Smallholders Insurance from Greenlands

Author Topic: Cockerels  (Read 9039 times)

lokismum

  • Joined Mar 2013
  • kent
Cockerels
« on: April 04, 2013, 01:22:32 pm »
just looking at having some breeding hens as well as my layers
obviously I'm going to end up with cockerels
was thinking of sending them to the table  :innocent:
would anyone like to share how you umm :innocent: dispatch yours
we will get there
ONE DAY !!!!

mentalmilly

  • Joined Nov 2012
Re: Cockerels
« Reply #1 on: April 04, 2013, 01:51:17 pm »
We had this problem, necking was a bit harsh especially if not done right the first time, but we now shoot them with our air rifle in the back of the head, and hang them over a bucket to bleed.  This is the best way for us as its humane,  instant and the birds don't know what is happening and we don't get this wrong, especially if they are strong birds.  We have the two of us to do this, one to shoot and the other to hold them down until they stop twitching.  Now l bet you don't have an air rifle???

lokismum

  • Joined Mar 2013
  • kent
Re: Cockerels
« Reply #2 on: April 04, 2013, 01:59:54 pm »
not as  yet but it could be my next investment :thinking:
I'm not sure if its worth the time and hassle to do it
could i sell some of them at the gate
we will get there
ONE DAY !!!!

chrismahon

  • Joined Dec 2011
  • Gascony, France
Re: Cockerels
« Reply #3 on: April 04, 2013, 08:35:44 pm »
We now use the Gale Dumelow (Raising Chickens) method of shooting in the head. Wrap the bird in a towel and use an air pistol at the 8 ft lbs limit to shoot it above the eyes. Immediately hold the head in a kitchen towel to direct the blood  into the tray you have the bird sitting in. Too many people tell us that neck dislocation or neck crushing or head cutting off results in the brain living for some considerable time afterwards. In the days of 'la guillotine' in France it was often reported that the head landed in the basket and the eyes blinked for some time afterwards -'where am I'? Mentalmilly has the right approach in our experience, but an air rifle could be a bit too powerful (so very messy) for chickens.

JMB

  • Joined Apr 2011
Re: Cockerels
« Reply #4 on: April 04, 2013, 08:42:54 pm »
I tried everything to rehome our cockerels. Even the Battery Hen rehoming place didn't want them.
We got an experienced farmer friend to take them off their perch at bedtime and wring their necks.
I couldn't have done it myself .
The close shooting idea sounds a better idea.
J xxxx

HesterF

  • Joined Jul 2012
  • Kent
  • HesterF
Re: Cockerels
« Reply #5 on: April 05, 2013, 01:18:01 am »
Not done it myself but I've an ex-vet friend who is going to show me how to dispatch via the broomstick method. Apparently you hold them upside down so that they go into a sort of trance, then you can lay them down, put the pole/broomstick over their neck, hold it firmly down while pulling up on their feet in one brisk move. She's a petite lady but reckons she can dispatch any poultry this way (including geese). Personally I think I'm going to struggle with the whole concept of doing it myself - even with my current cockerel who is full of attitude and most definitely not breeding material being neither a pure colour nor a pure breed (altogether an accident, thanks to an 'expert' breeder).

H

harefarm

  • Joined Jan 2013
  • Winchester
Re: Cockerels
« Reply #6 on: April 05, 2013, 09:25:10 am »
I went on a course to learn the broomstick on the back of the neck method. It is difficult to start with but it does get easier, although still tugs at the heartstrings.

The lady that does it is Defra registered for culling birds. Maybe too far away for most but still worth thinking about.

http://www.hookfarm.net/courses/kill-pluck-gut-and-bone.php

lokismum

  • Joined Mar 2013
  • kent
Re: Cockerels
« Reply #7 on: April 05, 2013, 09:33:40 am »
mmm I'm not sure i can do it myself to soft
that's why i asked to see if i could find a quick way to do it
because one way or another they will have to go
we will get there
ONE DAY !!!!

harefarm

  • Joined Jan 2013
  • Winchester
Re: Cockerels
« Reply #8 on: April 05, 2013, 01:10:50 pm »
I know what you mean lokismum. I felt the same but if anything happened where a chicken was really ill or  attacked badly but still alive especially at the weekend when the vets are difficult to get hold of, I found it a bit of a comfort to know that they don't have to suffer any longer, that I could put an end to the pain. I love my birds and couldn't just sit there and watch them suffer, knowing that if I knew what I was doing I could stop the pain. That was my original reason but then tasted the difference between one that I prepared on the course and one I bought from the shops. It is so much nicer and fresher. I won't go into more detail, but that is basically the long and the short of it FOR ME.

It is such a personal thing. Some people can, others can't.

Marches Farmer

  • Joined Dec 2012
  • Herefordshire
Re: Cockerels
« Reply #9 on: April 05, 2013, 03:18:53 pm »
I bought a humane dispatcher from Ascott some years ago - it's a bit like a pair of pliers with a notch in the blades.  You simply hold the bird securely, get the pliers in position around the neck, then swiftly squeeze and tilt the neck towards the back.  Very quick and no mess.

fl206

  • Joined Feb 2013
Re: Cockerels
« Reply #10 on: April 05, 2013, 08:14:08 pm »
... use an air pistol at the 8 ft lbs limit

Just like to point out (in the UK at least), the limit for an air pistol is 6 ft lbf, not 8. 12ft lbf for an air rifle if it's not listed on a FAC.

lokismum

  • Joined Mar 2013
  • kent
Re: Cockerels
« Reply #11 on: April 06, 2013, 01:17:31 am »
humane dispatcher :hug:
that'll be it then I'm off to find one yay :excited:
couldn't live with my self if i messed up
i can live with having to do something for the good of the flock
causing pain and disstress i cant :gloomy:
we will get there
ONE DAY !!!!

Mammyshaz

  • Joined Feb 2012
  • Durham
Re: Cockerels
« Reply #12 on: April 06, 2013, 01:44:22 am »
If you look on the Humane Slaughter web page it lists ways of slaughter. The dispatcher is not seen as humane as it can cause suffering.
The stunning method is the most humane reported method but there are pros and cons. ( and I think you need a license but don't quote on that ).

I've been reading information and watching clips of dispatch for almost a year, trying to decide the best method as we wish to hatch our own hens.
We have decided that a pistol is quick and certain, followed by neck bleeding.  OH has joined a gun club and is getting confidence practicing on rats at present ( the cockerels will be done at point blank  ).

It really is a personal thing. Try to base your decision on how confident you are in doing it quickly and confidently. Always have a plan two in case plan one doesn't go to plan ( glad I learned this one from reading other's experiences ).

I have no experience in dispatch but am at the same point as yourself so hope this is of some help   :sunshine:  :chook:


suziequeue

  • Joined Feb 2010
  • Llanidloes; Powys
Re: Cockerels
« Reply #13 on: April 06, 2013, 06:21:31 am »
We have an air rifle which we use to pop off the occasional squirrel but I am assuming that this would  not be appropriate to despatch chickens with.


An air pistol is about 150.


Do other people have a special air pistol for despatching or will the rifle do???
We do the best we can with the information we have

When we know better we do better

Mammyshaz

  • Joined Feb 2012
  • Durham
Re: Cockerels
« Reply #14 on: April 06, 2013, 08:10:31 am »
An air pistol is about 150.

We paid less than half that for ours  ;) it is not powerful but good enough to take out the odd rat  ;D

 

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