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Author Topic: Aggressive cockerel, got to go  (Read 9441 times)

Womble

  • Joined Mar 2009
  • Stirlingshire, Central Scotland
Re: Aggressive cockerel, got to go
« Reply #15 on: January 04, 2012, 11:04:55 am »
where do you stop with the morality of it? :'(

I'd say ex-batts are different. If you buy POLs, then you "caused" both them and their brothers to come into existence. If you merely prolong the life of an ex-batt, who would otherwise have become cat food, and give her a few years of a more natural, life to boot, personally I can't see any moral problem with that.
"All fungi are edible. Some fungi are only edible once." -Terry Pratchett

Heather

  • Joined Sep 2010
  • West Yorkshire
  • Hi, I live in Yorkshire and keep a few chickens
Re: Aggressive cockerel, got to go
« Reply #16 on: January 04, 2012, 11:38:41 am »
Yes, I'd go with that :thumbsup:
Heather

doganjo

  • Joined Aug 2012
  • Clackmannanshire
  • Qui? Moi?
    • ABERDON GUNDOGS for work and show
    • Facebook
Re: Aggressive cockerel, got to go
« Reply #17 on: January 04, 2012, 12:43:48 pm »
where do you stop with the morality of it? :'(

I'd say ex-batts are different. If you buy POLs, then you "caused" both them and their brothers to come into existence. If you merely prolong the life of an ex-batt, who would otherwise have become cat food, and give her a few years of a more natural, life to boot, personally I can't see any moral problem with that.
Compensating factors?  ;D ;D  Ex batts are picked out at hatching, their male brothers are killed immediately they are hatched, apart from breeding stock. Haven't you still caused them to be in existence by buying teh eggs and thenm taking on the ex batts themselves - I rather think this is a 'chicken and egg' situation. ;) ;D ;D ;D ;D ;D
Always have been, always will be, a WYSIWYG - black is black, white is white - no grey in my life! But I'm mellowing in my old age

Barrett

  • Joined Jun 2011
  • North Somerset
Re: Aggressive cockerel, got to go
« Reply #18 on: January 04, 2012, 02:44:11 pm »
I had a really nasty cockerel once called Frank he was a beautiful bird, he drew blood on me and my youngest son who was 7 at the time, my eldest boy would have to cover me with a bucket in hand ready to whack him if he came near me very unpleasant experience, I made him into a curry and he gave us all diarrhea  ;D

ellied

  • Joined Sep 2010
  • Fife
    • Facebook
Re: Aggressive cockerel, got to go
« Reply #19 on: January 04, 2012, 02:55:43 pm »
Interesting discussion - I suppose I currently draw the line at direct cause of death ie doing it myself or telling someone else to, or eating them which increases the number bred for death for my direct benefit.. 

My particular problem with George was that I would be killing him, or causing his death directly through a 3rd party, specifically because of my inability to look after him in a way that allowed his natural instincts to be taken into account ie not his fault he's a male, hormonal, protective of his space/girls and that I'd put him in a place he found stressful.

Anyway, George and the girls, coop, feed, grit, bowls et al are gone.  I took him on and we didn't find a way of co-existing comfortably, so I did the best I could to find him another alternative.  If he proves a handful to a more experienced keeper then that's a different thing than me taking out my inexperience on him.

As for the rescue hens and even the POLs, I see my role as prolonging and improving the lives of existing birds which were bred to lay eggs for others regardless of whether I took them on at some point in their lives or not.  I suppose to be clean with my actions I should avoid asking someone to breed chicks for me, or breed them myself, on the basis that those births are creating 50% deaths..  Now George is away that is far less likely to ever happen, I would find POL or rescue hens again. 

Having pet OAP hens is probably something that will eventually occur if it hasn't already - I am not sure if all the rescue hens are laying but will probably find out in spring if I ever find 8 eggs the same day ;) where the most I get now is 5.  But I can't see my way through feeding them in retirement just as I feed my retired broodmares - I reckon by the time they've retired they don't owe me anything for as long as they're healthy, and I don't have qualms about having a seriously ill or injured pony/hen/cat pts as that is responsibility I take willingly, humane treatment over-riding not killing in that circumstance.

Oh and I realised what happened to male chicks back in my early 20s when I dated a falconer ;) but somehow it didn't bother me to feed meat to a carnivorous bird by hand, any more than I have more than a passing thought or two occasionally about feeding my cats..  I actually recall having defrosted day old chicks in my bag and ripping a head or leg off to give to a buzzard, hawk, owl or falcon, and enjoying it, I'm not squeamish for all my beliefs - or maybe it was lurve ;D


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Barrett

  • Joined Jun 2011
  • North Somerset
Re: Aggressive cockerel, got to go
« Reply #20 on: January 04, 2012, 04:52:42 pm »
Unfortunately for Frank he was just aggressive but for all the wrong reasons he was gay we called him Camp Frank. When my top cockerel Scooby Doo made the danger sound he would run for the coop and push all the girls out the way it was so funny he kept getting to advancing to Scooby Doo which caused friction he was a fab character to watch it was just a shame he was so aggressive to people, he would have been no use to anybody poor bugger. :chook:

 

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