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Author Topic: what to do with Borage?  (Read 4442 times)

northfifeduckling

  • Joined Jan 2009
  • Fife
    • North Fife Blog
what to do with Borage?
« on: October 31, 2011, 01:57:02 pm »
it has self-seeded all over the veg plot - what can I do with it? Nobody likes the texture of the leaves in a salad here and the flowers are nearly finished now. I know the seeds are supposed to be healthy but seem to be difficult to harvest! I just can not bring myself to just chuck it all on the compost  ::) :&>

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
    • Trelay Cohousing Community
Re: what to do with Borage?
« Reply #1 on: October 31, 2011, 02:55:21 pm »
it has self-seeded all over the veg plot - what can I do with it?
I think you can put it in drinks like Pimms, but I don't think it goes with mulled wine, which is more seasonal...

If you don't like it in salads, I'd just enjoy it, compost it when it goes over, and look forward to more and yet more next year...!  ;) :D
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cows (rearing their own calves for beef), pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

Fleecewife

  • Joined May 2010
  • South Lanarkshire
    • ScotHebs
Re: what to do with Borage?
« Reply #2 on: October 31, 2011, 02:58:03 pm »
I believe it's related to comfrey so it is a positive addition to the compost heap.  As Sally says, look forward to lots more next year because the bees  :bee: :bee: :bee: absolutely love it
"Let's not talk about what we can do, but do what we can"

There is NO planet B - what are YOU doing to save our home?

Do something today that your future self will thank you for - plant a tree

 Love your soil - it's the lifeblood of your land.

Plantoid

  • Joined May 2011
  • Yorkshireman on a hill in wet South Wales
Re: what to do with Borage?
« Reply #3 on: November 01, 2011, 08:40:30 pm »
I believe it's related to comfrey so it is a positive addition to the compost heap.  As Sally says, look forward to lots more next year because the bees  :bee: :bee: :bee: absolutely love it

 The bees will go absolutely  beserk for the high quality sugars produced in the stems after you cut it 3 or so inches off the ground after the flowers have dies off . just don't stand in the line from hives and plants or you'll get machine gunned by busy irritated bees as you'll be in their flight lines and liable to be badly stung.

 if you do have bees and have no other need for the plant leave both parts of the plant where they fall till the bees stop taking the sugars from both of them
International playboy & liar .
Man of the world not a country

 

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