Agri Vehicles Insurance from Greenlands

Author Topic: You learn something new everyday!  (Read 2967 times)

Mallows Flock

  • Joined Apr 2012
  • Shepton mallet
    • Somerset Pet Sitting and Dog Walking
You learn something new everyday!
« on: July 16, 2012, 07:52:14 pm »
Today, my cracking vet rang me for a lengthy discussion re: worming!
The long and the short of it is (stuff i didn't know)
Tapeworms have no detrimental impact on sheep.... don't deworm for it! Expensive and unnecessary!
Ewes are more or less immune to worms/worm damage apart from fluke which they don't build an immunity to. Worm with a flukicide (NOT wormer with anti fluke... just a fluke treatment) at the end of a wet summer and beginning of Spring for year round protection.
Ewes after paturition or ewes that have multiple births could do with a worming dose after birthing as they have lower resistance so could do with dosing!
Lambs have little resistance in their first year but preventative worming is unnecessary and again, expensive. Take in regular fecal samples for free/low cost analysis.
I am sure many of you know this, but for me the world of worming has been rather a minefield so i hope it makes life easier for some others of us that are a little confused by the whole worming debate!
From 3 to 30 and still flocking up!

Bionic

  • Joined Dec 2010
  • Talley, Carmarthenshire
Re: You learn something new everyday!
« Reply #1 on: July 16, 2012, 08:25:41 pm »
Mallows, my vet said much the same.  My ewes had been wormed when we got them but vet said don't worm again this year. Next year take a faecal sample in for analysis before worming.
Sally
Life is like a bowl of cherries, mostly yummy but some dodgy bits

luckylady

  • Joined Aug 2009
  • Yorkshire
Re: You learn something new everyday!
« Reply #2 on: July 16, 2012, 09:35:03 pm »
Thanks Mallows, I have printed that off for my file  :thumbsup: :thumbsup: :sheep:
Doing that swan thing - cool and calm on the surface but paddling like crazy beneath.

colliewoman

  • Joined Jul 2011
  • Pilton
  • Caution! May spontaneously talk rabbits!
Re: You learn something new everyday!
« Reply #3 on: July 16, 2012, 09:58:24 pm »
Who's your vet hun?


I don't know whether to feel ashamed or lucky that I haven't wormed my sheep since the day I got them!
I have one lamby with a dirty bum at the mo, but that is drying up so i think that one was down to gorging too much of something.
Fingers crossed I continue to keep the little beasts away :fc:
We'll turn the dust to soil,
Turn the rust of hate back into passion.
It's not water into wine
But it's here, and it's happening.
Massive,
but passive.


Bring the peace back

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
    • Trelay Cohousing Community
Re: You learn something new everyday!
« Reply #4 on: July 16, 2012, 11:24:25 pm »
Sounds like you have a great vet.

There's just a few points I'd clarify...

Tapeworms have no detrimental impact on sheep.... don't deworm for it! Expensive and unnecessary!

Not strictly true; tapeworms can cause cysts in sheep, which very rarely can cause symptoms but which can result in condemnation of some meat in fat lambs.

The point is that none of the sheep treatments really have any effect on worms which have already been ingested; the only real treatment is to worm the dogs that carry the worms that infect the sheep.


Ewes after paturition or ewes that have multiple births could do with a worming dose after birthing as they have lower resistance so could do with dosing!

In addition, ewes after parturition emit hundreds of thousands of worm eggs, so it's worth worming them at lambing so that they don't infect the ewes-and-lambs' pasture to quite the same degree.

Lambs have little resistance in their first year but preventative worming is unnecessary and again, expensive. Take in regular fecal samples for free/low cost analysis.

Some vets (mine is one such) are uncomfortable with this approach since some worms can cause considerable damage very quickly, between FEC tests.  However with a low intensity small smallholder flock it's probably a perfectly reasonable approach.  Just don't assume your lambs are clean because you had a clear FEC - if they have worm symptoms, treat them for worms.
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cows (rearing their own calves for beef), pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

SteveHants

  • Joined Aug 2011
Re: You learn something new everyday!
« Reply #5 on: July 16, 2012, 11:51:36 pm »

Some vets (mine is one such) are uncomfortable with this approach since some worms can cause considerable damage very quickly, between FEC tests.  However with a low intensity small smallholder flock it's probably a perfectly reasonable approach.  Just don't assume your lambs are clean because you had a clear FEC - if they have worm symptoms, treat them for worms.


For this reason - one ought to FEC every 8 weeks at the least. Its generally little or no money and actually pretty easy to do yourself in 20 mins. As soon as I can afford a microscope....

Sylvia

  • Joined Aug 2009
Re: You learn something new everyday!
« Reply #6 on: July 17, 2012, 07:49:36 am »
Rotational grazing with different species, cattle, then sheep then ponies and/or geese should do away with the need to use wormers.

Blackbird

  • Joined Jul 2012
Re: You learn something new everyday!
« Reply #7 on: July 17, 2012, 12:15:59 pm »
Mallows, I had a long chat with our vet yesterday when I registered with them (first sheep arrived on Friday) and his advice also conformed with your vet's, especially when I explained we were in a position to keep rotating them onto either fresh pasture, or pasture grazed by horses.

We have a 3 month old lamb with a very runny bottom, but am hopeful it looks a little drier today. Vet said it could take a week for the wormer he was given before I got him to work fully. OH cheerfully remarked this morning that I should leave work early so I could help him wash the "chugnuts" off (erm, the sheep not the OH!) I never expected it to be this much fun  :-J
Where are we going - and why am I in this handcart?

SteveHants

  • Joined Aug 2011
Re: You learn something new everyday!
« Reply #8 on: July 17, 2012, 12:31:20 pm »
I believe "chugnuts" are technically known as "dags" round here (although I believe "clats" is common elsewhere).  ;D

 

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