Smallholders Insurance from Greenlands

Author Topic: Concrete frame  (Read 1643 times)

Je

  • Joined May 2015
Concrete frame
« on: December 13, 2023, 07:04:53 am »
Hi wonder if anyone could advise me please?
1960ís concrete frame agri shed.
Concrete beginning to crumble metal rods inside beginning to show.
Can I replace without deconstructing huge shed?
Can it be repaired /strengthened?
What company might do work ( West of Scotland) ?
Thank you for any advice please.

chrismahon

  • Joined Dec 2011
  • Gascony, France
Re: Concrete frame
« Reply #1 on: December 13, 2023, 10:24:45 am »
These reinforced concrete sections split because the steel bars inside are oxidising/ rusting, which happens when the pH of the concrete becomes less alkaline (below 12.5?). Their volume increases and with the concrete having poor tensile strength it splits. Ive seen structures repaired by removing the concrete, vapour blasting the bars (to make sure they are OK) and then cement rendered over. Everything will depend on the location and condition. The problem is that once the overall pH level of all the beams has reduced, due to damp and rain acidity, they are all on the route to failure. So any repair will only be a temporary fix and soon (a few years) the whole structure will need replacing, unless you can identify a particular problem which has caused an isolated failure.


I did see a barn with one upright completely failed which was due to leaking guttering. The whole beam was replaced with a steel column and I repaired the guttering.

Je

  • Joined May 2015
Re: Concrete frame
« Reply #2 on: December 13, 2023, 10:21:11 pm »
Thank you for this information. It is interesting and a bit concerning.
Who would I contact for repair or replacement?
Iím guessing a new shed would be suggested but not an option.
Thank you

chrismahon

  • Joined Dec 2011
  • Gascony, France
Re: Concrete frame
« Reply #3 on: December 14, 2023, 10:03:09 am »
You are either going to need a specialist company (google 'reinforced concrete repair') , or somehow do it yourself. As said, it all depends on the level of deterioration, so whether it is one specific location or the whole structure. It does sound as though a whole new structure is needed, because the cost of replacing or repairing a few parts of it may well be a lot more?


They are replacing all the old gravity cast reinforced concrete pylons in this area at the moment, because they are splitting and collapsing in high winds. They were still being installed in the late 80's. They are being replaced with a pressure cast reinforced item- we've had ours taken out and the supply re-routed.


Have you somewhere else to put everything that is currently in it?

Je

  • Joined May 2015
Re: Concrete frame
« Reply #4 on: December 14, 2023, 09:53:11 pm »
Thank you again. Will do as you have suggested. Shed is probably 90% ok but action this Summer might just save me having to renew🤞

Kiran

  • Joined Apr 2019
Re: Concrete frame
« Reply #5 on: March 02, 2024, 06:01:38 am »
It's possible to treat the exposed steel and repair the concrete if it isn't too far gone. You can also have sacrificial anodes installed which help prevent further corrosion. I'm not sure which companies work in your area but there are national companies who will cover the area if you can't find anyone local

 

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