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Author Topic: Grass/woodland and water management  (Read 2123 times)

SavageU

  • Joined May 2023
Grass/woodland and water management
« on: December 14, 2023, 03:42:01 pm »
Hi,

Inspected our fields today as considering applying for some funding for dam management schemes. Weve two streams through the field unmanaged currently. They lead to a back that floods and is flooding now.

What trees would you plant to help waterlogged soil, Im thinking a Scots pine?

Woodland management, theyve obviously all shed their leaves and covering the grass-would you move this to let grass grow? Im thinking just a dead hedge/leaf pile?

We are also looking into woodland schemes as it is ancient woodland, problem is weve beeches and Holly growing like billio and its managing them after isnt it.




doganjo

  • Joined Aug 2012
  • Clackmannanshire
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Re: Grass/woodland and water management
« Reply #1 on: December 15, 2023, 10:01:24 am »
I googled
Best Trees for Wet Areas and Planting Near Water
Betula Nigra River Birch Tree. ...
Populus Tremula Quaking Aspen Tree. ...
Populus Tremula Erecta Swedish Aspen. ...
Alnus Glutinosa Common Alder (Multi Stem) ...
Salix Alba White Willow Tree. ...
Salix Sepulcralis Chrysocoma Golden Weeping Willow.

Willows from my experience grow like mad too, and need cutting to keep in check, but they make excellent burning for stoves etc, and obviously for making things.
Weeping willow can get very big but it tends to stay in one area, not really spread underground
I don't have experience of any of the others, but I think they take longer to dry out for burning
HTH
Always have been, always will be, a WYSIWYG - black is black, white is white - no grey in my life! But I'm mellowing in my old age

Fleecewife

  • Joined May 2010
  • South Lanarkshire
    • ScotHebs
Re: Grass/woodland and water management
« Reply #2 on: December 15, 2023, 03:42:18 pm »
Alder and any Willows are excellent for drying up land.  They both grow quickly; willow branches and leaves can be used for animal fodder and both trees can be used as firewood.  Alder can be used for paths through wet areas.  I don't think Scot's Pine is specifically useful in wet areas and is fairly slow growing, but beautiful.
I would plant Willow and Alder along the banks of the beck, as they will also stabilise the soil.


Fallen leaves are nourishment for the future in a woodland so I see no need to clear them up.  Log piles are brilliant dotted around in woodland for insects and hibernating creatures.  One way you could deal with fallen leaves on grass is to mow them using a machine with a collection box, then compost to make wonderful seedling compost, absolutely the bizz!


Sorry I don't know about woodland schemes. We avoid such things as they tend to be quite prescriptive.
"Let's not talk about what we can do, but do what we can"

There is NO planet B - what are YOU doing to save our home?

Do something today that your future self will thank you for - plant a tree

 Love your soil - it's the lifeblood of your land.

PaulStaffs

  • Joined Sep 2021
Re: Grass/woodland and water management
« Reply #3 on: December 18, 2023, 08:19:30 pm »
I've had good success with alder, black poplar, crack willow and weeping willow. All of these will grow quickly whereas Scots Pine which you mention is a lovely tree but comparatively slow to grow.

Crack willow is a favourite of mine. It's considered an invasive species in some countries. If you snip branches off and stick them in the ground, they'll grow. I planted about 200 of these 18 months ago varying 6-10ft and i'd say 175 of them rooted and have grown 2-4ft in that time - remarkable!

Weeping willow they do say to be careful where you plant it, if it's near a stream you'll have no concerns, but be aware anything manmade (foundations, pipes etc etc) it will reportedly search for water to the extent it will break in. Can't comment if this is a story or not as haven't chanced it.

doganjo

  • Joined Aug 2012
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Re: Grass/woodland and water management
« Reply #4 on: December 19, 2023, 09:18:35 am »
Weeping willow they do say to be careful where you plant it, if it's near a stream you'll have no concerns, but be aware anything manmade (foundations, pipes etc etc) it will reportedly search for water to the extent it will break in. Can't comment if this is a story or not as haven't chanced it.
I can't say that about weeping willow, but we did have a problem with white willow - it got into old field drains and choked them resulting in a sodden field.  The drains needed replacing anyway but we had hoped to leave it a couple of years
Always have been, always will be, a WYSIWYG - black is black, white is white - no grey in my life! But I'm mellowing in my old age

SavageU

  • Joined May 2023
Re: Grass/woodland and water management
« Reply #5 on: January 01, 2024, 04:19:58 pm »
Thank you. I know it's an issue at this time of year, but the poor sheep are hating the waterlogged soil so I need to address this and some rotational grazing.

 

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