Agri Vehicles Insurance from Greenlands

Author Topic: Its not as easy as it looks  (Read 14323 times)

Bionic

  • Joined Dec 2010
  • Talley, Carmarthenshire
Its not as easy as it looks
« on: June 13, 2012, 11:15:39 am »
We bought our sheep hurdles yesterday so today was the day for trying to turn over our new sheep.
I reread how to do it in Tim Tyne's book and went over what he showed me at the spring show but the reality is not the same.
 
The sheep are more or less bucket trained so came into the hurdles without a problem but thats when the fun began. Gosh, they can be bolshy when they want to be.
It took a while for me to get them in the right position to even start. Then I could get their head turned in but the other end was a different matter. Somehow, between me and OH we managed to do all three eventually.
There was no particular reason to do it now, other than that I don't want to wait until there is a problem and then find I couldn't do it. So at least I now know what I am up against and can get them in the right position for hoof trimming when it needs to be done. (Kaz had kindly done their hooves on Sat morning before we picked them up).   
 
When we had finished they were keen to get away but once released just starting eating grass so I don't think they were overly upset by it. :fc:
Sally
Life is like a bowl of cherries, mostly yummy but some dodgy bits

Fleecewife

  • Joined May 2010
  • South Lanarkshire
    • ScotHebs
Re: Its not as easy as it looks
« Reply #1 on: June 13, 2012, 11:24:07 am »
The key in Tim's description of how to tip a sheep is to keep your body in contact with its, so that as you move, the sheep comes with you and you are well balanced the whole time.  The other trick is to KNOW that its going to work and you will win  ;D
If your sheep have big horns the whole thing is a bit more complicated - my OH has to reach over the tups and take their opposite legs then tip them onto their sides initially then up to sitting.  Their horns stop their heads from turning enough to do the usual method.
"Let's not talk about what we can do, but do what we can"

There is NO planet B - what are YOU doing to save our home?

Do something today that your future self will thank you for - plant a tree

 Love your soil - it's the lifeblood of your land.

plumseverywhere

  • Joined Apr 2013
  • Worcestershire
    • Its Baaath Time
    • Facebook
Re: Its not as easy as it looks
« Reply #2 on: June 13, 2012, 11:34:39 am »
Had to try and do it on my own with our adult ewes a few months back so I could dag their bums. Not easy at all!! I guess, like all things, comes with practise?
I had to ask my 10 year old to pass my the rear legs so I could check their back feet as I couldnt' reach (must have stumpy arms)
Smallholding in Worcestershire, making goats milk soap for www.itsbaaathtime.com and mum to 4 girls,  goats, sheep, chickens, dog, cat and garden snails...

Rosemary

  • Joined Oct 2007
  • Barry, Angus, Scotland
    • The Accidental Smallholder
Re: Its not as easy as it looks
« Reply #3 on: June 13, 2012, 11:42:44 am »
I don't turn mine at all - I do their feet like you would do a horse and dagging's easy(ish).

The problem with Ryelands is that they don't really bend in the middle, especially when fleeced, being kind of "stocky".

Bionic

  • Joined Dec 2010
  • Talley, Carmarthenshire
Re: Its not as easy as it looks
« Reply #4 on: June 13, 2012, 12:02:42 pm »
Rosemary, thats exactly the problem. I couldn't get them to bend in the middle and despite being recently shorn they are fairly stocky.
I am going to try it without turning them over next time.  Thanks for the tip.
Sally
Life is like a bowl of cherries, mostly yummy but some dodgy bits

kaz

  • Joined Jul 2008
  • Ceredigion
  • Dust yourself off when life throws you down.
Re: Its not as easy as it looks
« Reply #5 on: June 13, 2012, 12:35:24 pm »
You only really need to take a look upside down if there is any trouble under there. i.e flystrike.  I have found it easier is you don't have a headstand to use a head harness and tie them fairly tightly against a hurdle or gate and turn their feet upwards as if you was trimming horses feet. They can be turned by walking backwards with them, but that's another matter!
Don't forget you are the boss.
Penybont Ryelands. Ystwyth Coloured Ryelands.  2 alpacas, 2 angora goats, 2 anglo nubian kids, 3golden retrievers a collie and a red fox labrador retriever, geese, ducks & chickens.

