Smallholders Insurance from Greenlands

Author Topic: hedge restoration  (Read 5500 times)

mab

  • Joined Mar 2009
  • carmarthenshire
hedge restoration
« on: March 12, 2009, 08:35:45 pm »
Hi,

My new plot has been neglected for about 3 years (and the hedge wasn't well maintained before that I think). As a result the hawthorn has been subsumed by ivy.

I've made a start on cutting away the ivy near the ground but am aware that the hedge will be full of holes once the ivy's gone - it's got holes already where the underlying hawthorne's died and fallen over from the weight of ivy.

whats the best thing to do with the surviving hawthorn? (I was thinking of cutting it off at head height to encourage it to grow sideways to fill the gaps).

Any advice welcome (this is all new to me and the books I've got are short on advice about hedge restoration).

cheers
mab

mab

  • Joined Mar 2009
  • carmarthenshire
Re: hedge restoration and dealing with ivy
« Reply #1 on: March 12, 2009, 08:44:25 pm »
I've been reading other posts in this section - in particular countrygirlatheart's and thought of another question:-

if I have sheep / goats on the land do I have to get rid of all the ivy (will it be bad for the animals to let them eat the stuff?)?

cheers
mab

Rosemary

  • Joined Oct 2007
  • Barry, Angus, Scotland
    • The Accidental Smallholder
Re: hedge restoration
« Reply #2 on: March 14, 2009, 08:10:44 pm »
There is a hedgelayer on here called Stevie. Might be worth emailing him or hoping he'll have a look at this post.

woodsman

  • Joined Dec 2008
Re: hedge restoration
« Reply #3 on: March 15, 2009, 08:19:14 pm »
hi ,
-such a difficult query to respond to -  hedge monkeys really do need to be stood next to the item to be able to let the wisdom(/bullpoo) flow.
it is likely that cutting thorn at headheight will encourage epicormic regen (nice 'wisdom/') from that point ie in a pollardy stylee. - is that what you want ?
and more to the point , is the hedge fenced both sides ?
If it's too steep to plough , put sheep on it , if the sheep fall off , plant trees .

woollyval

  • Joined Feb 2008
  • Near Bodmin, Cornwall
    • Val Grainger
Re: hedge restoration
« Reply #4 on: March 26, 2009, 02:13:37 pm »
Hi Mab

We also lay hedges, restore hedges and my OH is a qualified tree surgeon...........so if you want some help shout we are on the Somerset Devon border and can and will help.
Can you post a pic of ypur hedges? I would suggest cutting down now is a bit late due to nesting birds but you do have the option to lay or coppice the hedge next autumn and it will soon look smashing!

Do not cut it at head height.............hedges do not grow much sideways, more just up and you will end up with a row of bonsai trees!!

Regarding the ivy and sheep, do not worry, they are fine with it and will not eat the berries unless starving, however they may damage the hedge by eating/barking it! Suggest fencing it off, the fence can be 'dropped' to allow management in the autumn

let us know if we can help
www.berry land cottage.co.uk
www.valgrainger.co.uk

Overall winner of the Devon Environmental Business Awards 2009

mab

  • Joined Mar 2009
  • carmarthenshire
Re: hedge restoration
« Reply #5 on: April 07, 2009, 08:09:19 pm »
Hi folks,

Thanks for the replies.  Sorry for not coming back before now but I lost my internet connection, then a bit of work turned up before I could get it sorted (can't afford to neglect customers).

To belatedly answer the questions, there are no fences yet (I'll be putting one up to retain the animals of course).

Thanks for the warning on cutting at head height - that was what I was thinking of doing (I had to do that to one of the hawthorns as there was such a weight of Ivy on its top that it was starting to uproot in a moderate breeze).

Don't know how to post pics, though I may have a go once I've taken a pic...

I stopped all work on the hedge for the summer for the birds. The idea of laying the hedge (in the autumn) sounds good but I think that may be impractical for much of the hedge as it's now made largely of a few large wide-spaced trunks that are too big to lay (Assuming my idea of what hedge laying is is accurate - half-cutting stems and laying them over). How large a stem can be laid?  If head-height trimming is not the answer, then I suspect it'll be a case of planting saplings in the gaps?

thanks again for your replies, and I'll try not to disappear again after posting a question (*?*!!#~ computers!  >:( )

mab

woollyval

  • Joined Feb 2008
  • Near Bodmin, Cornwall
    • Val Grainger
Re: hedge restoration
« Reply #6 on: April 08, 2009, 09:28:14 pm »
Hi Mab

It may well be possible to lay it if the diametre is under 6 inches or if larger it can be coppiced and gaps replanted with more hawthorn whips in the autumn. Then you will have some good firewood as well as a nice rejuvenated hedge!
www.berry land cottage.co.uk
www.valgrainger.co.uk

Overall winner of the Devon Environmental Business Awards 2009

 

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