NFU Mutual Smallholding Insurance

Author Topic: "Safer" Chainsaws?  (Read 7529 times)

Cinderhills

  • Joined Jul 2010
  • North Yorkshire
Re: "Safer" Chainsaws?
« Reply #15 on: September 12, 2011, 03:19:20 pm »
This info here is so useful.  My OH wants a chainsaw for cutting wood for the fire.  I have finally come round to the idea that he needs a petrol one and knew he should go on a course.  But I have learnt a lot from this thread, especially about the course being in two parts and don't buy anything until after the first part.

So thank you DominicJ for starting this off and everyone else for their great answers. :)
Voss Electric Fence

suziequeue

  • Joined Feb 2010
  • Llanidloes; Powys
Re: "Safer" Chainsaws?
« Reply #16 on: September 12, 2011, 03:34:17 pm »
Cinderhills

I have noticed in shops that you can get a saw mounting bracket (see here: http://www.mowermagic.co.uk/acatalog/Loggers_Safety_Horse.html to which you can yoke up your chainsaw and then - with the log on the saw horse, you can hinge the chain saw up and down to cut the log. There are loads of good gadgets for cutting logs.
We do the best we can with the information we have

When we know better we do better

Cinderhills

  • Joined Jul 2010
  • North Yorkshire
Re: "Safer" Chainsaws?
« Reply #17 on: September 12, 2011, 11:16:00 pm »
Thanks Suziequeue. Looks like a useful piece of equipment.

DominicJ

  • Joined Apr 2011
Re: "Safer" Chainsaws?
« Reply #18 on: September 14, 2011, 03:23:17 pm »
I only have a couple of trees, and they need pruning rather than cutting, although when ones an oak taller than your house, pruning is quite a job, but electric is fine for my needs

Suzie
Thats the sort of thing I was thinking of, although arn armature that held the chainsaw before you chopped the tree down would be handier.

waterhouse

  • Guest
Re: "Safer" Chainsaws?
« Reply #19 on: September 16, 2011, 11:52:00 pm »
I notice that Oregon do a chain sharpening attachment for bars unto 16". I prefer longer so haven't triedvit out.

A while back, ok 30 years back, anti kickback chains appeared with a riser before the depth gauge but it slows the chain down so I imagine heavy users use conventional chain.  To be safe the chain needs to be wickedly sharp so you get chippings not dust. I always have several chains and sharpen the lot when I've finished: a newly sharpened chain is very satisfying to use.

I used to have an 045 stihl but gave it away when I hadnt used it for a few years.  Regretted it, a fine gutsy saw that you could really lean into.

suziequeue

  • Joined Feb 2010
  • Llanidloes; Powys
Re: "Safer" Chainsaws?
« Reply #20 on: September 17, 2011, 08:01:32 am »
I agree Waterhouse - ther's nothing more satisfying than a really sharp chain.

 :) :)
We do the best we can with the information we have

When we know better we do better

mab

  • Joined Mar 2009
  • carmarthenshire
Re: "Safer" Chainsaws?
« Reply #21 on: September 24, 2011, 09:06:30 pm »
I bought a stihl last November without any qualifications - just had to be there in person.

For safety: a small lightweight saw, no bigger than you need, a sharp chain, and THINK!  ;D

mab

waterhouse

  • Guest
Re: "Safer" Chainsaws?
« Reply #22 on: September 25, 2011, 08:46:17 am »
The scar from my chain saw accident remains after 32 years  as a reminder. It was a very minor accident which happened when the chain was running down because I was tired and careless but it was messy because it cut a groove in my leg. 

Fortunately I wasnt on my own so I was driven to casualty. Unfortunately they failed to understand the nature of the wound so ten days later when I removed the dressing blood pissed out everywhere and I then had to drive myself to get it fixed. Hence the scar after all this time.

Kickback isn't the risk it was because of modern chains but in addition to the dangers of the saw there are the hazards from hung-up trees and the like. Please go on a course.

DJ_Chook

  • Joined Jun 2009
  • Mid Wales
  • Chicken mad, nothing else just chickens.
Re: "Safer" Chainsaws?
« Reply #23 on: September 25, 2011, 09:20:18 am »
The scar from my chain saw accident remains after 32 years  as a reminder. It was a very minor accident....

Please go on a course...

I agree. Please go on a course and wear the appropriate safety clothes. My partner is an ex-forestry worker, used to using professional chainsaws such as the Powersaw Husqvarna XP range. We've seen 2 very minor accidents that caused significant bone and tissue damage. 1 was an gardener who sliced his finger to the bone while sharpening his chain. The other a pro who cut through the flesh in his leg and into the bone while his saw was just slowing to a stop. He wasn't wearing any safety trousers. I've seen so many near misses... little nips into safety trousers,  forestry boots with the leather shaved off the steel toecaps, chunks of wood wedged into helmet visors.. Never use the tip of the saw to cut unless you have a firm handle grip and are prepared for big kickback. Make sure what you are cutting isn't going to get thrown up by the spinning chain.

All this applies regardless, if you are using a small electric chainsaw or a pro powersaw.

If anyone wants a professional lumberjack to do some felling or crosscutting within 30 miles of Newtown Powys Mid wales send me a PM
Chicken nutter extraordinaire.

 

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