NFU Mutual Smallholding Insurance

Author Topic: Buddlea?  (Read 1864 times)

Susannah

  • Joined Sep 2012
  • Pencaitland
Buddlea?
« on: May 27, 2013, 08:12:58 am »
About to hack back a buddlea and was going to give it to the goats then googled to see if I should. One site sais it contains strychnine but other sites say it is safe. Anyone have any experience or advice. Am tempted to think if in doubt...don't, but would be a shame to waste it if I could! Thanks.
Jacob sheep, Shetland cows, Pygmy goats, Chinese geese, Khaki Campbell ducks.
Voss Electric Fence

jaykay

  • Joined Aug 2012
  • Cumbria/N Yorks border
Re: Buddlea?
« Reply #1 on: May 27, 2013, 08:29:53 am »
Haven't ever fed it.

This list suggests it's 'slightly poisonous' - I think the list is suggesting if humans ate it.

To be honest, if they were mine, I wouldn't risk it.

Susannah

  • Joined Sep 2012
  • Pencaitland
Re: Buddlea?
« Reply #2 on: May 27, 2013, 08:53:41 am »
Thank you for your reply. No, I am not going to risk it. Good list though, thanks for the link.
Jacob sheep, Shetland cows, Pygmy goats, Chinese geese, Khaki Campbell ducks.

Mad Goatwoman of Madeley

  • Joined Sep 2011
  • Telford
Re: Buddlea?
« Reply #3 on: May 27, 2013, 10:14:19 pm »
One of mine has eaten it with no ill results - not a lot though. She wasn't that keen. I have fed them branches and they love the bark and twigs.

sokel

  • Global Moderator
  • Joined Jun 2012
  • S W northumberland
Re: Buddlea?
« Reply #4 on: May 28, 2013, 07:49:44 am »
We have a big Buddleia Ours have grabbed a few mouth fulls in passing but we try to stop them
everything I have found on google says its safe for goats to eat but I really dont know
Graham

Penninehillbilly

  • Joined Sep 2011
  • West Yorks
Re: Buddlea?
« Reply #5 on: June 02, 2013, 01:43:02 am »
A local goatkeeper advised me not to feed it.
 
So what browsings DO others feed their goats?
 
I cut some red stemmed cornus back, when the girls found a clump down the field (where they weren't supposed to be) they stripped it, then acted very doubtful at some I cut and carried to them  ::)
They also make a grab at Rhubarb leaves, I think mainly because they know I try to stop them, been known to catch one and pull leaves out of her mouth.
Wild raspberry they don't like, brambles they love.
On a list it says Holly is bad, (trauma due to prickles I think) so I try not to let mine get at it on the way to the field, they are sometimes too quick for me.
herd leader grabs at bamboo, as does one male kid, maybe others haven't noticed it yet?
She also makes a break for pink campion.
Reading back over this maybe it's time I fenced a route to the field !
 
Does anyone know if burdock is safe? got lots to get rid of. Did think about dandelion and burdock but couldn't find a recipe  :(

Mad Goatwoman of Madeley

  • Joined Sep 2011
  • Telford
Re: Buddlea?
« Reply #6 on: June 02, 2013, 10:22:27 pm »
I use to have access to lime trees and that was very popular. Beech, chestnut - both horse and sweet, oak but just a little, hazel, lilac. I used to feed hawthorn until Cloud had a huge absess on one cheek when she was just a few months old and the vet said it was probably due to eating hawthorn and getting a thorn embedded. Apparently hawthorn has a fungus growing on it which is waht caused the infection. The vet knew this from having had a thorn stuck in him (don't think he was eating it though  :roflanim: ).

Mine like tomato plants but I don't encourage this for obvious reasons. They also enjoy the odd rose that has started dying off in the vase.   

ballingall

  • Moderator
  • Joined Sep 2008
  • Avonbridge, Falkirk
Re: Buddlea?
« Reply #7 on: June 02, 2013, 10:57:12 pm »
Sorry pennine hillbilly, I can't help with all of these. Rhubarb is poisonous, so you are right to grab it out of their mouths. Raspberry, bramble, in fact all fruit bushes are fine to feed. Holly is ok actually, not poisonous, but of course not all goats are brave enough to try the prickles.


We feed ours flowering currant- don't know it's proper name. It's one of the first things out in spring, and for a sick goat just after kidding its nice.


Feed the usual things, elm, elder (not the berries generally), comfrey, sycamore (before July), chestnut, ash, birch, willow, nettles, sticky willie!


Beth

 

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