Smallholders Insurance from Greenlands

Author Topic: Foraging on a large scale  (Read 10431 times)

JulieWall

  • Joined Aug 2013
  • Cornhill, Banff
    • The Roundhouse
Re: Foraging on a large scale
« Reply #15 on: October 04, 2013, 12:10:56 pm »
Slight backtrack, just wanted to say that Discovery are my all-time fave apple. The flesh is tinted pink and the fragrance is awesome. They cook down well too and don't need much sweetening when cooked, so make a good dual purpose apple. Downside is that they have a very short season so plant yourself some trees Bodger, you won't regret it :D
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Bodger

  • Joined Jul 2009
Re: Foraging on a large scale
« Reply #16 on: October 04, 2013, 02:30:44 pm »
we got 13 or 14 trugs of discovery and they were extremely juicy and as you say, they have a fantastic colour. We found them a little too sweet for our liking, so we did them with some apples that had a sharper taste.

ellied

  • Joined Sep 2010
  • Fife
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Re: Foraging on a large scale
« Reply #17 on: October 04, 2013, 06:26:40 pm »
Apparently my 2 old Bramleys have produced more than most of the rest of the orchard group put together this year, they're definitely overdoing themselves this year and there isn't the market for them so I'm only getting 2-3 boxes a week taken to market.  Lots of windfalls and loads still on the tree, may take what's left after the last orchard market and juice it, but the ones on the ground look such a waste if they're no good for juicing.

Would they be ok if juiced and drunk fresh on the day they fell so nothing new formed? 

I've only 1 eating apple tree and it's linked branches with one of the Bramleys so I need a further prune this year.  I've bought in Discovery, Scrumptious, Cox and hmm, can't remember now what the 4th is!  And looking at a few more cane fruit too.  So much of my garden is ornamental and/or chicken sunbathing/dustbathing territory that I'm planning to expand the orchard along the back of the house across 2 "flower" beds in the next year or so if I stay put.  Seems a waste to be weeding and pruning and egg hunting in fuchsias and potentillas if I could be picking berries!
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Bodger

  • Joined Jul 2009
Re: Foraging on a large scale
« Reply #18 on: October 07, 2013, 06:06:19 pm »
Not for sale on a shelf near you but this time next year Rodney, we could both be millionaires.  :excited: What do you think, do they look OK? Here's our bottled cider and apple juice. We bottled the cider this afternoon and I'll be doing some quality control work this evening.
 


 


Donald

  • Joined Dec 2009
Re: Foraging on a large scale
« Reply #19 on: October 08, 2013, 06:16:46 pm »
I don't know anything about Pailin or anything you can get from juicing fallen apples but I know this juice is not that nice so it was good to get some validation from these postings and I will from now on save fallen apples for the cider latter on and probably get at the one tree that seems to loose its fruit spontaneously earlier on for juice.


Greetings,


Don

Bodger

  • Joined Jul 2009
Re: Foraging on a large scale
« Reply #20 on: October 12, 2013, 06:18:38 am »
I've managed to collect another ten trugs  this last week and we'll be pressing again today.

Bodger

  • Joined Jul 2009
Re: Foraging on a large scale
« Reply #21 on: November 06, 2013, 10:05:30 am »
We did our last apple juice on Monday and a tally up reveals that we've made 1345 x 75cl bottles of apple juice this season. We're looking forward to having a relaxing weekend.

Spinningfishwife

  • Joined Oct 2013
Re: Foraging on a large scale
« Reply #22 on: November 06, 2013, 11:22:41 am »
These trugs of apples look gorgeous! And 1345 bottles, eek! I presume you sell it? It's a lot of juice for a single family.

I've got a very modest group of three apple trees, no idea what they are but there's one big golden yellow type, one russet type and a cox type. The yellow ones are the earliest and nicest to eat so naturally it's the least productive tree, I only got twenty apples off it this year and that's more than normal. The other two produced a couple of hundred good apples between them, they make good juice. My more modest juicing system is to use the juicer attachment on my old Kenwood Chef and freeze it, it's enough for the family. The windfalls go to a neighbour's goats.

Interesting about the Pailin, I didn't know about it at all. I have been known just to trim the better windfalls to use in juice and cooking so I'd better not in the future, I suppose?

Bodger

  • Joined Jul 2009
Re: Foraging on a large scale
« Reply #23 on: November 06, 2013, 01:48:25 pm »
They say that Patulin above a certain level isn't good for you but I don't think that they actually know what harm it does. I've picked up and munched countless windfalls this year and I'm still managing to hang on. :fc:
« Last Edit: November 06, 2013, 02:11:16 pm by Bodger »

 

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