Bionic

  • Joined Dec 2010
  • Talley, Carmarthenshire
Re: Its not as easy as it looks
« Reply #6 on: June 13, 2012, 12:46:53 pm »
Thanks Kaz,
I have a headcollar but haven't tried it yet. I will do as you suggested next time.
Having read what everyone has to say about fly strike on here I am paranoid about it so keep checking every time I go to look at them. Turning them over this morning gave me the opportunity to see places that aren't usually so visable.
Sally
Life is like a bowl of cherries, mostly yummy but some dodgy bits

Foobar

  • Joined Mar 2012
  • South Wales
Re: Its not as easy as it looks
« Reply #7 on: June 13, 2012, 01:47:25 pm »
Does anyone have any opinions on whether certain breeds are more difficult to turn that others?  I think that some of the more   mountain type sheep seem to be more sturdier on their feet and harder to tip (even if they are smaller), than the large lowland breeds.

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
    • Trelay Cohousing Community
Re: Its not as easy as it looks
« Reply #8 on: June 13, 2012, 02:18:19 pm »
As Fleecewife says, the most important thing is to KNOW you are going to get them tipped up, whatever breed they are. 

I can tip a Swale more easily than a large Texel - the biggest Texels are so large I can't reach both ends at once.  If I think I may not be able to tip a one, I get BH to do her - NEVER let them learn they can beat you, they have to KNOW you'll do it too!

Practise on lambs, if you can - even though they're small enough you can pick them up and plonk them on their bottoms, do it the folding-head-in way so that your body learns the moves.

It does get easier, it really does - but some of it is developing the muscles and muscle-memory, so don't be disheartened if it takes a while to get the hang of it.
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cows (rearing their own calves for beef), pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

Bionic

  • Joined Dec 2010
  • Talley, Carmarthenshire
Re: Its not as easy as it looks
« Reply #9 on: June 13, 2012, 03:53:55 pm »
I don't have any lambs but have been practising on the dog  ;D
 
It was a bit of a stuggle but we did manage to do all 3 this morning so they didn't beat us. I am still top dog, or ewe  ;D 
Life is like a bowl of cherries, mostly yummy but some dodgy bits

kaz

  • Joined Jul 2008
  • Ceredigion
  • Dust yourself off when life throws you down.
Re: Its not as easy as it looks
« Reply #10 on: June 13, 2012, 04:04:05 pm »
You can see why we have a turn over crate. :innocent:
 
Penybont Ryelands. Ystwyth Coloured Ryelands.  2 alpacas, 2 angora goats, 2 anglo nubian kids, 3golden retrievers a collie and a red fox labrador retriever, geese, ducks & chickens.

princesspiggy

  • Guest
Re: Its not as easy as it looks
« Reply #11 on: June 13, 2012, 04:51:09 pm »
get borerays, they are much lighter and easier to turn...lol....and this year they have self-shedded their fleece so no shearing either (bit of a shame as it got good money so will have to go collecting by hand, lol)


SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
    • Trelay Cohousing Community
Re: Its not as easy as it looks
« Reply #12 on: June 13, 2012, 05:24:36 pm »
I don't have any lambs but have been practising on the dog  ;D
 
It was a bit of a stuggle but we did manage to do all 3 this morning so they didn't beat us. I am still top dog, or ewe  ;D
:thumbsup:  ;D ;D
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cows (rearing their own calves for beef), pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

VSS

  • Joined Jan 2009
  • Pen Llyn
    • Viable Self Sufficiency.co.uk
Re: Its not as easy as it looks
« Reply #13 on: June 13, 2012, 06:41:43 pm »
Rosemary, thats exactly the problem. I couldn't get them to bend in the middle and despite being recently shorn they are fairly stocky.
I am going to try it without turning them over next time.  Thanks for the tip.
Sally

Keep practising - you WILL get the hang of it, even with tubby sheep. If Tim can do it with one hand and a cup of tea in the other (when he is showing off) I KNOW you can do it with two.
The SHEEP Book for Smallholders
Available from the Good Life Press

www.viableselfsufficiency.co.uk

jaykay

  • Joined Aug 2012
  • Cumbria/N Yorks border
Re: Its not as easy as it looks
« Reply #14 on: June 13, 2012, 07:26:30 pm »
Quote
I don't have any lambs but have been practising on the dog
  :D

This reminds me of when I was training to do my winter Mountain Leader qualification. There is a certain amount of belaying someone coming up a snowslope (round your body belay). Having no ready volunteer, I kept practising tying my lab cross Maia into the rope and belaying her across the living room.

When it came to assessment I passed this bit with flying colours, to the point where the instructor commented on it. I explained how I'd practised and he couldn't stand for laughing for about 5 minutes  :D

 

Forum sponsors

FibreHut Energy Helpline Thomson & Morgan Time for Paws Scottish Smallholder & Grower Festival Ark Farm Livestock Movement Service

© The Accidental Smallholder Ltd 2003-2024. All rights reserved.

Design by Furness Internet

Site developed by Champion IS