in adjoining fields ?
« Reply #4 on: July 09, 2014, 09:33:54 am »
Our neighbour's Badger Face ram cleared a five foot sheeted cattle gate and two field gates to visit another neighbour's ewes.

marka

  • Joined Dec 2012
  • Moray, NE Scotland
  • www.facebook.com/WellsideCroft
    • Facebook
Re: Ewes / tups in adjoining fields ?
« Reply #5 on: July 09, 2014, 09:36:29 am »
Hi all,

Many thanks for the replies so far.

We have Castlemilk moorits ewes and 2 old ryeland lawnmowers and our tup is a CM as well.

They haven't shown any signs so far of wanting to jump the fences so far but there's always a first time I suppose.

Regards

Mark
Castlemilk Moorit sheep and Belted Galloway cattle, plus other hangers on.

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
    • Trelay Cohousing Community
Re: Ewes / tups in adjoining fields ?
« Reply #6 on: July 09, 2014, 09:45:08 am »
I really hesitate to say this, because it's the sort of thing that will come and bite you in the bottom - but so far, my CM ewes and wethers haven't ever been amongst the jumper-outers in my flock.  Most but not all of the Shetlands and Shetland Xs do.  One of the Manxes does, and her daughter too, the other Manx doesn't but her Shetland X daughter deos.  But so far, none of the CMs.

But then, I haven't had a CM tup and that sort of provocation! ;)  :D
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cows (rearing their own calves for beef), pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

 

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