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Author Topic: transplanting self seeding trees  (Read 5560 times)

tobytoby

  • Joined May 2011
  • north ayrshire
transplanting self seeding trees
« on: September 10, 2011, 01:07:11 pm »
I would like to run some sheep and pigs in a 4 acre wood. Could anyone tell me how and when would be the best time to move these young trees from a mature wood to form a new shelter belt between 2 new fence lines.The trees are beech elm and oak, with some hawthorn seedlings also, the sizes are between 1 and 2 feet.Thanks

violet

  • Joined Jul 2009
Re: transplanting self seeding trees
« Reply #1 on: September 10, 2011, 01:18:46 pm »
I'm not quite sure I understand  ??? sorry.

Are the livestock to be in the mature wood?

If so you certainly need to move the young trees first.

The sheep will nip the tops & strip the bark and the pigs will probably dig them up.

It may be advicable to put individual tree guards round the young ones too as any escapee, wild rabbits or deer could devastate your crop overnight.

Fleecewife

  • Joined May 2010
  • South Lanarkshire
    • ScotHebs
Re: transplanting self seeding trees
« Reply #2 on: September 10, 2011, 01:30:36 pm »
I would like to run some sheep and pigs in a 4 acre wood. Could anyone tell me how and when would be the best time to move these young trees from a mature wood to form a new shelter belt between 2 new fence lines.The trees are beech elm and oak, with some hawthorn seedlings also, the sizes are between 1 and 2 feet.Thanks
You can move them anytime when the leaves are off so over winter - this is the safest time for bare root planting, and they are an ideal size.  As well as the double fencing you will need to keep the weeds down for the first couple of years.  When you dig up the seedlings, put them straight into a sack to protect the roots from drying out in the wind - it happens very quickly.  It all sounds good although I agree that you should protect the mature trees from the livestock - sheep will strip bark enough to kill the trees but chicken wire wrapped around will help - remember to keep it loose as the trees continue to grow
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tobytoby

  • Joined May 2011
  • north ayrshire
Re: transplanting self seeding trees
« Reply #3 on: September 11, 2011, 07:40:39 pm »
Thanks Fleecewife - if this wind keeps up the leaves will be off by the end of the week?? I am hoping that running upto 4 sheep, they won,t strip the bark?

suziequeue

  • Joined Feb 2010
  • Llanidloes; Powys
Re: transplanting self seeding trees
« Reply #4 on: September 11, 2011, 09:10:08 pm »
Ooh - this is a good thread. I've noticed that some of last year's wind fall apples seem to have grown into seedlings. They are about a foot high and very spindly.

Should I leave them for another year? or transplant them somewhere else this winter?
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