Smallholders Insurance from Greenlands

Author Topic: Can i get planning to develop a farm ruin into a small dwelling? Dartmoor  (Read 1690 times)

tobygoodger

  • Joined Jul 2023
I am aware that is often reviewed on a case by case basis. But im wondering if anyone has been through the same journey?

I am looking to buy some land, i don't have much money so hunting for something (as many of us are im sure) without a house on it but with potential for development of a ruin or farm building.

Has anyone successfully applied for planning of an old farm ruin? This piece of land i have come across is in dartmoor national park.

https://www.rightmove.co.uk/properties/136349825#/?channel=COM_BUY

MAny Thanks !

Rosemary

  • Joined Oct 2007
  • Barry, Angus, Scotland
    • The Accidental Smallholder

doganjo

  • Joined Aug 2012
  • Clackmannanshire
  • Qui? Moi?
    • ABERDON GUNDOGS for work and show
    • Facebook
My experience is in Scotland only, but when i wanted to build my house in Aberdeenshire in 2005, planning told me I could develop the property only if the old building still had a roof

However, I went back to them and told them that no one else could build anything on the plot as it was landlocked by our land, and that if I didn't get planning the whole site and field would go rampant.  I also said that I would prefer to take the two conjoined workers cottages down and use the granite blocks to face a completely new building, and that the new house was for me to live in. I had already sold the old cottage I was in along with about a third of the land

When they came out to look they realised it was sensible to allow me to build a house to improve the amenity of the hamlet, and granted permission

I have heard of that stipulation in other cases, but only in Scotland.
Always have been, always will be, a WYSIWYG - black is black, white is white - no grey in my life! But I'm mellowing in my old age

SallyintNorth

  • Joined Feb 2011
  • Cornwall
  • Rarely short of an opinion but I mean well
    • Trelay Cohousing Community
Reading the method of sale, they will keep taking bids until it tops out, so you can be 100% confident that if there is *any* possibility of ever getting pp for a dwelling, it will achieve a price accordingly. 

Don't let me put you off having a punt, but please (and here is my voice of experience!) don't fall in love with a future there until and unless your bid is accepted, contracts signed, sealed and delivered! 

I wish you luck, and to avoid a broken heart...
Don't listen to the money men - they know the price of everything and the value of nothing

Live in a cohousing community with small farm for our own use.  Dairy cows (rearing their own calves for beef), pigs, sheep for meat and fleece, ducks and hens for eggs, veg and fruit growing

Badger Nadgers

  • Joined Mar 2013
  • Derbyshire/North Staffs
Also be aware that planning in National Parks is different.  You can't do the agricultural  "permitted development" inthe normal way and there can be far stricter planning requirements.  I would suggest your change of getting PP for permanent residence are pretty minimal.

 

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